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[
    {
        "id": 2637077,
        "hacker": "Jach",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 1,
        "comment": "The silly thing is that if they do make it illegal because some businesses\nwon't report bitcoin profits to the IRS, that will just guarantee that _all_\nbusinesses (licensed or unlicensed) using bitcoin won't report profits.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 3663664,
        "hacker": "Jach",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 1,
        "comment": "I was also thinking of PHP's register_globals. I was tempted to make a snide\nremark, so I'll make it now. The difference here is that the PHP group\nrealized register_globals was a bad idea, deprecated it in 5.3 and removed it\nin 5.4. Furthermore the default has been OFF since 4.2.0. The resistance to\nfixing the Rails problem just makes me ever less likely to give Rails a shot,\nit should be really bad PR when you ignore security issues.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.392"
    },
    {
        "id": 5002035,
        "hacker": "Jach",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 1,
        "comment": "I thought it's just 10 years, hardly forever. And comparing the USA to a\nsingle European nation is misleading.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.121"
    },
    {
        "id": 11993723,
        "hacker": "awqrre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 2,
        "comment": "They share data between governments to avoid local privacy laws... I think\nthat the laws need to be updated to reflect that.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10673787,
        "hacker": "awqrre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 2,
        "comment": "please help me understand why this comment is so unpopular?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10725143,
        "hacker": "awqrre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 2,
        "comment": "It's a bit like Tor, except worst since it's all controlled by one entity?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-1.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12052905,
        "hacker": "devishard",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 3,
        "comment": "God that's a horribly confusing way to report that bug. Why not something\nlike?\n\n    \n    \n        #include <stdio.h>\n    \n        int main (void)\n        {\n          signed char one = 1;\n          unsigned char coerced_to_positive_255 = -1;\n          printf (\"%d\\n\", one > coerced_to_positive_255);\n          return 0;\n        }\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.067"
    },
    {
        "id": 11903436,
        "hacker": "devishard",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 3,
        "comment": "> not to mention you're giving a _depressant_ to a depressed person\n\nThat's about as terrible as giving _ham_ to a hamster.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-1.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12278172,
        "hacker": "devishard",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 3,
        "comment": "> Even if we don't have free will, it's better to pretend we do. There is a\n> difference between a driver that falls asleep at the wheel and causes an\n> accident and a driver that flies into a rage and crashes their car into\n> another driver. It's hard to justify the distinction if neither driver has a\n> choice. I'd argue it's better for society to maintain that distinction.\n\nThe distinction still matters without free will, because it's still a\npredictor of future behavior. A driver who crashes because of a preventable\ncause shouldn't be allowed to drive until the problem is resolved. If the\nproblem is falling asleep, the solution may be simple (get more sleep?) or\nhard (narcolepsy), while anger issues are probably pretty difficult to\nprovably solve.\n\nBelief in free will has some seriously harmful effects on the way we deal with\nthese situations. Most notably, it's the basis for a focus on punishment\nrather than rehabilitation. Deterrents don't work, largely because they don't\nfix the causes for bad behavior. Rehabilitation is the only sensible approach\nif you don't believe in free will, whereas punishment makes a bit more sense\nif you believe that people have free will.\n\n> Perhaps someone can reframe that in terms of types of error, and people\n> prone to more serious types of error (road rage) face different\n> consequences. But that gets real complicated real quick.\n\nThis is fundamentally a free-will-based way of seeing the problem.\n\"Consequences\" are completely irrelevant in a deterministic worldview unless\nyou can prove that they act as a deterrent (that is, that they are part of the\ncause). Since consequences are provably _not_ significant deterrents for many\ncrimes, I don't think that works.\n\nYour argument basically that \"this idea of punishment/consequences (which only\nmakes sense in a free-will-based ideology) doesn't work in a deterministic\nideology, and punishment/consequences are good in my free-will-based ideology,\ntherefore deterministic ideologies are wrong\". But you have to hold a free-\nwill-based ideology for the preconditions of your argument to make sense.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.088"
    },
    {
        "id": 14973369,
        "hacker": "johansch",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 4,
        "comment": "This NYT reporter filed the first article on the topic:\n\nhttps://twitter.com/daiwaka/\n\nHis report (and tweeting) was so partisan that I got really concerned with the\nintegrity of the NYT as a whole. This new piece restores some of my confidence\nin them, even though it is just an opinion piece.'\n\nBtw - is it just me, or is he way too friendly with the people running the\ncompany he is assigned to report on?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.232"
    },
    {
        "id": 13056664,
        "hacker": "johansch",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 4,
        "comment": "I think in most of Europe there's a relatively painful 50/50 balance between\npassenger and freight traffic. The freight trains run mostly at night. The\ntracks are used really, really hard, which causes maintenance issues.\n\nIt's quite hard to do track maintenance well when there's a train passing by\nevery 5-10 minutes, 24/7\\. Maintenance windows can become really expensive.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.131"
    },
    {
        "id": 11458914,
        "hacker": "johansch",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 4,
        "comment": "Valve seems to be in insanely well-funded and chaotically managed\norganization.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-1.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 17494269,
        "hacker": "arisAlexis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 5,
        "comment": "why would a company trying to build a product be a greater fool example? you\nmean all startups that fail at very high rates are also that?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.026"
    },
    {
        "id": 10036496,
        "hacker": "arisAlexis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 5,
        "comment": "I totally agree that I feel smarter although you cannot tell from a closed\nloop system. Maybe I am slower but hell I do so many more things better\nbecause I know the deadly mistakes I should avoid now. I am also 35.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 14864635,
        "hacker": "arisAlexis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 5,
        "comment": "are you basically saying to OP to not invest because people like you cannot\nfind apartments? Sorry to say but our society doesn't work like that\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 16707745,
        "hacker": "arisAlexis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 5,
        "comment": "governmemts are thinking of putting assets and laws on Blockchain, stock\nexchanges are waiting for scalability to start putting everything on the\nblockchain. Immutable government records already exist. Where do you base your\nargument?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.800"
    },
    {
        "id": 8683135,
        "hacker": "jonsen",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 6,
        "comment": "Maybe too OT, but here is another proof\n\n    \n    \n      P = n * (n+1) * (n+2) * (n+3) \n    \n         = n*(n+3) * (n+1)*(n+2) \n    \n         = (n*n + 3n) * (n*n + 3n + 2) \n    \n         = m * (m+2) \n    \n      If P has an integer square root, it must be (m+1) \n    \n      Trying (m+1) * (m+1) we get m*m + 2m + 1 = m * (m+2) + 1 = P + 1\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.750"
    },
    {
        "id": 5569411,
        "hacker": "jonsen",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 6,
        "comment": "(5,2) - (1,0) = (4,2)\n\n(4,2)/2 = (2,1)\n\n(2,1) + (1,0) = (3,1)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.750"
    },
    {
        "id": 15860864,
        "hacker": "jonsen",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 6,
        "comment": "Great. Teach kids some rote manipulations. Things they will have forgotten if\nthey later stumble upon some math. Or will have to relearn in college math.\n\nWill the same mistake happen with the learning to code in school movement? Or\nwill there be a sensible connection between abstract computer science and high\nschool coding?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.182"
    },
    {
        "id": 16140678,
        "hacker": "jonsen",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 6,
        "comment": "It was possible: \"Being IBM PC/XT compatible and running MS-DOS 5.0 from ROM,\nthe HP 200LX can run virtually any program that would run on a full-size PC\ncompatible computer as long as the code is written for the Intel 8086, 8088 or\n80186 CPU and can run using CGA graphics. It can also run programs written for\nthe 80286 CPU, provided they do not require the use of protected mode.\":\n\nhttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/HP_200LX\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 21280435,
        "hacker": "jonsen",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 6,
        "comment": "“An alternate term is combinatorial logic,[2] though this usage may be\nconsidered controversial.[3]”:\n\nhttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combinational_logic\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 21403948,
        "hacker": "topmonk",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 7,
        "comment": "But that's mob justice. I'm not saying you're wrong, but failure of our courts\ncan lead to extraordinarily bad times.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.506"
    },
    {
        "id": 14786324,
        "hacker": "topmonk",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 7,
        "comment": "If you are talking about independent alt-coins, such as Ethereum and Litecoin,\nthey are completely separate from Bitcoin, and this would have no effect.\n\nIf you are talking about tokens on the Bitcoin network, such as MaidSafeCoin,\nthey would also split.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 17397328,
        "hacker": "topmonk",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 7,
        "comment": "You're asking him to prove a negative. The onus should be on you.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 21407277,
        "hacker": "mnw21cam",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 8,
        "comment": "Goes to a blank page for me, and outline.com doesn't work with it. Anyone\nactually got some content?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18327440,
        "hacker": "mnw21cam",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 8,
        "comment": "Is it disturbing that when I read \"coffee cup\", I thought of those paper\ndisposable things with no handle?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 12497711,
        "hacker": "mnw21cam",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 8,
        "comment": "Because it was a sideways move (in other words, I was already working for the\nsame university) it would have been illegal for them to lower my pay.\n\nIronically, them telling me I was underqualified (specifically, I didn't have\ndoctorate) spurred me on to go and get one. I had basically hit the ceiling\nfor a Mr. in a university.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.208"
    },
    {
        "id": 7195686,
        "hacker": "mnw21cam",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 8,
        "comment": "So, if the agent checked the wrong boxes, presumably (in order to place this\nperson on the no fly list) there must have been something dodgy in the boxes\nthat were checked. Does this mean that someone else (who the boxes actually\nbelonged to) was mistakenly _not_ put on the no fly list? Shouldn't the\ngovernment be trying to track this person down?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.295"
    },
    {
        "id": 14943296,
        "hacker": "selimthegrim",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 9,
        "comment": "Billy Nungesser by far being the worst example of this at a state level (I say\nthis as someone who turned down a tech job in SF to go to grad school at\nTulane)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.352"
    },
    {
        "id": 11986189,
        "hacker": "selimthegrim",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 9,
        "comment": "http://amlbook.com\n\nhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbyG85GZ0PI (incidentally for graycat, Yaser\nAbumostafa is a Muslim Egyptian immigrant from Cairo) He covers the VC\ndimension in https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dc0sr0kdBVI, and leaves the proof\nto an appendix of the book.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19955065,
        "hacker": "selimthegrim",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 9,
        "comment": "Link is broken.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 6210924,
        "hacker": "return0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 10,
        "comment": "Nah, it's just PR bullshit. Did women ever complain that tech conferences are\ntoo expensive to attend?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 5196014,
        "hacker": "return0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 10,
        "comment": "I know there is a gender pay gap. The question is: how do we know it's not\njustified? Presumably the pay reflects the work done\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 11796089,
        "hacker": "return0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 10,
        "comment": "That it was illegally obtained. (could the first seller of the sarcophagus\nlegally prove they owned it?)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.017"
    },
    {
        "id": 5371320,
        "hacker": "arbuge",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 11,
        "comment": "When you get tired of food, wine, women/men/{other object of attraction},\nsong, and sleep, you are tired of life.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 6109281,
        "hacker": "arbuge",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 11,
        "comment": "Passport revocation is pretty routine for suspects facing serious charges\nthough:\n\nhttp://travel.state.gov/passport/ppi/info/info_870.html\n\nA federal, state or local law enforcement agency may request the denial or\nrevocation of a passport on several regulatory grounds set forth in 22 C.F.R.\n§§ 51.60, 51.61, and 51.62. The principal law enforcement reasons for passport\ndenial or revocation are an unsealed federal, state, or local felony arrest\nwarrant, a federal or state criminal court order or a condition of parole or\nprobation forbidding departure from the United States (or the jurisdiction of\nthe court), or a request for extradition to or from the United States. Any\nsuch request needs to include a copy of the arrest warrant or criminal court\norder. Please also be advised that all passport applicants are run through\nvarious law enforcement and other databases.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.092"
    },
    {
        "id": 10601913,
        "hacker": "arbuge",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 11,
        "comment": "I am not familiar with Albanian tax laws, so I can't answer that. I would\nimagine they are not offering pass-through entities though, since those just\nshift the point of taxation, not remove it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.188"
    },
    {
        "id": 20269959,
        "hacker": "bostonvaulter2",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 12,
        "comment": "I'd definitely recommend the official getting-started guide, it's quite well-\nwritten and thorough: https://elixir-lang.org/getting-\nstarted/introduction.html\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3171086,
        "hacker": "bostonvaulter2",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 12,
        "comment": "Do you ever feel awkward at work because you're meditating?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.600"
    },
    {
        "id": 4115610,
        "hacker": "bostonvaulter2",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 12,
        "comment": "It is going to be really tough for me to avoid that since that is exactly the\nbehavior that I am drawn to when a problem presents itself.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.069"
    },
    {
        "id": 10919224,
        "hacker": "feld",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 13,
        "comment": "Linux is not that great at compatibility with old code or old binaries.\nWindows has always been better at this.\n\nAn example of a *nix with good backwards compat is FreeBSD. The FreeBSD\ncluster has binaries from FreeBSD 2 (1994) that still run. Try that with Linux\n-- I guarantee you the kernel and glibc broke compatibility. Hell, there are\nLinux games from early ~2000s that won't run anymore.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.383"
    },
    {
        "id": 8304807,
        "hacker": "feld",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 13,
        "comment": "Oracle extended ZFS to be able to encrypt specific filesystems, but this\nmethod has been heavily scrutinized for being susceptible to watermarking\nattacks\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 11765109,
        "hacker": "feld",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 13,
        "comment": "Is lighttpd still in use? It's had terrible memory leaks gone unfixed for\nyears and the development is awfully slow.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.650"
    },
    {
        "id": 7990600,
        "hacker": "feld",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 13,
        "comment": "It did not explode. The scattered batteries burned. There was no explosion.\n\nStop with the stupid sensationalism.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.800"
    },
    {
        "id": 13744083,
        "hacker": "feld",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 13,
        "comment": "Why not release sooner and document the code smells? Maybe you'll get patches\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15024285,
        "hacker": "bonniemuffin",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 14,
        "comment": "\"Only boring people get bored.\" -my dad, every time I whined about being bored\nas a kid.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 21214786,
        "hacker": "bonniemuffin",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 14,
        "comment": "It sets the entire field back by creating a lot of fear and bad press that\ndiscourages further research.\n\nThis example is from institutional research rather than an indie biohacker,\nbut Jesse Gelsinger's death may have set back the field of gene therapy by\nmany years due to fear (some realistic and some unrealistic).\nhttps://www.sciencehistory.org/distillations/the-death-of-je...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.066"
    },
    {
        "id": 16330618,
        "hacker": "bonniemuffin",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 14,
        "comment": "The only way to get your inmap now is to apply for a job. You get a printout\nof your inmap when you do an on-site interview.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 1063772,
        "hacker": "techiferous",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 15,
        "comment": "That's because the author is not generalizing from the case of Cameroon. He's\ngeneralizing from his years of experience in economics and using Cameroon as a\nreal-life example to get his points across.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 1390468,
        "hacker": "techiferous",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 15,
        "comment": "any...day...now.\n\nLike tomorrow? http://www.quitfacebookday.com/\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 1544477,
        "hacker": "techiferous",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 15,
        "comment": "You've got the wrong post. Move your comment over here:\nhttp://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=1544351\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 11272688,
        "hacker": "richardboegli",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 16,
        "comment": "If the Razer blade stealth had a 16/32gb option I'd pick it over a Alienware\n13 or XPS 13\n\nhttp://www.razerzone.com/gaming-systems/razer-blade-stealth\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10263335,
        "hacker": "richardboegli",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 16,
        "comment": "What is needed is a small sized amplifier box using thunderbolt 3.\n\nIf something could be built around an AMD Radeon R9 Nano, then it would be a\nserious force to be reckoned with.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.292"
    },
    {
        "id": 10643779,
        "hacker": "richardboegli",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 16,
        "comment": "Attend Indie game conferences.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 20328896,
        "hacker": "lonelappde",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 17,
        "comment": "What actually happens is that the roads get clogged by all the people in cars,\nand then no one want to ride buses because if you are stuck in traffic anyway,\nwhy also add an extra 15-30min waiting for a bus to be stuck in traffic behind\nother people's cars?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.131"
    },
    {
        "id": 20597184,
        "hacker": "lonelappde",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 17,
        "comment": "Why do people say London density is so bad when there are homes with trees\nonly 45min away?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.350"
    },
    {
        "id": 20600212,
        "hacker": "lonelappde",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 17,
        "comment": "Done.\n\namp.dev/documentation/guides-and-tutorials/learn/spec/amphtml/\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 1850786,
        "hacker": "eof",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 18,
        "comment": "You should be getting back to normal soon. That's a lot of coffee, are you not\nexperiencing heavy withdrawal?\n\nI would definitely have a headache after stopping that much caffeine.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.030"
    },
    {
        "id": 5583461,
        "hacker": "eof",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 18,
        "comment": "oh no! i read that wrong everytime. In my said it said \"it takes you to send\nthis payment\".\n\nbut yes, they have been taking pre-orders for like 9 months and people have\nbeen paying.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 6805068,
        "hacker": "eof",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 18,
        "comment": "If you've been paying attention for the last three years, almost everyone\nthought the US government would crack down on bitcoin with a vengence, satoshi\nvery well may have been genuinely fearful of the ramifications of his\nsoftware.\n\nIt is also possible that satoshi is a group of people and not a person.\n\nLastly, the idiosyncratic nature of someone who spends their time on crypto\nmailing lists and making crypto currency is likely to take privacy seriously\nfor its own sake.\n\nA better question might be, why would satoshi _want_ to be found out?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.009"
    },
    {
        "id": 15259801,
        "hacker": "carapace",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 19,
        "comment": "> the amount of labor required is totally unsustainable to feed billions of\n> people.\n\nI disagree: in a well-designed system there may be a lot of labor in the\nbeginning, but it should fall off within a year or two to a very low level,\nmuch lower than conventional farming.\n\n(I admit a lot of \"Permies\" don't seem to set it up this way.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.014"
    },
    {
        "id": 17560213,
        "hacker": "carapace",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 19,
        "comment": "(Cheers for asking! I've been wondering about that too, ever since reading\nit.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 17962637,
        "hacker": "carapace",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 19,
        "comment": "Bezos is going to space.\n\nHe's ruthless as hell but he dosen't force anyone to work for him, he doesn't\nforce anyone to use his service.\n\nMaybe, just maybe, he's that man who sold the Moon.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-1.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18098496,
        "hacker": "carapace",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 19,
        "comment": "Dang, you're right and I'm sorry. I won't do it again and I'm gonna give\nmyself a 24 cool-down period before I post on HN again (on any subject.) I let\nmy passions get the better of me and I should have known better.\n\nBetween you and me, I pulled a muscle in my neck/shoulder this morning and\nI've been in a devil of a mood all day. I'm not trying to make excuses, I\nshouldn't have taken out my bad mood here. Today's B.S. is not indicative of\nmy best efforts.\n\nHN is an incredible forum (I interacted with Alan Kay the other day!!!) and\nI'm ashamed to have added such counter-productive negativity. It won't happen\nagain.\n\nI'm sorry for being part of the problem today. Have a great weekend.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.156"
    },
    {
        "id": 21169517,
        "hacker": "carapace",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 19,
        "comment": "I think it's a concomitant aspect of civilization itself. I mean, it's only\nwhat? 12K years since we started living in towns, right? Despite it's\nadvantages civilized life kinda sucks in general. I think people long for the\npre-civilized \"Golden Age\" and that's the underlying root of the apocalyptic\nlonging for the world to end.\n\n(I'm not saying that pre-civilized life was an actual Golden Age, just that it\nsatisfied us on a deep biological level in a way that urban/civil life\ndoesn't.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.098"
    },
    {
        "id": 20245454,
        "hacker": "carapace",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 19,
        "comment": "I think folks are missing your point, which (I think) is something like:\n\nI don't care if that car is faster if it is already on fire.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 10778240,
        "hacker": "alistairSH",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 20,
        "comment": "Not in the US. Public schools are funded and managed by the local governments\n(usually county or city). So, only residents of those locales get to attend.\n\nYou could send a child to a private school in the suburbs, but that's doesn't\ngain you anything over sending the kid to a private school closer to home.\nPlus, it costs an additional $6000+/year. That's tuition at my local Catholic\nhigh school; it's an average school, no better than the publics in the same\narea.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.041"
    },
    {
        "id": 16834909,
        "hacker": "alistairSH",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 20,
        "comment": "Oof. I knew those policies existed. But if it’s truly 99%, out system is well\nand truly broken.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 19721744,
        "hacker": "alistairSH",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 20,
        "comment": "For anybody who hasn't seen it, here's some video of \"hanging off the side of\nthe boat\" in a trapeze... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8NwT9JBQJk\n\nPerfectly normal on faster small-to-midsize boats (usually double-handed\nracing dinghies). The body weight and extra leverage helps keep the boat from\ncapsizing. Some boats have only the crew in the trapeze, others have crew and\ncaptain.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 11262685,
        "hacker": "nikolay",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 21,
        "comment": "Optional, alright, but promoting bad practices. If people like dumb-down\nlanguages, there are plenty of them already!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.875"
    },
    {
        "id": 11734454,
        "hacker": "nikolay",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 21,
        "comment": "Why GDAX?! You want to be the new wave, but to sound like the old crooks?!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.220"
    },
    {
        "id": 17880162,
        "hacker": "nikolay",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 21,
        "comment": "The entire world knows XS is 'extra small'. These cryptic abbreviations should\nstop. I've always wondered why Samsung's flagship is called 'Galaxy S#'.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 10965928,
        "hacker": "nikolay",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 21,
        "comment": "And this is the proper way of doing things in 2016! Thanks!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 9188641,
        "hacker": "Buge",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 22,
        "comment": "Here's what the sentence is saying:\n\nThere are people who aren't like me who are hackers. Also there are people who\nare like me who aren't hackers.\n\nThe list of people who aren't like her is: progressive, libertarian,\nanarchist, moderate, communist, conservative, liberal, and reactionary.\n\nThe list of people who are like her is: women, bisexuals, Texans, or\nengineers.\n\nWhy else would she come up with 4 random traits? They obviously have something\nin common: they describe her.\n\nThe \"who aren't hackers\" part doesn't apply directly to engineers. It applies\nto the entire list. So if you were to parenthesize it to show precedence it\nwould be \"(women, bisexuals, Texans, or engineers) who aren’t hackers.\" Not\n\"women, bisexuals, Texans, or (engineers who aren’t hackers).\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.117"
    },
    {
        "id": 16557447,
        "hacker": "Buge",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 22,
        "comment": "Unfortunately there don't appear to be subtitles.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 17151381,
        "hacker": "Buge",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 22,
        "comment": "I don't think causing a stir should be a goal. Trump caused quite a stir with\nhis early immigration policies.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 13781868,
        "hacker": "Buge",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 22,
        "comment": "You need to double the size of the index. You now need an index with\npunctuation and without punctuation.\n\nPreviously if a document contained \"(hello\" it would just be stored in the\nindex once: as \"hello\". With this change, it needs to be stored in the index\ntwice, as \"(hello\" and \"hello\", so that people searching either term can find\nit.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 16236424,
        "hacker": "rdlecler1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 23,
        "comment": "This is. win-win for Elon. He’s already a billionaire so salary doesn’t move\nthe needle. At the same time it sends a message of confidence to investors. If\nhis net worth was $5m would he make the same bet?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.075"
    },
    {
        "id": 11136343,
        "hacker": "rdlecler1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 23,
        "comment": "Any non-Chinese company that insists on tying its fortune to the Chinese\nmarket is taking on tremendous risk. The goal posts are always changing , you\nneed to constantly worry about IP theft, you can easily get on the wrong side\nof the government, and they strongly protect local interests. Investment is\nwelcome, but as soon as you actually start making a lot of money and recouping\nyour investment some barrier of sorts is bound to appear and you'll be phased\nout in favor of a local player. This is going to come back to haunt China at a\ntime when growth is slowing and when they are going to need investment the\nmost.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 15152667,
        "hacker": "rdlecler1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 23,
        "comment": "The idea itself isn't horrible. But investing $100m in a niche home appliance\nthat hadn't yet been validated in the market was just dumb.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.688"
    },
    {
        "id": 9154408,
        "hacker": "maw",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 24,
        "comment": "I've said \"con permiso, abuelita\" \\-- roughly \"excuse me, grandma\" \\-- to\ndudes half my age waddling down the street.\n\nI should do it more.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.032"
    },
    {
        "id": 2213336,
        "hacker": "maw",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 24,
        "comment": "I think it's even worse than grey-on-black, which is an achievement of sorts.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 1639033,
        "hacker": "maw",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 24,
        "comment": "The bit about specifying the gender of one's neighbor sounds like the work of\nsomebody who knows just enough to be really wrong.\n\nMy French and German are weak, but Spanish has vecino/vecina, and you can\nequivocate easily enough by saying that you spent the evening with \"una\npersona que vive cerca\", and I'd be very surprised if you can't do similar in\nFrench or German. (\"Une personne qu'habite ne pas loin\" in French?)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.065"
    },
    {
        "id": 3502635,
        "hacker": "RexRollman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 25,
        "comment": "For pete's sake, Google, if I have to reveal my real name to you at any point,\nthen the policy equals fail.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 4838749,
        "hacker": "RexRollman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 25,
        "comment": "In my opinion, this is Apple's attempt to avoid taking responsibility for the\nproduct it approved and shipped. I find it disturbing that Apple will accept\nthe credit and not the blame.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 3075203,
        "hacker": "RexRollman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 25,
        "comment": "That's a real shame. I enjoyed reading his blog, especially during his\ntransition to Linux.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.233"
    },
    {
        "id": 13566292,
        "hacker": "wolf550e",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 26,
        "comment": "I that would be crazy. Instead of that, something like this:\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reaction_Engines_A2 might be doable.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.600"
    },
    {
        "id": 18235602,
        "hacker": "wolf550e",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 26,
        "comment": "They now run their python code using a transpiler into Go with a Go runtime\nand Go libraries: https://github.com/google/grumpy\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13364195,
        "hacker": "wolf550e",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 26,
        "comment": "The danger in your scheme is that an attacker who finds a way to see lots of\nkeyed hash values in one hash table can flood a different hash table. You\nshould keep a 16 byte key per hash table.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14288179,
        "hacker": "wolf550e",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 26,
        "comment": "SNC are building a small shuttle-like thing that lands gently on a runway.\nthey planned to build a crewed version, but lost the NASA competition to\nSpaceX and Boeing. They won a contract for cargo, with an unmanned variant,\npossibly because NASA is really interested in \"dissimilar redundancy\".\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dream_Chaser\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 6923390,
        "hacker": "smrtinsert",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 27,
        "comment": "After watching 2001 I believe Stanley Kubrick is a filmmakers filmmaker. I\nthink he is to Spielberg as Spielberg is to Abrams (or any other modern\npromising director)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.092"
    },
    {
        "id": 7212647,
        "hacker": "smrtinsert",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 27,
        "comment": "And what a depressing job that would be.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.600"
    },
    {
        "id": 17948640,
        "hacker": "smrtinsert",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 27,
        "comment": "This anecdote is just that. More details are needed to figure out why you\nhaving a hard time getting hired.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.104"
    },
    {
        "id": 7333827,
        "hacker": "morganvachon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 28,
        "comment": "That makes a lot of sense, thank you.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9674569,
        "hacker": "morganvachon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 28,
        "comment": "I'm not a huge fan of Apple, but I have to agree with you. Windows doesn't\n(yet[1]) have a built-in SSH client or server, even though OS X and Linux do.\nShould I sue Microsoft because it doesn't do one specific thing in software,\neven though the hardware allows it if I install another OS?\n\n[1] http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/06/micros...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 19562557,
        "hacker": "morganvachon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 28,
        "comment": "Amazon loses money on their online shopping. It is their consumer-facing\noffering so it grows their brand, while they make their money via services\nlike AWS.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 12845481,
        "hacker": "retube",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 29,
        "comment": "Secret Agent is where it's at!\n\nhttp://somafm.com/secretagent/\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 1435636,
        "hacker": "retube",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 29,
        "comment": "You've probably got the technical skills to work for one of these firms - but\nhave you thought about in what capacity? When you interview you'll need to be\npretty clued-up about what you want to do. Trading? Quant? Research? Strategy?\nAnd in what asset class(es)? To be a successful applicant you'll need to\ndemonstrate a genuine enthusiasm and knowledge for\ntrading/markets/pricing/modelling/risk (delete as appropriate).\n\nGetting in to these places is not easy, and working for them is harder. You\ncan do well, but those that do spectacularly well really make a lot of money\nfor their employer. You don't get paid a million bucks just for putting in\nyour 60 hours a week. You need to make 10 or 20 times this for your employee -\nand it's not easy. In fact it's very, very hard.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.162"
    },
    {
        "id": 10257998,
        "hacker": "retube",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 29,
        "comment": "Sorry but that's nonsense. It's a well known and indeed publically admitted\nstrategy by the Saudi's to drive US shale producers out of business. Google\n\"saudia arabia united states oil price\" for many authoritive hits on the\nsubject.\n\nRussia was collateral damage.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.056"
    },
    {
        "id": 14519928,
        "hacker": "qb45",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 30,
        "comment": "> crazy bad women\n\nThis stereotype doesn't come from nowhere.\n\nI found a video of this talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Er7qPv8jsZo\n\nThis \"push to Hubeny's field of expertise\" seems to start at 1:02:00, \"let her\nspeak\" is at 1:05:35.\n\nThe OP's account is overdramatized and sometimes plain wrong, like the\nsuggestion that Holt didn't let Hubeny speak at all for these three minutes\n(she had two long blocks) or that there was a dead silence after the OP spoke\nup (there wasn't). And that's a part of the problem: feminism is routinely\nbeing represented by individuals whose subjective perception of events seems\nto diverge from what others see. FWIW.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.377"
    },
    {
        "id": 11102161,
        "hacker": "qb45",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 30,
        "comment": "That's fine if you don't mind the time that could have been spent on something\nyou actually cared about.\n\nSometimes it happened that school attempted to teach me something I was\ninterested in and I ended up understanding it. At other times, however, it all\nwent to /dev/null.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.088"
    },
    {
        "id": 11776232,
        "hacker": "qb45",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 30,
        "comment": "> Greeks even estimated the circumference of the thing.\n\nThat's not a problem, the story was that the Greeks knew but those European\nbarbarians didn't believe them until Columbus claimed that he reached India.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14690229,
        "hacker": "qb45",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 30,
        "comment": "... and even if you deliver 100% of your 175% commitment, I have a somewhat\ndark and cynical hypothesis that the manager may secretly feel guilty about\noverworking you and resolve this guilt by downplaying your achievements.\n\nMerely feeling or behaving like a doormat for no reason will make many people\naround uneasy. Any situation that shows you somehow deserve it, relieves them.\nIf they aren't self-aware enough to recognize this, congratulations, you are\ntraining them to exploit you.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.236"
    },
    {
        "id": 9282382,
        "hacker": "iopq",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 31,
        "comment": "What did I just read? I don't even know what the gum is referring to. This\narticle assumes that I know something about Singapore. I don't. I have no idea\nwhat I'm reading.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12974422,
        "hacker": "iopq",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 31,
        "comment": "> The All Lives Matter movement, as a reaction to BLM, is essentially saying\n> that they don't\n\nThat's not what \"all\" means. It's turning the name of the movement by implying\nit means \"only\" Black Lives Matter. So All Lives Matter is saying that not\nonly Black Lives Matter.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.067"
    },
    {
        "id": 7276997,
        "hacker": "iopq",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 31,
        "comment": "Humans have a natural response to vomit. Things that are vomited out may be\nspoiled foods or contain bacteria from the person who vomited it. This is why\nvomit is disgusting to humans.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.450"
    },
    {
        "id": 4711237,
        "hacker": "iopq",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 31,
        "comment": "In the US \"Asian\" means \"East Asian\" exclusively, I believe that's what he\nmeant\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15491432,
        "hacker": "madaxe_again",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 32,
        "comment": "Well, if he had a lungful if air, blowing would work - after all, rockets _do_\nwork in a vacuum.\n\nThat said, he’s drunk, so the answer is to piss into the luminiferous aether.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.254"
    },
    {
        "id": 10219919,
        "hacker": "madaxe_again",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 32,
        "comment": "I'm confused as to how you could get anything but 26/26...\n\nThe tunes which are \"wrong\" aren't subtly off, they're grossly distorted - to\nthe degree where on some of them it's hard to tell what the tune was meant to\nbe, but you know that you're listening to some kind of godawful mess, and the\nanswer must therefore be \"No\".\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.157"
    },
    {
        "id": 10909141,
        "hacker": "madaxe_again",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 32,
        "comment": "Well, as they're officially not used at all in the UK, there's been no need to\ncreate any legislation around them, so while this could be an offence under\nthe communications act, you could argue (probably unsuccessfully) that you're\nactually providing a service to customers by taking their data to protect them\nfrom themselves, as they may be terrorists and not yet know it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18304619,
        "hacker": "madaxe_again",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 32,
        "comment": "Except it really isn’t - it’s an output of an ML algo designed for one task,\nwhich I’d hesitate to call AI.\n\nI had my portrait painted by a robot with a camera and some variety of edge-\nfinding DSP at the London Science Museum in about 1990 - and they touted that\nas “AI art”.\n\nAlso - what about Conway’s game of life? Is that not art?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 7740384,
        "hacker": "korzun",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 33,
        "comment": "Finally somebody who gets it.\n\nFor everybody else, Google Georgian conflict and compare it to what's going on\nin Ukraine.\n\nHint: US tried to back Georgian military in a proxy attack and got shut down.\n\nIf you don't think it's a bis suspicious for US to be so actively involved in\nthis I have a bridge to sell you.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.078"
    },
    {
        "id": 8359104,
        "hacker": "korzun",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 33,
        "comment": "What a start-up horror story.\n\n> At least Clinkle employs 128-bit AES encryption\n\nThis is ground breaking.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 7178391,
        "hacker": "korzun",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 33,
        "comment": "https://github.com/michelf/php-markdown\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15554025,
        "hacker": "AceJohnny2",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 34,
        "comment": "In California, the employer can state that I'm not allowed to later work for a\ncompetitor. However, non-competes are not enforceable in California, unlike\nWashington for example.\n\nContract law has limits, and those limits differ on a state-by-state basis.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15792511,
        "hacker": "AceJohnny2",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 34,
        "comment": "> The job’s listed goal: “ _To adopt an alias persona_ , gain access to an\n> identified person of interest and persuade that person to reveal\n> information.”\n\nYeah, way to fuck that one up. She's burned.\n\nBut I'm afraid this is just the beginning.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 7307068,
        "hacker": "AceJohnny2",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 34,
        "comment": "Doesn't work in Chrome Beta (33.0.1750.117) Ubuntu either.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 17212201,
        "hacker": "AceJohnny2",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 34,
        "comment": "I wonder if there have actually been 15M 256GB microSD cards even manufactured\nat this stage.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9889502,
        "hacker": "comrh",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 35,
        "comment": "I thought it was just downloading favicons? Is the POST request suppose to be\nsending stuff?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7415677,
        "hacker": "comrh",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 35,
        "comment": "That's a definition of feminism and exposes how the term is completely\npointless to use to attack people because of how vague the definition is.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.375"
    },
    {
        "id": 9965478,
        "hacker": "comrh",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 35,
        "comment": "Yes, the point still stands.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10121385,
        "hacker": "tdkl",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 36,
        "comment": "Please bring Safari back to Windows, we're running out of options here :[.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.375"
    },
    {
        "id": 13014958,
        "hacker": "tdkl",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 36,
        "comment": "Google phones are Nexus and Pixel series and I'm willing to bet those aren't\nthe majority sold. Data collection happens nevertheless the device.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 12791677,
        "hacker": "tdkl",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 36,
        "comment": "Unlocking the bootloader means loosing the DRM keys forever which results in\nworse camera. Also binaries are the issue for custom ROM support - as usual\nfor Android.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.325"
    },
    {
        "id": 10919325,
        "hacker": "tdkl",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 36,
        "comment": "Despite I didn't like the 8.x because of the UI decisions and same with 10\nwhich also forced telemetry, I agree with you. Both versions are actually an\nimprovement vs. Windows 7. Which is the most sad part, because if they didn't\nwent ape shit into the \"one UI to rule the all\" and \"all your data are belong\nto us\" mentality, the system would be pretty awesome. The closest now is the\nLTSB Enterprise edition, without the Metro crap and manageable telemetry and\nspyware. Even MS describes it as \"system for mission critical computers\".\n\nSorry Mr. Nadella, I thought that the PC my niece bought with her money is\nmission critical enough to work when expected, without being rendered\nunbootable with dodgy updates.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.046"
    },
    {
        "id": 3240910,
        "hacker": "ketralnis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 37,
        "comment": "I can't speak to NetBSD, but FreeBSD doesn't put any user-installed programs\nin /bin or /usr/bin, they all go into /usr/local. Since bash isn't distributed\nas part of the base system, it goes into /usr/local/bin/bash\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.800"
    },
    {
        "id": 10245764,
        "hacker": "ketralnis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 37,
        "comment": "Are there any released games written using it yet?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10683832,
        "hacker": "ketralnis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 37,
        "comment": "San Francisco\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 197296,
        "hacker": "ketralnis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 37,
        "comment": "I strongly recommend emacs with erlang-mode over vi for Erlang editing. I was\na 100% vi user before I started with Erlang, and I can tell you that using\nemacs for editing Erlang is _so_ much more fluid.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.311"
    },
    {
        "id": 11633545,
        "hacker": "Gibbon1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 38,
        "comment": "Probably costs $3000/mo for a driver. $2000/mo capital costs. Ditch the driver\nand increase the miles traveled from 10,000 to 20,000 miles.\n\nMonthly costs,\n\n    \n    \n        Capital $2000     $2500\n        Driver  $3000       ---\n        Fuel    $5000    $10000\n        Total  $10000    $12500\n        Miles   10000     20000\n        $/mile  $1.00     $0.63\n    \n\nCost reduction of 37%\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19883678,
        "hacker": "Gibbon1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 38,
        "comment": "I'm also thinking a 93 year old with bad eyes. My grandmother in her late 80's\ncould thread a sewing needle by feel.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 18540631,
        "hacker": "Gibbon1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 38,
        "comment": "Combine the Federal Governments fiscal stimulus with state an local austerity\nand they balance each other out.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.062"
    },
    {
        "id": 19721107,
        "hacker": "Gibbon1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 38,
        "comment": "Because the observability you get with a print statement is limited. You can't\ndo further investigation without modifying the code and running it again. With\na debugger you can explore the program state interactively.\n\nMy experience with python is limited but in my day job it's not uncommon to be\ntracking down stuff that happens infrequently. Debug cycles get brutally long.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 17243533,
        "hacker": "Gibbon1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 38,
        "comment": "Could bolt on actual arrays, but we'd need grab a shovel and take the C\nstandards committee members out behind the barn first.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 17063604,
        "hacker": "Gibbon1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 38,
        "comment": "This reminds me of an IBM paper I read in the late 1970's.\n\nThe authors had designed an ALU that could perform calculations on words with\nerror correcting codes. So instead o just protecting against bit errors from\ndata read from memory the processor could handle bit errors that occurred in\nregisters and the ALU itself.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 14427650,
        "hacker": "Gibbon1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 38,
        "comment": "> It has always stroked me as weird that USA never saw the inherent liberalist\n> advantage of simple measurement system.\n\nI read a claim somewhere that the pox of different measurement systems wasn't\nas much of an issue in Britain and it's American colonies so they stuck with\narchaic but consistent units a lot longer.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.008"
    },
    {
        "id": 19461833,
        "hacker": "PavlovsCat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 39,
        "comment": "> Is trying to obtain intelligence information from the enemy an inherently\n> evil activity?\n\nIn a war of aggression it very much is.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.370"
    },
    {
        "id": 18401898,
        "hacker": "PavlovsCat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 39,
        "comment": "The wider costs of people lacking media literacy and the ability to think\ncritically are harder to measure, but I would suspect them to be vast.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.033"
    },
    {
        "id": 6882335,
        "hacker": "PavlovsCat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 39,
        "comment": "> No, what it implies is that those who intend to do evil against America\n> cannot hide anywhere in the world.\n\nDefine \"evil\" and \"America\"? Seeing how war profiteers sending off your young\ninto wars, and making everyone else pay for toys that are just as mind\nboggingly expensive as they are mind boggingly useless for anything but murder\nand control, doesn't seem to either count as \"evil\" or as perpetrating it\nagainst \"America\".\n\n> we still have elections\n\nOh yeah. \"Hope And Change! Now That I Got This Fuck You\". Rinse, repeat.\n\n> aren't sending political prisoners to siberia\n\nNo, you send them to Gitmo or black sites. Snowden is stuck in Russia. Manning\ngot tortured right at home.\n\n> we haven't killed tens of millions of our own people\n\nWell, the private prison industry is more profitable, is it not?\nhttp://www.inthepublicinterest.org/blog/%E2%80%9Clockup-quot...\n\nIndeed, why kill people when you can milk them? Murdering millions of people\nis very low tech, and unless, you use very expensive weaponry others pay for,\njust not profitable. From a capitalistic viewpoint it's plain dumb. I think\nthat explains more than any \"values\" you might think are present at higher\necholons of power.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.180"
    },
    {
        "id": 5998797,
        "hacker": "PavlovsCat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 39,
        "comment": "He's an American citizen. He's not responsible for what _your_ government\ndoes.\n\nIt's also really ironic for people who aren't whistleblowers to criticize the\nlimited options of whisteblowers.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.007"
    },
    {
        "id": 21512644,
        "hacker": "PavlovsCat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 39,
        "comment": "Noam Chomsky about the lack of continuity:\nhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5meC4Z61qGg&t=15m45s\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18597854,
        "hacker": "Piskvorrr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 40,
        "comment": "Yup. Alas, that's not a feature, that's a gaping security hole. (Had the\nmisfortune of working on a HTA e-mail client. Turns out, some of the VBS\nviruses of the age were executable in HTA context...hilarity ensued.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 6142824,
        "hacker": "Piskvorrr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 40,
        "comment": "I'd rather wish for a good update...we've had too many bad updates so far ;)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.170"
    },
    {
        "id": 10887507,
        "hacker": "Piskvorrr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 40,
        "comment": "Seems to be working - boots up to language selection (which I believe is a\n\"normal\" app), but won't let me choose any - mouse clicks register for\nlanguage selection, but not for the \"next\" button, keyboard: nada :( Cursor\nonly updates on LMB held down (with mouse integration and without). I think\nthere's more work to come back to desktop-ish user expectations.\n\nW7, x64, VBox 5.0.2, Windows guest w/ 1 GB RAM\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.037"
    },
    {
        "id": 15191747,
        "hacker": "Piskvorrr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 40,
        "comment": "From six seconds to eight decades. (Seriously, that's one step of vagueness\nfrom \"how long does it take to build an application?\")\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.192"
    },
    {
        "id": 1348622,
        "hacker": "maukdaddy",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 41,
        "comment": "Do we get an apology from all the Gizmodo apologists who ran around with\npitchforks and torches against Apple?\n\nedit: To all the people who screamed that Apple was just being an evil\ncorporation when they executed a search warrant:\n\n _Hogan's roommate cooperated fully with authorities and assisted them when\nHogan and an acquaintance removed several pieces of evidence from his\napartment. The evidence, which included a desktop computer, USB flash drive\nand memory card, and stickers from the iPhone prototype, were found in a\nchurch, under a bush, and in a gas station parking lot._\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 1532533,
        "hacker": "maukdaddy",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 41,
        "comment": "I wish that both CS and MBA programs taught students to listen more. One of\nthe few similarities I find between programmers/engineers and MBAs is the need\nto completely dominate a conversation. A few seminars on active listening\nwould help everyone :)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.094"
    },
    {
        "id": 1347632,
        "hacker": "maukdaddy",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 41,
        "comment": " _sigh_\n\nOutside of HN and the tech community, the general public doesn't give a SHIT\nabout this kind of argument. Adobe can try to shape public opinion all day\nlong, and it won't matter in the end. The only way they can survive is\ncreating innovative products. Lately, they seem completely incapable of doing\nthat.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.064"
    },
    {
        "id": 7639925,
        "hacker": "shocks",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 42,
        "comment": "I highly doubt you have anything else to add because I'm sure you're just\nanother person jumping on the \"hate php\" bandwagon - but go on, entertain me.\n\nPlease elaborate.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.090"
    },
    {
        "id": 5502492,
        "hacker": "shocks",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 42,
        "comment": "Can someone tell me why some of the players keycaps are missing in the APM\nvideo?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 5694959,
        "hacker": "shocks",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 42,
        "comment": "You're one of the luck few of us that actually understand the joke. There is a\nvery large portion of people in this thread that do not understand the\nswearing and are simply 'offended' by fuck all and are throwing their toys out\nof the pram because of a few fucking words.\n\nSimply put, in this instance it is acceptable to explain the joke because a\nlarge percentage of people are pathetic fuckwads.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.191"
    },
    {
        "id": 6801390,
        "hacker": "shocks",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 42,
        "comment": "No. Deterministic wallets just a _bad_ idea. By using a deterministic wallet\nit becomes infinitely easier to brute force and your funds are at substantial\nrisk. Even if you think you're using a strong password. There are already\npeople spending a lot of computational power to build rainbow tables of brain\nwallets.\n\nPlease do not encourage people to use deterministic wallets, you are doing\nthem a disservice.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 3594742,
        "hacker": "starwed",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 43,
        "comment": "Wikipedia has explicitly adopted the opposite policy, and they didn't do so\narbitrarily.\n\nIn specific cases it might seem stupid, but I think in general it makes sense.\nIt goes hand in hand with the \"no original research\" policy.\n\n(Like everything in wikipedia that policy can be misapplied by small minded\npeople, though.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.198"
    },
    {
        "id": 2731734,
        "hacker": "starwed",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 43,
        "comment": "Well, consider how the idiom works. It is asking us to consider a\nrepresentative sample of four teens, and makes a statement about one of them.\nThat's different than if you said \"only 25% of teens are employed\".\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3060736,
        "hacker": "starwed",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 43,
        "comment": "This is the worst sort of comment -- blanket assertion of a controversial yet\nvague idea, no actual arguments, no specific statements, nothing to discuss.\n\nIt's just as much noise as reddit-style joke threads. Those don't seem to be\ntolerated here, and neither should comments like this.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 6691368,
        "hacker": "jacalata",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 44,
        "comment": "Your point was to make a foolishly broad generalization that \"all non-white\npeople are like this\"? I'm glad I could prove you wrong in at least one small\ninstance.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.098"
    },
    {
        "id": 8419496,
        "hacker": "jacalata",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 44,
        "comment": "I disagree with the article that it is \"besides the point\" if Conal did try\nand use his employers name unethically. Sure, Comcast sucks, should have done\ntheir job properly, and he wasn't trying to get any unethical special _result_\n\\- but you could say the same about a scenario where someone goes into a\nComcast store and beats up a rep while trying to get their hundreds of service\nfailures dealt with. Either he didn't do anything wrong and Comcast lied to\nhis employer to make it appear he had, or he did do something that is a firing\noffense and it probably doesn't matter to his employer if he was provoked into\nbreaking their ethics policy or not. (Or, I suppose, his company wanted to\nfire him anyway and is colluding with Comcast on the story...)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.010"
    },
    {
        "id": 14987504,
        "hacker": "jacalata",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 44,
        "comment": "I don't, but people who believe one silly thing often believe others so I\nthought you might. Let's go with some other examples: open source software.\nBreastfeeding. Ooh, how about literally every person in America under 10 years\nold? They're all worthless and society wouldn't be negatively affected if they\ndisappeared out of existence? After all, close enough to 0 of them are being\npaid by anyone.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.232"
    },
    {
        "id": 21157663,
        "hacker": "ineedasername",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 45,
        "comment": "Yep, a few hours searching garage sales will usually find one too, though\ntransport can then be an issue. Either way, if you're a startup, between\ngarage sales, use furniture stores, and craigslist you can spend a day or so\nscouring the area and probably find a dozen desks. If you need to, rent a\nUhaul for $100 for transport. Sure, nothing will match, but if you're a cash-\npoor startup trying to get a round of VC, fancy offices shouldn't really be a\nfocus.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.058"
    },
    {
        "id": 15999557,
        "hacker": "ineedasername",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 45,
        "comment": "France, Germany, Canada, US, Australia... many or all of the most advanced\nwestern nations have positive avg gdp around 1.5 to 2% and positive population\ngrowth as well. These are not the primary factors behind failing pension\nsystems. In nearly all cases it ends up that those in charge dont make the\nrequired payments. In my home state that is the issue: had the mandated\npayments been made there would be no crisis. The state broke its own contract\nand dissobeyed a court order to fund unrelated discretionary spending. The\nmajor private pension failures have been similarly aflicted, executive flee a\nbankrupt company with agregate golden parachutes measured in hundreds of\nmillions but the pension fund was ignored with underpayments for decades.\n\nOur retirement systems are broken, and part of it stems from their own\nexcessive costs, but there is no sinhle cause here, its a complex issue with\ncomplex causes, and shifting demographics and economic growth are only very\nminor factors. Bad policy, cynical politics and budget shenanigans, self\ninterested executives, and simple incompetence and hobest mistakes all play\nthe bigger part.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 18704134,
        "hacker": "ineedasername",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 45,
        "comment": "Me too, I didn't even mean to read your comment, but as soon as my eyes saw\nit: boom, processed and read. like a computer without virus scan or security\nor anything, to see the words was to run their executable on my wetware.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.312"
    },
    {
        "id": 19809173,
        "hacker": "will4274",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 46,
        "comment": "> Democrats aren’t in favor of open borders\n\nCitation needed. Cutting the enforcement budget for border patrol to zero (as\nJulian Castro proposes) is open borders in all but name.\n\n> It’s dishonest and in bad faith\n\n... To pretend that some Democrats aren't for open borders.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.267"
    },
    {
        "id": 16031407,
        "hacker": "will4274",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 46,
        "comment": "I'm 25. I make about $150k. My father would never tell me how much money he\nmakes (\"it's rude to talk about money\") but he probably makes at least double\nwhat I make. My mother doesn't work.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 18051572,
        "hacker": "will4274",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 46,
        "comment": "> simply offers a deal that Qualcomm can choose to accept or not\n\nWith China's culture of corruption, \"or not\" comes with a giant asterisk of\n\"will face harassment from the communist party\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 9352509,
        "hacker": "rodgerd",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 47,
        "comment": "> In a competitive market for investment performance, managers should charge\n> fees equal to their outperformance.\n\nThen what's the value in a fund manager instead of a simple algorithm that\nfollows the market? Would you hire an employee and pay them the entirety of\nthe value they generate for your business?\n\nWhat a preposterous argument.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11295378,
        "hacker": "rodgerd",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 47,
        "comment": "> I'm always surprised at the lack of enthusiasm for VR and AR on HN.\n\n\"Less storage than a Nomad. Lame.\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.189"
    },
    {
        "id": 9958199,
        "hacker": "rodgerd",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 47,
        "comment": "Microsoft should be all over it. Apple's products need less of a boost.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 9950398,
        "hacker": "rodgerd",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 47,
        "comment": "> Well, Switzerland still ranks very high in terms of gun ownership. (4th\n> place in the world)\n\nIf you're insisting that the situation with firearms in Switzerland resembles\nthat of the US you are either ignorant, obtuse, or dishonest. They are not\neven remotely comparable.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.064"
    },
    {
        "id": 6689015,
        "hacker": "TillE",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 48,
        "comment": "Am I missing something, or does Stack Overflow really have this marked as a\nduplicate without actually linking to the earlier question? That's not very\nhelpful.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6538279,
        "hacker": "TillE",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 48,
        "comment": "Seriously. I can at least block them on my desktop browser, but I've\naccidentally hit that button a few times on the Android store.\n\nIt's just a symptom, though. The whole modern conception of \"social\nnetworking\" can't die soon enough.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.057"
    },
    {
        "id": 11382271,
        "hacker": "TillE",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 48,
        "comment": "Indeed. See for example the horrific state of Reddit over the past few years,\nas racist \"jokes\" became the norm.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.483"
    },
    {
        "id": 11415919,
        "hacker": "TillE",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 48,
        "comment": "The partition is the full size. It's just mostly empty.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 4318020,
        "hacker": "emmett",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 49,
        "comment": "Speaking as someone who uses a ton of mixpanel in production\n(http://www.twitch.tv/) the way you handle this is to make all your calls\nasynchronous.\n\nI am bummed that we are going to have missing data though :-(\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.475"
    },
    {
        "id": 613889,
        "hacker": "emmett",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 49,
        "comment": "http://lmgtfy.com/?q=python+web+frameworks&l=1\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 671398,
        "hacker": "emmett",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 49,
        "comment": "Mind blowing ideas on probability theory (perhaps new only to me). A quote on\nthe ideas applied:\n\nShould we, in salary discrimination cases, compare salaries of equally\nqualified men and women, or, instead, compare qualifications of equally paid\nmen and women? Remarkably, the two choices led to opposite conclusions. It\nturned out that men earned a higher salary than equally qualified women, and\nSIMULTANEOUSLY, men were more qualified than equally paid women.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.164"
    },
    {
        "id": 10173124,
        "hacker": "TD-Linux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 50,
        "comment": "Neat, it's too bad they seem to be tying it into some awful software and\nmapping system. Just sell the part that you're good at and let other people do\nthe software!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.289"
    },
    {
        "id": 8833436,
        "hacker": "TD-Linux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 50,
        "comment": "Why can't you migrate your music collection away from iTunes? I thought the\nDRM was killed long ago.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 11811581,
        "hacker": "TD-Linux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 50,
        "comment": "It's already on by default in Firefox Nightly, so I suspect it will be shipped\nby the time such a port is made.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14914135,
        "hacker": "TD-Linux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 50,
        "comment": "They are just trading their internal accounting of BCH, by crediting BTC\nholders with BCH. Nothing is hitting the blockchain.\n\nBitfinex did this too, but royally screwed up:\nhttp://hackingdistributed.com/2017/07/29/bitcoin-impending-a...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14028481,
        "hacker": "gumby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 51,
        "comment": "This is tangental but: Now the term \"bare metal\" has been co-opted to mean\n\"uses an O/S but no virtualization\" what are those of us who run our software\non bare metal supposed to call what we do?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.071"
    },
    {
        "id": 14235660,
        "hacker": "gumby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 51,
        "comment": "The article describes an alternative interpretation.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14397011,
        "hacker": "gumby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 51,
        "comment": "I was annoyed that they replaced the buggy product with _a different product_\nbut then wanted me to leave a favorable review on the bad one. I asked if this\nis really what they wanted and customer support said yes. This is a shame.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.225"
    },
    {
        "id": 14707539,
        "hacker": "gumby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 51,
        "comment": "Not to mention, if you talk to anyone who was in theatre, how they were\ntreated while actually in the war. There's been massive profiteering _at the\nexpense of the troops._\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18201244,
        "hacker": "gumby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 51,
        "comment": "Part of the origin of this “belief” was to justify things like neonatal\nsurgery (e.g. heart valve repair for “blue babies”) when there were no good\nanesthesia protocols for newborns. Hard to do the job that you feel is saving\nthe kids life if you are making them suffer.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.214"
    },
    {
        "id": 18661810,
        "hacker": "gumby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 51,
        "comment": "> Would an Australian employee of 1Password be forced to lie to us and do\n> something that we would definitely object to?\n\nThis law is a disaster for Australia's software industry (sorry Atlassian) but\nas an Australian living and working outside Australia I can't see that I would\nbe subject to it.\n\nAustralia is notoriously punitive to Aussies overseas (quite different from,\nsay, India) so it would hardly make sense for such a stupid law to apply to us\n-- unless the US demanded it I suppose (this whole law is clearly a 5 eyes\neffort).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.135"
    },
    {
        "id": 19629990,
        "hacker": "gumby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 51,
        "comment": "I like the part where they complain bitterly that people they called stupid,\nlazy leeches won't go along with boycotts of, say, Iran or Huawei, just\nbecause they were told to.\n\nI learnt in the third grade that that approach doesn't work.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.287"
    },
    {
        "id": 19886477,
        "hacker": "gumby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 51,
        "comment": "WARNING: this page has a dangerous typo. _do not put '.' in your path_.\n\n\"This is similar to the confusion I felt when I realised the dot folder was\nnot included in my more familiar PATH variable… but you should _[not]_ do that\nin the PATH variable because you can get tricked into running a ‘fake’ command\nfrom some downloaded code.\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.045"
    },
    {
        "id": 21456073,
        "hacker": "gumby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 51,
        "comment": "I don't know if you mean formatting, in which case I don't believe anything\nhas changed (pretty much anything goes) but yes, you can now do for (auto [x,\ny] : list_of_coordinates()) ... and things like that.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.046"
    },
    {
        "id": 19304533,
        "hacker": "anovikov",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 52,
        "comment": "Something is wrong here, why is the probability of exit is lower for C than\nfor B stage and B stage lower than for A stage company?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 9804814,
        "hacker": "anovikov",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 52,
        "comment": "Bad that it is delayed by 5 months, a year ago it was planned to happen since\nmid January 2017. Good that they also introduced another intermediate tariff\nreduction since April 2016, which gets calls cheaper by at least 4x. After\nthis, personally i will no longer care about what it costs, it is cheap\nenough.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.014"
    },
    {
        "id": 16952346,
        "hacker": "anovikov",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 52,
        "comment": "True, i've been doing this shit several times in my life now, from all ends -\nstarting with being 'offshore labor' and ending with being a CTO - all it\nresonates well with my feelings.\n\nWorst part of it is that, after many years doing this, you get cynical. You\nstarts to feel like every company is a bunch of fools burning money of another\nbunch of even bigger fools, and let it happen as long as money ends in my\npocket.\n\nRight now i don't think i can even think of doing coding as some 'real' thing,\nwhich is, done with a real intention of succeeding and bringing in revenue.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.026"
    },
    {
        "id": 21302575,
        "hacker": "anovikov",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 52,
        "comment": "It keeps striking me. Really have no idea how this crap could be happening. Is\nthat a consequence of democracy? But none of the other rich and democratic\ncountries has any of that shit. Here is Cyprus we have same life expectancy as\nin the U.S. (ok 3 months shorter) and the healthcare is paid for by a tax of\n2.65% of income (but it is charged on any and all income including those kinds\nof it exempt from any other taxes, except there is a cap of taxable income of\n180,000 EUR per person per year). On top of that there are purely symbolical\ncharges (say a doctor visit is usually 1 euro) probably only to keep track of\nthese visits. Seems to be enough. And no it's not Soviet-style healthcare, and\ndoctors are not poor - they all drive new BMWs, have good houses and stuff,\nand appear to be doing just as well as their American colleagues. What's going\non there in the U.S. people?!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.101"
    },
    {
        "id": 6617622,
        "hacker": "nawitus",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 53,
        "comment": "Google is claiming to have data.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 5422511,
        "hacker": "nawitus",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 53,
        "comment": ">Like, Finbarr is a dude. If there's a girl involved, maybe that's less\nterrible.\n\nThat's pretty damn sexist.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.306"
    },
    {
        "id": 8433477,
        "hacker": "nawitus",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 53,
        "comment": "They're [trying](http://www.automaattimetro.fi/en) to do that in Finland. The\ncost is around 170 million euros now, even though the projected cost was 100\nmillion.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7677815,
        "hacker": "dublinben",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 54,
        "comment": "How does Mozilla Persona satisfy your requirements?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7245509,
        "hacker": "dublinben",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 54,
        "comment": ">For additional help with password security, we recommend tools like 1Password\nand LastPass.\n\nIt's really too bad that they are recommending expensive, proprietary,\ncommercial apps for this when free, open source alternatives like KeePass\nexist. If users are unconvinced on the value of a password vault, charging\nmoney for it certainly isn't going to encourage adoption.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.055"
    },
    {
        "id": 10171236,
        "hacker": "dublinben",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 54,
        "comment": "I was unable to replicate his results on my Nexus 5 running AOSP. This\nbehavior has possibly changed in newer versions of Android.\n\nAlso, DPI can be trivially bypassed by running all traffic from your phone\nthrough a VPN. All traffic, tethered or not, will be indistinguishable to your\ncarrier.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 17291295,
        "hacker": "NamTaf",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 55,
        "comment": "Walking home every day. It's about an hour or so, vs my 20 mins on public\ntransport, but it's become a good time of meditative reflection and has\nprovided me with some fitness benefits. It's also time I'd otherwise spend\njust reading the internet or playing a videogame anyway.\n\nAlso, trying to meal prep a large number of the same dish to avoid buying\nlunches during the week and thus spending a large amount of money needlessly.\nI don't mind eating the same thing for several days, though to avoid that\nyou'd just need to prep 2 or 3 meals of smaller size. It doubles as an\neffective way to portion control too, since I can use containers of a specific\nsize. It also means that many nights of the week I get home from my walk and\njust toss one in the microwave or oven to reheat and don't end up eating any\nlater than normal.\n\nEdit: Both of the above have helped me maintain my post-glandular-fever weight\nloss of about 14kg, which has left me feeling significantly healthier than I\nwas previously. Occasionally I blow out with a weekend of debauchery involving\nway too much alcohol and unhealthy food, but the walking then chips that back\ndown and gives me motivation to limit said blowouts as I now have a\nquantifiable amount of effort that it equates to.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.086"
    },
    {
        "id": 19005620,
        "hacker": "NamTaf",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 55,
        "comment": "I'm so glad I have never encountered anything this bad in my life. This is\ntruly awful.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 14583989,
        "hacker": "NamTaf",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 55,
        "comment": "You greatly underestimate how utterly devoid of morals both of our major\nparties are, resulting in them being in the pocket of the coal miners and\nother big corps. They are almost militantly opposed to non-coal, non-LNG\ninvestment.\n\nThis is a government which earlier this year brought a lump of coal in to\nparliament as a prop to say that they were 'not afraid of coal' and to attack\nthe opposition for 'attacking the jobs of rural workers at the coal mines'.\nI'm not even joking:\nhttps://www.theguardian.com/global/video/2017/feb/09/scott-m...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.117"
    },
    {
        "id": 9491171,
        "hacker": "NamTaf",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 55,
        "comment": "\"Robust wireless capabilities enable remote drug library updates\" [1]\n\nWhat do they mean by 'robust'? You can rely on it to be there whenever you\nwant to hack someone to death?\n\n[1] http://www.hospira.com/en/products_and_services/infusion_pum...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.206"
    },
    {
        "id": 2874950,
        "hacker": "bdr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 56,
        "comment": "See also http://www.youtube.com/startupschool for the 2008 videos. Omnisio's\nversions had the speakers' slides, but those seem to be lost.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 107163,
        "hacker": "bdr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 56,
        "comment": "Seriously, what self-promotion?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.333"
    },
    {
        "id": 6254795,
        "hacker": "bdr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 56,
        "comment": "Beware scale-free arguments.\n\n> On the other hand, if Bitcoins continue to hold value over the long-term...\n\nIs long-term one month? One year? Ten years? Why?\n\n> There is no way a Bitcoin can be worth $122 over the long term...\n\nWhat about $12.20? $1.22? Why?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.031"
    },
    {
        "id": 8847856,
        "hacker": "samstokes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 57,
        "comment": "Looks like Canonical at least is doing that:\nhttp://www.ubuntu.com/certification/hardware/201411-16196/\n\n\"awarded the status of Certified Pre-Install for Ubuntu\"\n\n\"Certification notes: Hibernate is not working on this system\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 1779647,
        "hacker": "samstokes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 57,
        "comment": "Can anyone comment on how this compares to something like RequireJS?\n(http://requirejs.org/docs/why.html)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4588172,
        "hacker": "samstokes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 57,
        "comment": " _or use Google or Nokia maps by going to their websites_\n\n\"Please take a look at our competitors, and learn to associate their brands\nwith the subpar web versions of their mapping software.\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 2749349,
        "hacker": "teyc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 58,
        "comment": "Sorry, I should have mentioned IANAL and not even a US citizen. It'd probably\nbe seen as trying to circumvent laws wouldn't it? That'd be bad.\n\nOn the other hand, the major investors would lose out even more wouldn't they?\nDidn't they build any protection into their sale clauses?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.152"
    },
    {
        "id": 2574965,
        "hacker": "teyc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 58,
        "comment": "> wouldn't private methods solve that problem?\n\nNot if the third party developer intends to override it in his own subclasses.\n\nDocumentation may solve the issue, but this goes against the \"just works\"\nphilosophy.\n\nThe root of the problem is versioning. Your class was developed against\nversion 1 of the base class. You expect further changes in implementation of\nthe base class should not materially affect your running code.\n\nTo achieve this, one of the sacrifices is the all methods are not overridable\nby default (i.e. not virtual), but instead have to be explicitly declared\nvirtual AND the subclass has to explicitly state they wish to override the\nbase class.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.213"
    },
    {
        "id": 1637565,
        "hacker": "teyc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 58,
        "comment": "The author is clearly correct and yet he is wrong because he asked the wrong\nquestion.\n\nHow fast it runs is not as important as \"is it fast enough for the customer\"\nand \"will I be able to produce this at a reasonable price?\"\n\nEverything in engineering is a trade-off.\n\nA VM in a puny chip is the price one pays for a developer audience, to build a\nthriving ecosystem of apps so that consumers will want to buy the device.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.067"
    },
    {
        "id": 9215378,
        "hacker": "GFischer",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 59,
        "comment": "Be careful what you wish for... I know several PM types that can match you\ninsane hour per insane hour - some had skin in the game (part ownership),\nothers were just overzealous and I know at least one burned out.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.467"
    },
    {
        "id": 3746892,
        "hacker": "GFischer",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 59,
        "comment": "I did some very basic research for an essay on \"Healthcare in the Cloud\", and\nyes, the regulatory side sounded very painful.\n\nAmong the relevant regulations, the big ones are HIPAA and HITECH:\n\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Health_Insurance_Portability_an...\n\nhttp://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/administrative/enforcem...\n\nA big point that I remember was that a HIPAA breach was up to 1.5 million\ndollars in fines.\n\n\"A maximum penalty amount of $1.5 million for all violations of an identical\nprovision\"\n\nThis is one of the markets where BigCos can and should make a difference (and\nloads of cash in the process, but well, that's what regulations get).\n\nOn the flip side, HITECH introduced up to 20 billion dollars in incentives for\nadopting Electronic Health Records (EHRs), so maybe the millions in compliance\nare worth it for some startup :)\n\nI got some interesting data from here (\"Opportunities and Challenges of Cloud\nComputing to Improve Health Care Services\"):\n\nhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3222190/\n\nand some information by CompTIA’s Third Annual Healthcare IT Insights and\nOpportunities study.\n\nhttp://www.comptia.org/news/11-11-16/Healthcare_Practices_Em...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.088"
    },
    {
        "id": 3991412,
        "hacker": "GFischer",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 59,
        "comment": "\"Owning a home that's bigger than 500 square feet. (hint: that's not big.) \"\n\nThat's U.S. entitlement for you. 500 square feet is perfectly reasonable, I\nlive on about the same, and I rent it (and I'm 31 years old).\n\nA 500 square feet small apartment in Barcelona is about 200.000 euros right\nnow, and 80.000 here in Uruguay.\n\nI agree that it's not ideal for raising kids, but it's not something to whine\nabout.\n\nEdit: as others pointed out, most have a lot of work experience by 29 years\nold. I had 8 years' experience at the time and I expect people in the U.S. to\nhave even more since they graduate earlier and have summer jobs and all that.\n\nAlso, he says he can make 36.000 dollars/year?, well you can save a bit and\ntry your hand overseas. During hard times, people emigrated in the past. My\ngrandparents did, and endured hardships. In the U.S., you might have read\nabout pilgrims. I doubt they complained about not being able to afford a dog.\nAnd being a foreigner has a charm that will make you popular with girls (not\nto mention the U.S. passport if it comes to that).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.077"
    },
    {
        "id": 5668514,
        "hacker": "GFischer",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 59,
        "comment": "To be fair, they do post quite a lot of phone numbers, I don't know where they\ndug that page from:\n\nhttp://pressroom.yahoo.net/pr/ycorp/company-address.aspx\n\nYahoo! Inc. 701 First Avenue Sunnyvale, CA 94089 Tel: (408) 349-3300 Fax:\n(408) 349-3301\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.094"
    },
    {
        "id": 18532176,
        "hacker": "lwhi",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 60,
        "comment": "This company described the service as 'revenue sharing' ..\nhttp://www.callagenix.com/numbers/090x-premium-rate-numbers\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 2295908,
        "hacker": "lwhi",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 60,
        "comment": "I won't be commenting on techcrunch because of this change, and if I can't\ncomment I'll be less likely to visit regularly. I liked disqus .. and I'm\nannoyed that Facebook is invading this space.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.008"
    },
    {
        "id": 2285858,
        "hacker": "lwhi",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 60,
        "comment": "But personally, I think promotion of a new version - because it's compatible\nwith an accessory which fixes ergonomic issues - is a bit a wrong. The iPad 2\nis faster and slimmer .. and has some web-cams built in - but this constant\npursuit of 'progress' is a bit worrying. Especially when an iteration provides\nsuch (arguably) small gains.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.088"
    },
    {
        "id": 19909667,
        "hacker": "lwhi",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 60,
        "comment": "Who are you working for?\n\nFreelance doesn't necessarily mean you need to work for businesses without a\nbudget.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.312"
    },
    {
        "id": 6289442,
        "hacker": "dubcanada",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 61,
        "comment": "Care to expand on how Mac OS is a joke?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11336539,
        "hacker": "dubcanada",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 61,
        "comment": "I can assume lots of things raldi. I could also assume it's because of\nBrussels, but I would be wrong. I could assume it's because of a mudslid,\nstill wrong.\n\nRegardless of what you say it's not obvious... If it was there wouldn't be\nthis thread.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.333"
    },
    {
        "id": 5488469,
        "hacker": "dubcanada",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 61,
        "comment": "Strip is rolling out to other countries.\n\nTBH there is no reason for a company to not roll out so long as it is\nfinancially worth it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.042"
    },
    {
        "id": 12707452,
        "hacker": "MrBra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 62,
        "comment": "Dario Fo (Italian pronunciation: [ˈdaːrjo ˈfɔ]; 24 March 1926 – 13 October\n2016) was an Italian actor–playwright, comedian, singer, theatre director,\nstage designer, songwriter, painter and political campaigner of the Italian\nleft-wing, recipient of the 1997 Nobel Prize in Literature.\n\nGrammelot (or gromalot[1]) is a style of language used in satirical theatre, a\ngibberish with macaronic and onomatopoeic elements, used in association with\nmime and mimicry. The satirical use of such a format may date back to the 16th\ncentury commedia dell'arte; the group of cognate terms appears to belong to\nthe 20th century.\n\nWhile the historical origin of the term is unclear, it has been particularly\npopularized by the Nobel-winning Italian playwright Dario Fo with his 1969\nshow Mistero Buffo.\n\nhttps://youtu.be/8A4n9Ez9O8g?t=49s\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.053"
    },
    {
        "id": 16563342,
        "hacker": "MrBra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 62,
        "comment": "Judging from the comments, the majority just read the title, interpreted it\nwrong, and commented accordingly, so yes, I thought it was necessary to avoid\nmisinformation for other people coming here.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.208"
    },
    {
        "id": 6668895,
        "hacker": "MrBra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 62,
        "comment": "newbie insight at FP: basically: avoid (hidden) state and write everything\nlike mathematical functions (perhaps calling some other littler, math-like\nfunctions) and it's done?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.097"
    },
    {
        "id": 8095234,
        "hacker": "MrBra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 62,
        "comment": "So they did not actually attain below-absolute-0 temperatures?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10765794,
        "hacker": "MrBra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 62,
        "comment": "To those using it: did it happen to you at least once to find out that a\nspecific application (or game) you really needed did not work with Wine? What\nwas it?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 14843660,
        "hacker": "jimmaswell",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 63,
        "comment": "It would be nearly impossible for Apple to make an iPhone that doesn't sell\nwell. The point is that people still use aux cables.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.667"
    },
    {
        "id": 8143404,
        "hacker": "jimmaswell",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 63,
        "comment": "So that meams you can't get anything useful out of one antenna?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 8314211,
        "hacker": "jimmaswell",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 63,
        "comment": "Some people whose comfortable level of eating happens to be above what they\nburn in their average day would rather eat what they want instead of counting\ncalories, going hungry, and exercising all day.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 9919220,
        "hacker": "jimmaswell",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 63,
        "comment": "empty input gets empty output, solved\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 6681539,
        "hacker": "coob",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 64,
        "comment": "What I don't understand about all this is that Apple used to have availability\ntrackers of their own!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.750"
    },
    {
        "id": 4917042,
        "hacker": "coob",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 64,
        "comment": "…you think Apple are going to stop wanting to improve their maps?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6045074,
        "hacker": "coob",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 64,
        "comment": "What's nasty about Obj-C?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-1.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6411135,
        "hacker": "coob",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 64,
        "comment": "No, they keyboard and message box are clearly on a layer above the speech\nbubbles. There is nothing wrong with this behaviour.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 7012499,
        "hacker": "grumps",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 65,
        "comment": "Amen. My fiance is a social worker and has been working with homeless for the\npast 5 years.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.108"
    },
    {
        "id": 6833451,
        "hacker": "grumps",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 65,
        "comment": "I consistently find myself in similar situations. I've found some sites drop\ncharacters after a certain limit. Some sites only allowing numbers and\nletters.\n\nIt's truly maddening that these people are just awful. I wish there were a way\nto get them to change their rules.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.107"
    },
    {
        "id": 6792372,
        "hacker": "grumps",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 65,
        "comment": "My thoughts, exactly.\n\nI'd spread them out, over a few locations but one is a personal and the other\nis small one for a couple sites that we host.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.065"
    },
    {
        "id": 15161023,
        "hacker": "imaginenore",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 66,
        "comment": "It's Status-6, and it's not necessarily real.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanyon\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 15224383,
        "hacker": "imaginenore",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 66,
        "comment": "Seriously, go to archive.org and read what was actually posted on FPH. Pretty\nmuch none if it was \"ugh let's all point and laugh at the gross fatty\",\nbecause that's not funny at all. It was all about making fun of the \"culture\"\nand the dumb stuff the fat people bring on themselves.\n\nAnd so what if fat people know about it? Smokers also know smoking is bad, yet\nthe society does much worse to them - we post pics of sick people and warnings\non the product they buy. Do you think the smokers are oppressed and should be\nanother SJW-protected group? Or do you think we should post late stage\ndiabetes pics on cheese?\n\nAnd why shouldn't we make fun of groups of people, when it is funny? This\nthought policing has become ridiculous.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.111"
    },
    {
        "id": 10283767,
        "hacker": "imaginenore",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 66,
        "comment": "Wow, Bloomberg has fallen. Letting retarded feminists write tech articles.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.350"
    },
    {
        "id": 11571142,
        "hacker": "imaginenore",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 66,
        "comment": "So it's a mounted SSH drive with some local caching?\n\nLike SSHFS?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13732317,
        "hacker": "imaginenore",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 66,
        "comment": "Per core they might be useless, but that's a lot of cores. So per dollar it\nmight actually be good.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 10120049,
        "hacker": "hanniabu",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 67,
        "comment": "Both would be somehwat equally annoying in that they change the scope of the\nproject.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.800"
    },
    {
        "id": 17398035,
        "hacker": "hanniabu",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 67,
        "comment": "There are various projects developing solutions for hardware and sensor\nintegration\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18554314,
        "hacker": "hanniabu",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 67,
        "comment": "A regular DB can't ensure the same things blockchain can\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20447642,
        "hacker": "hanniabu",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 67,
        "comment": "I don't like these articles for the simple fact that climate change deniers\nuse it as \"evidence\" that climate change is fake\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 21576774,
        "hacker": "hanniabu",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 67,
        "comment": "I wasn't aware a version 4 was in the works. Any word on eta?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 10429086,
        "hacker": "hanniabu",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 67,
        "comment": "Pretty nifty....Is there a file size limit?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 2260394,
        "hacker": "seancron",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 68,
        "comment": "There's no bundled zip file that you can download like in other courses,\nhowever you can find the videos at\nhttp://ia700300.us.archive.org/15/items/MITRES18_006F10/\n\nQuick wget script to download _everything_ from that directoy:\n\n    \n    \n        wget -erobots=off -Pvideos --random-wait 1 -nH -nd -N -r -l 1 \"http://ia700300.us.archive.org/15/items/MITRES18_006F10/\"\n    \n\nAnd then just download the study materials from\nhttp://ocw.mit.edu/resources/res-18-006-calculus-revisited-f...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.104"
    },
    {
        "id": 2318212,
        "hacker": "seancron",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 68,
        "comment": "I hope you don't mind, but I just mirrored it on Github\n(https://github.com/seancron/kathack). You can use the following javascript to\nload it from the mirror.\n\n    \n    \n        javascript:var i,s,ss=['https://github.com/seancron/kathack/raw/master/kh.js','http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.5.1/jquery.min.js'];for(i=0;i!=ss.length;i++){s=document.createElement('script');s.src=ss[i];document.body.appendChild(s);}void(0);\n    \n\nP.S. If you do mind, just let me know and I'll take it down.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.078"
    },
    {
        "id": 1761612,
        "hacker": "seancron",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 68,
        "comment": "It loads for me, it just loads slowly.\n\nCached version: http://cache.historious.net/cached/569458/\n\nEdit: P.S. If you used the cached version, can you let me know how it worked\nfor you? I stumbled across historious and I'm testing to see how well it\nworks.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 4977900,
        "hacker": "PaulHoule",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 69,
        "comment": "The problem isn't if, it's \"else if\".\n\nIf-then-else ladders tend to evolve to be very difficult to understand,\nmaintain and debug\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.650"
    },
    {
        "id": 19522292,
        "hacker": "PaulHoule",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 69,
        "comment": "It's a mistake to consider this a feminist issue.\n\nMen with chronic pain will show up at a doctor and see the doctor scribble \"N.\nA. D.\" (No Apparent Distress) even though they are going to the doc because\nthey are distressed.\n\nPeople with back pain, neck pain, etc. lose many years of their life to\nlacking, ineffectual, or harmful (surgery and opioid) treatments. That's why\nmost men suffer through it and sometimes the first that most of the people who\n\"know them\" find out about it is after the suicide.\n\nThat is, women are not oppressed relative to men, they just expect more.\n(Maybe they should and men should too...)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.278"
    },
    {
        "id": 6739985,
        "hacker": "PaulHoule",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 69,
        "comment": "I think the difference is that Glassfish is a piece of garbage. Among the few\npeople who have heard of it it has a reputation of being the worst application\nserver you can possibly use.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 8132003,
        "hacker": "PaulHoule",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 69,
        "comment": "I think a general theory of it is that once in a while somebody comes up with\nsomething people really value and it expands the market and then me too\ncompetitors pile in and soon it looks like what you say.\n\nThe way to make it BIG is to find an untapped market and be the first to\nreally serve it.\n\nOne example I would look at is that health and fitness trackers are crowded\nbut a lot of suffering and lost productivity is caused by chronic pain of\nvarious sorts, there is no safe and effective drugs, no end of scams, but\nperhaps it is the kind of problem, like cystic fibrosis, that can be defeated\nwith intensivity. For instance if you see a physiotherapist he or she might do\nthe right things but only 1/10 as much as you need.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.178"
    },
    {
        "id": 10248521,
        "hacker": "PaulHoule",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 69,
        "comment": "It depends hugely on what you are trying to do.\n\nYou are definitely right to be thinking in terms of a team, because the myth\nof individual performance is damaging in so many ways.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.296"
    },
    {
        "id": 12239229,
        "hacker": "PaulHoule",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 69,
        "comment": "Keyboards of this general sort are cheap enough that I wouldn't mind trying a\nfew different ones to find one that works for me.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 13229806,
        "hacker": "PaulHoule",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 69,
        "comment": "I get tired when I talk to machines, it seems to take more mental and physical\neffort than talking to people. (I have to make whatever adjustments are\nrequired so the machine will understand me, multiplied by the number of times\nI have to repeat it.)\n\nAs for the fear of your fellow man, I think the total amount of danger you are\nexposed to through microphones through\n\n* high-school hackers\n\n* intelligence services of countries other than your own\n\n* identity thieves, bank robbers, etc.\n\n* disgruntled contractors of Amazon.com, National Security Agency, etc.\n\n* people who want to make a sex tape of you, or frame you for some crime, etc.\n\n* your spouse, parents, children, etc.\n\nis vastly greater than the treat of the intelligence agencies of your own\ncountry poses to you in most places.\n\nEcho normalizes \"always on\" behavior; something that looks a bit like a hockey\npuck can be stuffed under the bed, in either a tidy or messy A/V center and be\nignored. For that matter, people are used to seeing strange phones, laptops\nand other things plugged in around the home and office.\n\nThe threat you are up against looks like:\n\nhttps://vanderpot.com/Clinton_Cook_Paper.pdf\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.147"
    },
    {
        "id": 15391984,
        "hacker": "PaulHoule",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 69,
        "comment": "Definitely there is a \"me too\" effect where people pile on with what they\nthink is going to be popular.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 15361689,
        "hacker": "PaulHoule",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 69,
        "comment": "From what I hear people who sell virtual goods have awful problems with\nchargebacks.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-1.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15254615,
        "hacker": "ehnto",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 70,
        "comment": "It is entirely possible that the numbers don't work. From a business point of\nview if the only downside is that some art videos get incorrectly categorized\nthen correctly categorized after a manual review then reworking their business\nmodel doesn't make much sense.\n\nThis is bad PR for sure but I don't think the system is failing that badly.\nThe rate at which video is uploaded is truly stagerring, and that's assuming\nthat the successes of the automation deters many bad actors.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.112"
    },
    {
        "id": 18661934,
        "hacker": "ehnto",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 70,
        "comment": "I hope they do. I hope the global tech industry ostracises us and our tech\nindustry falls apart, and that the politicians wear every bit if it in some\nkind of political aftertmath, referendum, vote, protests, I don't care.\n\nMy worst fear isn't this causing damage, my worst fear is that the tech\ncommunity will be apathetic and impotent, like they have been all other\nerosions of privacy so far.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.204"
    },
    {
        "id": 19152437,
        "hacker": "ehnto",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 70,
        "comment": "It feels almost inevitable that all the major platforms will get compromised\nin some way, especially as they grow in features and thus attack surface. I\ncan only imagine the magnitude and persistence of attacks on these kinds of\nplatforms. Even if it's possible for them to be technically sound, all it\ntakes is a bad human to spoil all the hard engineering work.\n\nI wouldn't trust sensitive data on any of them, and with the way advertising\ntech and governments treat privacy, I'm not sure technology has a bright\nfuture in that regard. I would sooner write down a secret on a piece of paper\nand lock it in a drawer than keep them on a computer.\n\nIt's much more practical to have retractable, replaceable secrets, so that you\nhave agency over an inevitable leak of that secret. The way credit card\ncompanies handle breaches is a great example, they are very sympathetic to the\nfact that cards get stolen.\n\nI don't lead a particularly interesting life, so it's not really going to stop\nme from using computers, but on principal it's not very good that we can't\ntrust the devices in our pockets.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 10828254,
        "hacker": "EliRivers",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 71,
        "comment": "Alternatively, he's buying loads of stuff so he should get a discount compared\nto consumers like you who hardly buy anything.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.292"
    },
    {
        "id": 5150088,
        "hacker": "EliRivers",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 71,
        "comment": "I read that as San Francisco and wondered why a bunch of hipsters from the Bay\nwere being so retro :(\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.750"
    },
    {
        "id": 19397907,
        "hacker": "EliRivers",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 71,
        "comment": "Although the trend is now heading back towards that (in some places, including\nthe US and the UK); the wealth of your parents is a stronger indicator of\nfuture success than it was fifty years ago.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 17394507,
        "hacker": "EliRivers",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 71,
        "comment": "I was just reading about how horrible and exploitative Amazon is. How they\ndeliberately hire the weak, the afraid, the vulnerable. I can understand the\nmindset that designs an employment and recruitment system with the purpose of\nbeing able to thoroughly abuse and exploit employees. Doesn't make it any less\nhorrible. I no longer buy anything from Amazon. They're scum. I see well-paid\nemployees expressing their conscience and saying they won't work on\nsurveillance, or won't work on military projects. Where are the well-paid\nAmazon employees taking a stand against their own company's mistreatment of\nother employees? I wouldn't be surprised if we had some reading this very\nthread. Maybe they can tell us. I expect they just don't think about it. Take\nthe money, try not to think about it.\n\nFrom elsewhere:\n\n _Bezos defended Amazon in a fireside chat with Axel Springer CEO Mathias\nDöpfner on Tuesday evening, saying he was “very proud of our working\nconditions and I am very proud of our wages that we pay.”_\n\nHe's proud of it. He's proud of the return to the workhouse. He's proud of\nrolling back workplace protections. He's proud of paying a pittance. He's\nproud of it all. Or is he oblivious?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 11695148,
        "hacker": "EliRivers",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 71,
        "comment": "Oh God yes. Two topics analogies should never be used for when attempting to\nimpart understanding; QM and pointers.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11008330,
        "hacker": "EliRivers",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 71,
        "comment": "It's all in how one defines \"elegant\", I suppose. It relies on a handful of\nalmost side-effects and the lucky confluence of a series of unrelated language\nchoices; I see this and it reminds me of a dance, someone seeing the swinging\npieces of the code and making a minor touch in just the right place, taking\nadvantage of edge-effects that were never designed for exactly this but\ncombine to make something emergent so simple and easy. I see this as\nbreathtakingly elegant.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.282"
    },
    {
        "id": 17973387,
        "hacker": "Kalium",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 72,
        "comment": "Depends on how large the company's expected market is there. In most cases,\nthe sheer size and wealth of the EU makes this also a bad idea.\n\nOf course, there are hypothetical scenarios - though I can't think of a\nrealistic one right now - where the EU division is only profitable with the\neconomies of scale enabled by worldwide data-sharing. The assumption that\nanything and everything can be done profitable in a GDPR-compliant way is\nnaive at best, deluded at worst, but not universally wrong.\n\nThough between GDPR and the link tax proposal I can see news aggregators\nceasing to exist entirely within the EU. Which seems very likely to do a great\ndeal of harm to a lot of newspapers.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.074"
    },
    {
        "id": 12813390,
        "hacker": "Kalium",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 72,
        "comment": "Believe it or not, sometimes being over-the-top polite and accommodating to\npeople gets them to take a counter-point seriously. You just have to wrap it\nin a lot of stuff about how they're obviously right and you're clearly\ncompletely wrong. Once in a while catering to someone's need to be right lets\nyou slip an idea past it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.169"
    },
    {
        "id": 10839670,
        "hacker": "Kalium",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 72,
        "comment": "If you reduce \"outsized returns\" by 99.999999%, are they still \"outsized\"?\nWhat defines an outsized return? What's the proper amount of income inequality\nand what's a proper rate of return?\n\nIn a context like this, definitions are everything.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9382613,
        "hacker": "Kalium",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 72,
        "comment": "> Your assertion that women \"need special handholding and encouragement to\n> succeed at software development\" is insulting and distasteful.\n\nPlease, _please_ for the love of root do not use rhetoric like this. It's\nhollow posturing that offers nothing beyond scolding someone for the sin of\nnot agreeing with you.\n\nBeing insulting is not the same as being wrong. Being distasteful is not the\nsame as being wrong. Only one thing is the same as being wrong, and that's\nbeing wrong. I know this is an insulting, disrespectful, and distasteful thing\nto say... but being offended does not make you right.\n\nSo I have a question for you: why did you write the first line of your\ncomment?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.255"
    },
    {
        "id": 7891190,
        "hacker": "db48x",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 73,
        "comment": "If it becomes unprofitable (or less profitable than the alternatives) they'll\njust get out of the business altogether. I dunno if that's a bad thing or not,\nbut you can't say that everyone would go along with it, just everyone who was\nleft.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.289"
    },
    {
        "id": 17274291,
        "hacker": "db48x",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 73,
        "comment": "It's different enough from actual programming that your subconscious can keep\nworking on your real programming while you play. Be warned however, that your\nsubconscious can keep working on your factory while you work...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.033"
    },
    {
        "id": 13376185,
        "hacker": "db48x",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 73,
        "comment": "You would care about the pointers in that linked list if one of them had gone\nawry.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18746424,
        "hacker": "malvosenior",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 74,
        "comment": "The “vast majority” doesn’t include the historian giving the talk at Stanford\nI posted. I’m honestly surprised to see so much support for Jesus with no data\nbehind it on this site.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 19629854,
        "hacker": "malvosenior",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 74,
        "comment": "I see it more as by paying attention to the circus you’re rewarding bad\nbehavior (circus creation). Being immune to the histrionics makes it _harder_\nto be exploited.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 20267766,
        "hacker": "malvosenior",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 74,
        "comment": "Is that really a counterpoint though? My point is that they're classifying an\nentire state of people for political reasons and thus are just as bad as the\nexample the OP gave of the right assuming all people on the left want open\nborders.\n\nThey are both painting with overly broad brushes.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.019"
    },
    {
        "id": 20526639,
        "hacker": "malvosenior",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 74,
        "comment": "It's so annoying when platforms and product managers think they know better\nthan their users. People want to retweet and they will even if you remove this\nfeature (as they were before it existed). It basically comes off as Twitter\ndoesn't like the users they have or the behavior they want.\n\nIt's really hilarious that they use Gamergate as an example of why retweets\nare bad. That was a massive manifestation of the above concept. Journalists\nand platforms thought they knew better than gamers and users and they went to\nwar with each other. Gamergate as a grassroots, distributed movement was very\ninteresting and it's sadly not surprising that \"the powers that be\" want to\nreign back in control of the narrative.\n\nIt's also ironic that there's a gigantic \"Share\" and \"Tweet\" button at the top\nof this article. As if Buzzfeed isn't entirely guilty of creating clickbait\nand pumping it into social media to inflame and degrade conversation. The\ntitle of this post is literally: “We Handed a Loaded Weapon to 4-Year-Olds”.\nThat is not elevated conversation.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.027"
    },
    {
        "id": 15677061,
        "hacker": "malvosenior",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 74,
        "comment": "Ive noticed _a lot_ of random business people seem to be verified. It’s become\na meaningless (or negative) signal for me. Basically it says: I know someone\nat Twitter!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.458"
    },
    {
        "id": 13901373,
        "hacker": "driverdan",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 75,
        "comment": "A 3 day delay doesn't make much sense. The gluten would be digested and out of\nher system by then.\n\nHas she been to a doctor?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 8768885,
        "hacker": "driverdan",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 75,
        "comment": "That's only what they spend on housing, not total expenditures.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19070557,
        "hacker": "driverdan",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 75,
        "comment": "Unfortunately Buster no longer works. Google detects it now and makes you\nstart over.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 21011507,
        "hacker": "driverdan",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 75,
        "comment": "> I don't know what I saw but they were not weather balloons, satellites,\n> planes, planets, stars, or meteors.\n\nIf you don't know what they were then you can't rule out these other things.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 21097681,
        "hacker": "driverdan",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 75,
        "comment": "You're correct but I was talking about language selection in the context of\nweb development. There are, of course, specific domains that have language\nrequirements.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7775262,
        "hacker": "nknighthb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 76,
        "comment": "Like I said, your problem is with the result, not the method. You don't like\nthe decisions our politicians make. I don't blame you. That doesn't mean we're\nbeing dishonest.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.306"
    },
    {
        "id": 5841758,
        "hacker": "nknighthb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 76,
        "comment": "First of all, I've never even _seen_ the second of those two threads. Shocking\nas it may be to your ego, not everyone follows each and every one of your\nmyriad utterances on HN.\n\nBut neither thread is one of substance, only complaints and a vague \"we need a\ngeneral overlay network\". Not one word about what it should look like. How it\nshould work. Nothing.\n\nIf you want to argue about an idea, articulate one.\n\nEdit: I see in the second thread you actually did say something about a\ndirectory service, so I guess that is one word. But as far as I can tell, you\njust described yet-another-DNS-replacement. If I were generous, maybe I would\ncall it an Active Directory competitor.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.123"
    },
    {
        "id": 7117585,
        "hacker": "nknighthb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 76,
        "comment": "It's pretty easy to steal and use a credit card, doesn't mean a lot of\ncustomers do it. For low-value transactions, it's not worth spending much time\non. You save that for low-volume high-value transactions.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.084"
    },
    {
        "id": 7425670,
        "hacker": "nknighthb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 76,
        "comment": "I constantly want to touch my Pebble's screen. It's plenty big enough (and\ncould easily be bigger). The buttons are workable but not ideal. With, say,\n3-4 menu items on the screen, there's plenty of area for touching them, and it\nwould be a lot faster than hitting the up/down buttons a couple times followed\nby the select button.\n\nI don't get this \"can't see what you're doing\" thing at all. Do you not use\ntouchscreen phones? What's your finger doing in front of the thing you're\ngoing to touch _before_ you go to touch it?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.008"
    },
    {
        "id": 18826051,
        "hacker": "jdietrich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 77,
        "comment": " _> For one, you have a chance of actually finding quality native apps._\n\nReally? I can't recall ever finding a useful app through the app store. It's\nso littered with junk apps and deceptive copycats that discovery is a\nmiserable experience.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 20842911,
        "hacker": "jdietrich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 77,
        "comment": "Note to the comments: this is a one-off show piece, not something that anyone\nintends to use on the road. The VBx 2 coating is not fully waterproof, has\nextremely poor abrasion resistance and rapidly loses its light-absorbing\nproperties if exposed to contamination.\n\nhttps://www.surreynanosystems.com/super-black-coatings/vbx-c...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.350"
    },
    {
        "id": 16783126,
        "hacker": "jdietrich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 77,
        "comment": ">I could not agree with you more: Both my partner and I have been on SSRIs /\nSNRIs before for LIMITED DURATION. Probably over 10 times between the two of\nus.\n\nYou might want to consider maintenance therapy. The actual evidence for severe\ndiscontinuation effects is quite limited, but we have fairly strong evidence\nthat maintenance therapy significantly reduces the rate of relapse. It's\nnatural to want to avoid taking drugs indefinitely, but it's often a better\noption than a long-term cycle of depression, treatment, discontinuation and\nrelapse.\n\nI suspect that a substantial proportion of people mistakenly believe that\nthey're \"addicted\" to anti-depressants, when really they're just receiving an\neffective treatment for a chronic condition. They feel worse when they stop\ntaking the pills, because the pills are doing what they're supposed to do.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.147"
    },
    {
        "id": 13857228,
        "hacker": "jdietrich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 77,
        "comment": ">Difference between 1st, 2nd, and 10th comes down to talent and a bit of luck.\n\nIn a sufficiently competitive field, the difference between 1st and 10,000th\ncomes down to talent and luck.\n\nChess is incredibly instructive in this respect. Some players soar through the\nrankings in their teens with remarkably little effort; some battle on for\nyears with little to show for it. Some very promising players just run out of\ntalent and hit a hard ceiling on their rank, while others keep finding room\nfor improvement.\n\nI agree with the broad thrust of the linked article - there's a real cruelty\nto the 10,000 hour rule.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.032"
    },
    {
        "id": 13522843,
        "hacker": "jdietrich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 77,
        "comment": "There's a risk of exploitation by employers - hire workers for unskilled jobs,\n\"train\" them for a few months, then make them redundant when the subsidy runs\nout.\n\nHere in the UK, there used to be a lower minimum wage for trainees. It was\ncommon practice for employers to classify bartenders or farm labourers as\ntrainees for protracted periods, even though no real training was being\nprovided.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 12521631,
        "hacker": "jdietrich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 77,
        "comment": ">it's usually referred to as curation\n\nIt's also referred to as cronyism and discrimination. Allowing a decision-\nmaker to employ purely subjective criteria is wide open to abuse. Without\nobjective standards, that behaviour is impossible to challenge.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.134"
    },
    {
        "id": 9911208,
        "hacker": "jdietrich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 77,
        "comment": "That analysis is extremely flawed. We have no standardised start point for any\nof the grand cols and no accurate power data for most performances, meaning\nthere is an enormous amount of guesswork.\n\nTeam Sky have invested heavily in technology, which includes many significant\nimprovements to tyre rolling resistance and drivetrain losses - someone riding\nFroome's Pinarello would need about 30w less power to equal the performances\nof the 1990s.\n\nCourse profile is also highly significant. A rider who arrives at a major\nclimb with low lactate levels can remain above threshold for longer and\nsustain far higher power outputs. Without taking into account the parcours and\nprevious attacks on the day's stage, any comparison is meaningless. Again,\ntechnology plays a significant role - Sky have been criticized by many fans\nfor riding by the numbers, precisely pacing an effort for maximum efficiency\nrather than attacking and counterattacking. This kind of data-driven pacing\nsimply wasn't possible during the Festina era.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.117"
    },
    {
        "id": 5679969,
        "hacker": "jdietrich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 77,
        "comment": "All the critiques of HFT are a century old. When telegraphy was invented, it\nwas feared that the ticker-tape would create devastating waves of speculation,\nby speeding up the markets beyond human comprehension.\n\nWhen markets went over to computerised trading, it was argued that the human\nelement of open-outcry trading was vital in preserving a culture of honesty\nand integrity.\n\nCritiquing HFT is myopic, because it's based on a meaningless definition of\n\"high frequency\". HFTs are doing what traders have always done. There's a\nlegitimate argument against speculation, but it's pointless to single out\nspeculators that deal in the very short term. Singling out the newest\ntechnology is just a cheap shot, there's no fundamental difference between\ntrading on a millisecond horizon or a minute or hour horizon.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.096"
    },
    {
        "id": 4632271,
        "hacker": "bzbarsky",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 78,
        "comment": "> but I refuse to touch Javascript with a ten-foot pole.\n\nWhy? Honest question here: what are the problems that are making you unwilling\nto even try it? Is performance the main problem?\n\n> just think of it as opening up the \"standard native code\"\n\nAs long as the browser is running on a small set of target hardware\narchitectures. And everyone else gets locked out, right?\n\nIf PNaCl ever happens, that might change, but at the moment that's how NaCl\nworks: you tie your \"web page\" to a particular set of hardware architectures\nwhen you use it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.131"
    },
    {
        "id": 6152327,
        "hacker": "bzbarsky",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 78,
        "comment": "What do you use on Chrome?\n\nWhat I see is that the page is using self-throttling to a ridiculous extent in\nFirefox, but not Chrome, with way too few letters changed between paints. Are\nyou doing a single letter from each async callback or something?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.202"
    },
    {
        "id": 13146815,
        "hacker": "bzbarsky",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 78,
        "comment": "Say the advice is \"look behind the couch in the living room\" and the object is\nlater found on the kitchen counter. And the rigging consists of the\nexperimenter asking the kid to get something unrelated from the kitchen, for\nexample.\n\nBut yes, it's hard to determine whether this is how the experiment worked from\nthe article. Unfortunately the actual paper at\nhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022096516... is paywalled\nin the usual way.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.240"
    },
    {
        "id": 8750804,
        "hacker": "bzbarsky",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 78,
        "comment": "> that they are shipping shadow dom in conjunction with Mozilla\n\nWith my Mozilla developer hat on, that happens not to be the case. Which you\nwould have known had you either read the entire linked-to thread, or even just\nread the mail that was linked to, which points that out explicitly in the\n\"notwithstanding your apparently inaccurate statement about Mozilla\" bit.\n\n> That was literally the next statement where you cut your quote.\n\nIt was also a misrepresentation of what's actually going on. Quite common out\nof Google these days, unfortunately; we've had to call them on it publicly a\nnumber of times. Not that this is stopping them from continuing to claim that\nothers are OK with something they're doing when that happens to not be true.\n\n> but all the talking and consensus building was done\n\nThe only thing discussed at the CSS working group f2f was the cat and hat\ncombinators, not the entire shadow DOM spec. And even for those, serious\nissues were raised later by people who were not present at the f2f.\n\nFor shadow DOM as a whole, there is no consensus at all. Mozilla is not really\non board with the spec in its current form (and we've said so repeatedly and\npublicly, though we do at least have a plan for how to get the spec to\nsomething that we'll be OK shipping... which won't match what Google is\nshipping). Apple is very definitely not on board at all with the spec in its\ncurrent form, and Google is not even trying to get them on board. Microsoft\nhas basically said nothing apart from having concerns.\n\nIn addition to that, the spec doesn't match Google's implementation at all, in\nall sorts of ways that are obvious if you actually stop to read what the spec\nsays.\n\nBasically, Google implemented and shipped whatever they felt like and made a\nsort of attempt at specifying something or other which totally doesn't match\nwhat they shipped. And other UA vendors at best (Mozilla) plan to ship\nsomething somewhat different from what Google has shipped and at worst (Apple)\nthink the whole thing needs to go back to the drawing board because it's just\nbroken by design.\n\nIf you don't think that's unilaterally shipping before standardization, I'm\nnot sure what you think it is, exactly.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 17724863,
        "hacker": "psychometry",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 79,
        "comment": "If 1-indexing seems strange, you're probably not doing mathematical or\nstatistical computing, so it's probably not the language for you.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 17444132,
        "hacker": "psychometry",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 79,
        "comment": "This is a Nature Briefing, not an article/letter. Nature is still a serious\nscientific publication, on par with Science and NEJM.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.333"
    },
    {
        "id": 8641876,
        "hacker": "psychometry",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 79,
        "comment": "You realize that OTA HDTV is...free, right? Explain to me how any content\nprovider lost a single dollar because of Aereo's existence.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.107"
    },
    {
        "id": 13135716,
        "hacker": "sliken",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 80,
        "comment": "They killed the lifetime guarantee on tools.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 21079986,
        "hacker": "sliken",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 80,
        "comment": "At 6000 km away the gravity at the nearest surface of earth is zero.\n\n1 minute (at 50km/sec) later it would be 3000 km the acceleration 4.5G or so.\n\n1.5 minutes later it would 1500 km away the acceleration would be 17G or\nhigher.\n\n2 minutes later it would be on the surface, and everything ripped up\n(including buildings, soil, bedrock, crust, and the magma below would go from\nbeing accelerated up at incredible velocities to an even more intense\nacceleration down.\n\nOver that 2 minutes the black hole is going to chew the hell out of the earth\nfor 1000s of km in all directions and that's just the start of the fun.\n\nAs it hits the surface everything within 1000km will be experiencing 40G. The\npressure waves will go from negative (as the black hole pulls the atmosphere\naway from the earth) to a HUGE over pressure as magma, bedrock, and water get\nslammed back down into the earth at 40G. Said over pressure wave of intense\nheat and pressure will expand outward from the point of impact and create\nproblems world wide.\n\nWorse on the opposite side it will just take a large chunk with it\n(approximately the volume of which the black hole has significantly more than\n1G of gravity) which could easily take a continent with it, or say most of the\npacific ocean.\n\nI could see ocean levels and air pressure lowering significantly. After all\nwhy would the air stick around a 1G planet instead of a more than 1G black\nhole?\n\nThe area from which the air is removed is likely to be somewhere around 12,000\nkm wide (the area of which the black hole applies more than 1G).\n\nSo I'm not sure I believe the \"barely enough time to move\" thing when for\nminutes the accelerations will be crazy.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.071"
    },
    {
        "id": 16410846,
        "hacker": "sliken",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 80,
        "comment": "Heh, not particularly accurate. The moon won't “eventually escape entirely”.\nIt's orbit will keep increasing till the solar day = lunar month. At which\npoints the tides stop and there's no more energy to increase the moon's orbit.\n\nThe fun part is because vacuum is not perfect and the incredibly small effects\nof gravitational waves the orbit will start decreasing.... till it hits the\nRoche limit and becomes a ring!\n\nAll that ignores the sun expanding and consuming the inner planets.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.121"
    },
    {
        "id": 18535636,
        "hacker": "gowld",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 81,
        "comment": "Vendor lock-in and network effects.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20416024,
        "hacker": "gowld",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 81,
        "comment": "Pretending that junior engineers is the problem, is the problem.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 21359366,
        "hacker": "gowld",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 81,
        "comment": "> Ray Bull [...] told The Intercept that the iBorderCtrl project was “not\n> credible”\n\nWhat an aptonym!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 1850350,
        "hacker": "kev009",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 82,
        "comment": "The idea is to keep the information open, free, and interchangeable as\ninformation is what these sites add. We've had public VCS repos and web\ninterfaces for ages.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 16797596,
        "hacker": "kev009",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 82,
        "comment": "I think this is some kind of psychological projection/rationalization because\nthe statement \"Having been well and truly spoiled by illumos threading (and\nespecially illumos kernel threads)\" is actually quite laughable.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.020"
    },
    {
        "id": 8637735,
        "hacker": "kev009",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 82,
        "comment": "This article goes from mediocre to bad when it starts advocating security by\nobscurity.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.600"
    },
    {
        "id": 16615799,
        "hacker": "kev009",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 82,
        "comment": "s/shaping/pacing/, we're trying to smooth out the bursty nature of sending\nfrom high speed links and TSO so a flow is less likely to incur large\ncontiguous buffer drops and tail drops along its path rather than limit the\nflow's throughput. I have a large fleet of intel NICs on the back half of\ntheir life cycle. NIC pacers sound good in theory and I'd like to eventually\npartial offload but they have limitations in terms of flows and number of\npacing rates so will still require a software fallback. On a timerwheel, the\nsystem overhead for no offload and a partial offload is not nearly economical\nas theoretical full offload. And contrary to some misinformation from one of\nthe varnish devs in this thread, taking an SWI/context switch/scheduler\noverhead (these basic concepts will probably get called \"babble\" by the dude)\ncomprise much of the overhead.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.115"
    },
    {
        "id": 19694624,
        "hacker": "lvh",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 83,
        "comment": "Whoops; you're right of course, but same idea with fewer primitives -- either\nway, obscure the output of the polynomial MAC with the output of a cipher, so\nyou get the fast MAC that you can reuse multiple times.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.121"
    },
    {
        "id": 4401325,
        "hacker": "lvh",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 83,
        "comment": "This made my brain hurt. Terrible article.\n\n> Lots of rubyists defends this aproach with arguments that GIL makes single\n> threaded apps faster and makes writing of the multi-threaded apps easier.\n> You know what… that’s total bullshit.\n\nNo, it's not. It's a fact.\n\nArticle also confounds parallelism and concurrency all over the place.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.357"
    },
    {
        "id": 13638348,
        "hacker": "lvh",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 83,
        "comment": "TweetNaCl was created approximately simultaneously (2013) with libsodium.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 16702575,
        "hacker": "lvh",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 83,
        "comment": "It depends how many things you want to use concurrently. At Latacora some of\nus use Qubes to guarantee client separation, so lots of domains open and all\nof them running Slack, so, yeah, my machine has 32GB and that’s not a massive\nluxury.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 19384078,
        "hacker": "lvh",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 83,
        "comment": "Where does the post tell you to do that? If anything it tells you a) spend a\nlot of time paying attention to what sounds like what you might call \"the\ngeneral security implications of containers\" and b) it also tells you that\nsystems like K8s mean that you may not need to run said container to your prod\ndatabase.\n\nSaying that one of the senior engineers at Gravitational \"is unaware of the\ngeneral security implications of containers\" is a pretty bold claim.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.062"
    },
    {
        "id": 15931478,
        "hacker": "donatj",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 84,
        "comment": "Recycling is useless because the process takes more energy than mining new\nexcept for a few select materials. It’s a feel good exercise in wastefulness.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.127"
    },
    {
        "id": 11480186,
        "hacker": "donatj",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 84,
        "comment": "> Though Defendants conducted these searches against the will of Ms. Doe and\n> without her consent, the Medical Center billed Ms. Doe more than $5,000.00\n> for its “services.”\n\nGod, that is the worst thing I have ever read. Ever. They horrendously\nviolated her and then had the audacity to charge her for it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 13005706,
        "hacker": "donatj",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 84,
        "comment": "What percent of Oracle acquisitions don't end in either purposefully shutdown\nor shutdown due to management failure?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.221"
    },
    {
        "id": 8933345,
        "hacker": "GFK_of_xmaspast",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 85,
        "comment": "Has he condemned his supporters' treatment of Shanley and other critics? If\nthey're doing it in his name, his silence implies approval.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 10018560,
        "hacker": "GFK_of_xmaspast",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 85,
        "comment": "The answer is: \"Who cares about the average citizen?\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 10622763,
        "hacker": "GFK_of_xmaspast",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 85,
        "comment": "What about the systematic destruction and de-industrialization of places like\nIndia by the British tho?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10939828,
        "hacker": "GFK_of_xmaspast",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 85,
        "comment": "> Virtually no one was opposed to marriage equality.\n\nOn the other hand, observed reality.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 12239606,
        "hacker": "GFK_of_xmaspast",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 85,
        "comment": "Have you considered \"taking classes\"?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11234994,
        "hacker": "qq66",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 86,
        "comment": "also the .50 in a really small font, making it $5.50 not $5.00.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 1792344,
        "hacker": "qq66",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 86,
        "comment": "Using immigrants as a proxy for anything is very suspect since emigrants to\nthe US are a self-selected subset of a country's population. Compare the\naverage intelligence, ambition, and work ethic of an Indian-American\nimmigrant, that immigrant's American-born child, and the average resident of\nIndia.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.033"
    },
    {
        "id": 7094366,
        "hacker": "qq66",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 86,
        "comment": "Seems like the type of problem that will be solved in order to sell products\nto those too lazy to plug in their phones, but in doing so open up entirely\nnew possibilities in medical devices, remote sensing, and other areas.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.056"
    },
    {
        "id": 2102555,
        "hacker": "qq66",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 86,
        "comment": "You could give pre-tests to people and organize them into \"classes\" which they\nwill stay with for four years... along with ways of sharing personal info with\neach other (Facebook friends perhaps)... with a once-a-year in-person meetup\nweekend.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.062"
    },
    {
        "id": 7352520,
        "hacker": "qq66",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 86,
        "comment": "Psychology isn't really comparable to computer science since computer science\nis the study of a manmade system, making it more like mathematics. Computer\nscience is not a traditional \"science\" studying the mechanisms of an unknown\nphenomenon, so concepts like \"experimental design\" aren't easily mappable.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.189"
    },
    {
        "id": 15024985,
        "hacker": "qq66",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 86,
        "comment": "I would like to see the organizers of these scams executed, and given the\nnature of their crimes and their victims, I do not personally believe that\nthis would be cruel or unusual punishment. I know that the Supreme Court would\ndisagree with me.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.267"
    },
    {
        "id": 14903022,
        "hacker": "neves",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 87,
        "comment": "Please, would you explain what is \"never again\" for a non american?\n\nIs it about this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_Defense_League ?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14791917,
        "hacker": "neves",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 87,
        "comment": "As a Brazilian that grew up on the 90's watching this situation unwind, I\nreally hate the IMFs recessive policies that impoverished my country. Their\nausterity rules always increased our recessions. It always looked to me as\njust a instrument to maintain poor countries poor.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.533"
    },
    {
        "id": 13903433,
        "hacker": "neves",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 87,
        "comment": "This USA student loan scheme is one of the most brilliant machines of social\ncontrol ever devised.\n\nPeople get of college already owing a lot money, now they have to work for\nshit, and put up with their asshole bosses do. They can't have the option to\nspend couple of months searching for jobs or they will have to default their\ndebt and mess all their future life.\n\nNothing like a well behaved society where the workers can't complain.\n\nBrilliant!!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.294"
    },
    {
        "id": 580787,
        "hacker": "rthomas6",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 88,
        "comment": "They use the strange names that they do because a function declared in C is\ndeclared everywhere in the whole program. They use strange names to try to\nstay out of your way; i. e. it would be really bad if two functions had the\nsame name.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.120"
    },
    {
        "id": 20104537,
        "hacker": "rthomas6",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 88,
        "comment": "It's a negative externality. Price it into the cost, use that extra money to\noffset pollution/whatever, and the problem is solved. It's simple to say but\nnobody wants to do it because it hurts.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 5106044,
        "hacker": "rthomas6",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 88,
        "comment": "Inflation is irrelevant over the long term. The real cost of goods after\nadjusting for inflation has gone down for the past few hundred years. It's of\ncourse a problem, but not because it will increase scarcity.\n\nAs you mentioned, the real problem is the aging and obsolete workers in the\nshort term.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.094"
    },
    {
        "id": 16040075,
        "hacker": "boulos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 89,
        "comment": "There's Embree, but I don't know (or think) they would have thought to make\nPython bindings. I'm not sure how fast Mitsuba is, but since Wenzel wrote his\nown C++ to Python wrapper I'd wager that there are Python bindings for that.\n\nWhat's your use case?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.183"
    },
    {
        "id": 12433793,
        "hacker": "boulos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 89,
        "comment": "What's the source for your data? While searching, I found this [0] which seems\nto have some detail by zipcode. (I had thought \"Maybe he means in restaurants\nin the Mission?\", suggestion: nope).\n\n[0] http://www.sfhip.org/index.php?module=DemographicData&type=u...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12608147,
        "hacker": "boulos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 89,
        "comment": "Sorry we didn't make this explicit, but we'll be three zones for GCE in Oregon\n\"soon\" (i.e., us-west1-c will be online).\n\nDisclosure: I work on Google Cloud.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 9959736,
        "hacker": "boulos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 89,
        "comment": "It only just came out of preview, so I'd expect someone independent to test it\nout in the coming weeks. Maybe / hopefully one of the Percona folks?\n\nEdit: typo (out _of_ preview)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 5288717,
        "hacker": "sixothree",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 90,
        "comment": "My boss and I both had Early 2008 MBP 15\". He spilled a large cup of coffee\ninto the keyboard. He turned the machine upside down and it was pouring out.\n\nI sprung into action and opened that machine up and started dousing all of the\nparts with distilled water then drying them. I didn't need any special tools\nor even a service manual.\n\nThat generation MBP had the most beautiful design inside and out that I have\never seen. It was the pinnacle of geekdom beauty and it only lasted a year or\ntwo.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.246"
    },
    {
        "id": 8389880,
        "hacker": "sixothree",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 90,
        "comment": "Hmm sounds to me like they are trying to convince people to use their phones\nfor illegal doings.\n\nAlso, all of the comments in this thread (not this one specifically) make me\nwish HN threads root comments defaulted to collapsed so people might avoid\nduplicate root comments. Maybe...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 21312534,
        "hacker": "sixothree",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 90,
        "comment": "I am guessing #1 is mot wanting your internet provider (eg. AT&T) knowing what\nyou are doing, then Netflix, Torrents, getting better deals on tickets and\nsuch, maybe activities of questionable legality?\n\nPersonally, I don't like the idea of my mobile provider profiting off knowing\nwhich applications I am using and what sites I visit.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11392064,
        "hacker": "sixothree",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 90,
        "comment": "Thinkpad T460s. I have the T450s and like it plenty. It's definitely up there\nwith macbook build quality.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12825509,
        "hacker": "sixothree",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 90,
        "comment": "I would like it to do something other than cut the power to my VMs when the\nhost system shuts down or reboots.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.140"
    },
    {
        "id": 19962558,
        "hacker": "akhilcacharya",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 91,
        "comment": "No, NYC, Boston, Seattle and Chicago.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18438035,
        "hacker": "akhilcacharya",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 91,
        "comment": "For some weird reason (in my experience) Amazon employees all seem to want to\nmove to NYC. Like, constantly. Go on Blind and they'll talk about it all day\nwith dubious reasoning.\n\nI don't get it myself (I had a few NYC offers but chose Amazon in Boston\ninstead), but NYC has become \"the place\" elite for software-focused undergrads\nthese days. Everyone wants to get into FB/Instagram NY or Google NYC.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.180"
    },
    {
        "id": 15646625,
        "hacker": "akhilcacharya",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 91,
        "comment": "Cracking down on Indian outsourcers is one thing, but if this is true\n\n> The skeptical eye the government is taking to applications has extended to\n> all types of employers, according to immigration lawyers. Many are\n> rethinking their own use of H-1B as a result.\n\nThis is absolutely disastrous. I personally know families on H1B from well-\nknown American companies are afraid to leave the country because of this.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.056"
    },
    {
        "id": 19570557,
        "hacker": "jpatokal",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 92,
        "comment": "I'm not saying I'd _want_ to try to a catch Komodo dragon, but they're still\nless half the size of a saltwater crocodile, which can go over 6m! Here's one\ntackling a wildebeest:\n\nhttps://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/worlds-deadliest/...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.188"
    },
    {
        "id": 18513771,
        "hacker": "jpatokal",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 92,
        "comment": "Depends on your credit card: it's not uncommon for them to also slap you with\nforeign transaction fees of 3% or higher.\n\nIn general, the hierarchy of fees is no-fee CC < regular CC < ATM withdrawal <\nexchange cash at destination < exchange cash somewhere else.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.045"
    },
    {
        "id": 14759199,
        "hacker": "jpatokal",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 92,
        "comment": "My view is that SegWit is a bandaid, not a cure: while it would give Bitcoin\nsome breathing room, it doesn't fix the underlying constraints and is not\nalone going to solve scaling, hence \"muddle through\".\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11124748,
        "hacker": "Freak_NL",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 93,
        "comment": "No phone required, at all. It would not be a very useful standard if a\nsmartphone was a requirement.\n\nHave a look at this short overview:\n\nhttps://fidoalliance.org/specifications/overview/\n\nUAF is authentication by means of a local device with some biometric\nauthentication factor. U2F uses a separate hardware token that can be used via\nUSB, NFC, or Bluetooth LE — so basically, any modern computing device.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.118"
    },
    {
        "id": 21058889,
        "hacker": "Freak_NL",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 93,
        "comment": "I wish it was restricted to just Twitter or the usual suspects. Have you\nlooked at the grey comments in this thread?\n\nThe amount of defeatism, unfounded scepticism, denial, and just pure and nasty\nad hominem attacks is sickening.\n\nThe one potentially positive thing to note may be that denial and anger often\ncome before acceptance. Eventually.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.351"
    },
    {
        "id": 19309536,
        "hacker": "Freak_NL",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 93,
        "comment": "Isn't document.visibilityState a read-only property?\n\nhttps://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Document/vi...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14652231,
        "hacker": "Freak_NL",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 93,
        "comment": "There may be several practical reasons for doing that though. CRT screens\ncreate weird effects on camera, and maintaining a bunch of functional ageing\nhardware is going to get a lot harder as time goes on for complex electronics\nthat have been superseded by modern technology.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.140"
    },
    {
        "id": 13296284,
        "hacker": "Freak_NL",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 93,
        "comment": "Since a couple of years red plastic cups are now being sold in stores in The\nNetherlands alongside the more common plain white cups. Not because the Solo\ncompany started selling them here, but (ostensibly) because a red cup carries\nthe connotation of college students partying and alcoholic drinks, and\napparently that image sells cups.\n\nThe colour of these cups is a cultural import from the US; if your frame of\nreference is the cup's portrayal in media, then the red Solo cup appears to be\nexclusively used for partying and drinking with abandon (e.g., consider the\nimage of college students playing beer pong), so you get red cups if you're a\nteenager organizing a party.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.010"
    },
    {
        "id": 12038146,
        "hacker": "clifanatic",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 94,
        "comment": "You should read some of the stuff Eric Meyer (the CSS guy) wrote about\nwatching his daughter succumb to cancer:\nhttp://meyerweb.com/eric/thoughts/category/personal/rebecca/ THAT will change\nthe way you look at the world.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12507274,
        "hacker": "clifanatic",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 94,
        "comment": "> they look (at least from job posting) for ridiculous years of experience\n\nYeah, they want 20 years of experience. But they still won't hire anybody over\n25. Start young, kids!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.169"
    },
    {
        "id": 12709751,
        "hacker": "clifanatic",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 94,
        "comment": "The first comic I think is supposed to make me feel sorry for the poor saps\nwho have to test against a dozen different Android phones but I couldn't help\nbut think what a luxury it would be to work for an employer who actually\nprovided physical hardware to test against. I've been developing software for\n25 years and have yet to encounter this.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.057"
    },
    {
        "id": 16570054,
        "hacker": "bjoli",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 95,
        "comment": "I tried guile-emacs last year, and back then it even ran org.\n\nI doubt it will happen though, since more trivial and much less intrusive\nchanges to Emacs get bikeshedded into oblivion.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 17424160,
        "hacker": "bjoli",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 95,
        "comment": "I can understand that, but it is a shame they didn't chose to do so for self-\nrecursing functions. That would at least tell you the stack trace up until\nthat point.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 18784882,
        "hacker": "bjoli",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 95,
        "comment": "Ouch... That seems painful and really like someone made a wrong decision 20\nyears ago. Back then scheme was a pretty inane choice compared to CL. That is\nnot as much the case today, regardless of what the CLers say :)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.007"
    },
    {
        "id": 2343457,
        "hacker": "nikcub",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 96,
        "comment": "the attacker left their IP address in the dump, and their LAN interface\naddress\n\nEdit: it's whoever dumped this as opposed to an attacker\n\nI don't think tumblr have acted on this yet. The other exposed pages have S3\nAPI secret keys, facebook api secret keys, the username and passwords for\nvimeo, clickatell (whatever that is), twitter oauth secret key, etc. they are\ngoing to have to revoke and re-setup each of these.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.221"
    },
    {
        "id": 2394603,
        "hacker": "nikcub",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 96,
        "comment": "then HN needs to implement URL normalization and equivalence from RFC3986.\nThese are fresh in my mind because I extended urllib in Python to support them\nlast week.\n\nIt isn't an easy problem to solve, working out if two URLs are equivalent, but\nthe RFC goes some way to solving it which picks up easy things like adding a\n#.\n\nsee: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#section-6\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.292"
    },
    {
        "id": 4670020,
        "hacker": "nikcub",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 96,
        "comment": "Flash performance is terrible on my $3700 12-month old Macbook Pro\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.450"
    },
    {
        "id": 15291886,
        "hacker": "nikcub",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 96,
        "comment": "Mining power was shown to be overrated by the failure of multiple miner driven\nor supported proposals and the success of the user-activated Segwit soft fork.\n\nThe idea of the UASF was that miners would be economically incentivized to\nfollow user nodes signaling and then enforcing new rules - and that is exactly\nwhat happen.\n\nIt is also not out of the question to alter how blocks are mined in Bitcoin -\nEthereum is doing that in an upcoming hard fork[0].\n\nWith Bitcoin it would be possible to not only introduce a new PoW with a soft-\nfork, or introduce multiple proof of work methods so that each has a\ndifficulty target and no one PoW has a geographic, technological or regulatory\nadvantage allowing it to achieve more than 100 / number_of_proofs_of_work%\nhashrate\n\n[0] Ethereum is transition from proof-of-work to a combined proof-of-\nwork/proof-of-stake with the Casper project\nhttps://github.com/ethereum/research/wiki/Casper-Version-1-I...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.087"
    },
    {
        "id": 267347,
        "hacker": "jedc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 97,
        "comment": "True. And those top finance jobs still go to a small minority of people.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 302511,
        "hacker": "jedc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 97,
        "comment": "Previously they probably didn't want to promise something that might not work.\nWith all the recent high-profile problems they probably feel they finally have\nto.\n\nI agree, about time!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.056"
    },
    {
        "id": 457326,
        "hacker": "jedc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 97,
        "comment": "A truly scary proposition is entering a username and coming up with\nnames/addresses/etc.\n\nThat would scare the crap out of quite a few people, I would guess.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 1576687,
        "hacker": "jedc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 97,
        "comment": "I get the sense that the launch strategy wasn't flawed as much as no one\nreally understood the real use cases. Without that, no one knew how to\nproperly communicate benefits and target the right users. (I would also guess\nthat they never thought they'd get the level of publicity they got.)\n\nAnd by the time Wave had had enough testing, they had lost all the early\nmomentum. At some point you've got to choose where you put your effort!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.064"
    },
    {
        "id": 12599945,
        "hacker": "sctb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 98,
        "comment": "> _... since you are missing my fucking point ..._\n\nYou can't do this here. Please comment civilly and substantively or not at\nall. We detached this flagged comment from\nhttps://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=12598347.\n\nhttps://news.ycombinator.com/newsguidelines.html\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 13141534,
        "hacker": "sctb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 98,
        "comment": "Please comment civilly and substantively on HN or not at all.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13146514,
        "hacker": "sctb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 98,
        "comment": "Related discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=13083180\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13784321,
        "hacker": "sctb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 98,
        "comment": "We ban accounts created just to post like this.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15105670,
        "hacker": "sctb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 98,
        "comment": "Thanks, we updated the link from https://www.gizmodo.com/2017/08/facebook-\nfigured-out-my-fami... but kept the .com site.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 15132056,
        "hacker": "sctb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 98,
        "comment": "Previous discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15121915\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 15698136,
        "hacker": "sctb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 98,
        "comment": "Please don't do this.\n\n> _Eschew flamebait. Don 't introduce flamewar topics unless you have\n> something genuinely new to say. Avoid unrelated controversies and generic\n> tangents._\n\nhttps://news.ycombinator.com/newsguidelines.html\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.068"
    },
    {
        "id": 17376283,
        "hacker": "sctb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 98,
        "comment": "> _Please don 't impute astroturfing or shillage. That degrades discussion and\n> is usually mistaken. If you're worried about it, email us and we'll look at\n> the data._\n\nhttps://news.ycombinator.com/newsguidelines.html\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 19080791,
        "hacker": "sctb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 98,
        "comment": "There is little that can be gleaned from voting, especially early on. It's\njust plain noisy and you don't know what someone is objecting to.\n\n> _Please don 't comment about the voting on comments. It never does any good,\n> and it makes boring reading._\n\nhttps://news.ycombinator.com/newsguidelines.html\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 14592775,
        "hacker": "ngrilly",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 99,
        "comment": "Thanks.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 16702156,
        "hacker": "ngrilly",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 99,
        "comment": "I didn't know about .NET permitting interior pointers. Thanks.\n\nI think you're right about HotSpot GC not using read barriers. I was mixing it\nup with the Azul GC, which uses read barriers.\n\n> If you have concurrent mark-and-sweep and stop the world only during\n> compaction phases, read barriers are unnecessary.\n\nDo you know if it's possible to bound the pause caused by the compaction phase\nto some ceiling, like 2 ms for example? I'm asking because it's a goal of Go'\nGC to limit GC pauses.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.017"
    },
    {
        "id": 17552976,
        "hacker": "ngrilly",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 99,
        "comment": "\"Idiotic culture\" is a bit harsh.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.433"
    },
    {
        "id": 12892324,
        "hacker": "mhurron",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 100,
        "comment": "That's only if a 40 hour week is the optimum. Since no one is really working 8\nhours, 5 days a week, that's doubtful.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 11074505,
        "hacker": "mhurron",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 100,
        "comment": "Plenty of time for riders to get attached.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10234873,
        "hacker": "mhurron",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 100,
        "comment": "> But I always felt bad for outright lying.\n\nYou are always fully booked, even if your doing very little, because this\nproject is not enough to make you move your current schedule around to\naccommodate it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.236"
    },
    {
        "id": 8500673,
        "hacker": "mhurron",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 100,
        "comment": "> This is half-baked\n\nSeems it works about as well as the rest of Apple Maps.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 5299575,
        "hacker": "mhurron",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 100,
        "comment": "Profanity is hardly the only thing. HN, or a subset of it's users, basically\nexpect everyone to act like humourless, passionless robots.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.146"
    },
    {
        "id": 20766015,
        "hacker": "hvidgaard",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 101,
        "comment": "For archival purposes, it makes no sense to store anything less than lossless.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 19989177,
        "hacker": "hvidgaard",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 101,
        "comment": "You cannot carry it in the public, and you are generally not allowed to use\ndeadly force. Hand guns are not allowed for private ownership and there are\nabout 20-30 gun related deaths yearly in the UK. In US numbers that would be\nequivalent to 120-180. The US number is around 40,000. Let that sink in for a\nwhile.\n\nThe problem with guns are virtually none existing in the UK.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.045"
    },
    {
        "id": 16383494,
        "hacker": "hvidgaard",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 101,
        "comment": "That still a kinda walled garden. What I'm imagining is like email. You choose\nyour prefered frontend (email client), and pay for x vendors content (email\nproviders). The communication between client and providers is standardized.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13669558,
        "hacker": "dpark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 102,
        "comment": "My German is really bad but there seems to be little of substance here. One of\nthe first results cites \"the internet rumor mill\".\n\nI'm not saying it's guaranteed untrue, but it seems without real evidence and\ntherefore without merit.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.087"
    },
    {
        "id": 4665001,
        "hacker": "dpark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 102,
        "comment": "I don't think the patent office or judicial system generally refers to\nWikipedia for what constitutes an implementation.\n\nThis invention is obvious and trivial and there seems to be lots of prior art.\nI'm not sure why you still seem to think I'm defending it. Regardless,\ndescribing how these lists should be constructed would not make this any less\ntrivial or obvious.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.061"
    },
    {
        "id": 3945929,
        "hacker": "dpark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 102,
        "comment": "The honestly, maybe you just shouldn't be so sensitive. The suggestions made\nwere not harsh or insulting. If this kind of gentle feedback is so hurtful,\nthen not sharing code is probably the right choice for you.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.127"
    },
    {
        "id": 3694628,
        "hacker": "dpark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 102,
        "comment": "There's a large area between \"power user\" and \"computer illiterate\". I have no\ndoubt that there were some users who were so confused by the taskbar grouping\nthat they never learned the new behavior, but I cannot believe that this was a\ncommon response. (Wouldn't those people actually return their PCs to the\nstore?)\n\nSorry, but just I can't accept that the vast majority of computer users are\nmorons who can't understand it at all when interfaces change and have to start\nat square one every time. This is too cynical.\n\nThe taskbar grouping was not _that_ big of a change. Users look for icons in\nthe taskbar, so dropping the labels was pretty minor. The grouping behavior\nitself was quite discoverable. If you ask an XP user who's just switched to\nWin7 to open a couple of word documents, and a web browser, and a few more\nthings (enough to trigger grouping), and then ask them to go back to the word\ndocument, they'll be able to do it. They'll look in the task bar, click on the\nicon for Word, and then when the window thumbnails pop up, they's say \"what's\nthis?\" and then click on one of the thumbnails. Functionality discovered. Yes,\nthere's some initial confusion, but I'd hardly call it a \"re-learning\" of the\nentire OS.\n\nI also can't believe that Microsoft would have added the grouping if focus\ngroups showed that average users were so lost that it was like using a new OS.\nThere's not enough value added by grouping to ship it if it significantly hurt\ntypical users' experiences.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.052"
    },
    {
        "id": 2874397,
        "hacker": "dpark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 102,
        "comment": "I'd argue it's still a case of deception. The fact that the patent is poorly\ntitled doesn't change that. If the patent were titled \"wheel and axle\" but\ncontained its current content, it would still be misleading to say that\nsomeone had patented the wheel and axle.\n\nAnd no, I don't feel like digging through a bunch of anti-patent articles\nlooking for misleading claims. Even if this were the only example, the point\nwould stand that using misleading claims makes it harder to trust the\nmovement.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 14220712,
        "hacker": "dpark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 102,
        "comment": "> _But what you 're ignoring is the great number of bad things that lawyers\n> don't do because either a) they are afraid of the professional consequences,\n> b) they can get their clients to easily back off because they say,\n> \"professional ethics!\" and people know it's a real thing, or c) they get\n> disbarred and can't act as a lawyer any more._\n\nMost lawyers don't do bad things because they're decent people. Ethics codes\ndon't stop unethical behavior any more than laws stop crimes. There is some\nsmall percentage of the population who will shy away from a crime specifically\nbecause of the potential punishment, but most people wouldn't steal or murder\nregardless of the law. Ditto for lawyers.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.040"
    },
    {
        "id": 17551201,
        "hacker": "dpark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 102,
        "comment": "> _She didn 't presume guilt. She factored evidence of guilt into her\n> sentencing decision._\n\nWhat does that mean? How do you factor in \"evidence of guilt\" without assuming\nguilt? That is absurd.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.406"
    },
    {
        "id": 18204137,
        "hacker": "dpark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 102,
        "comment": "Does it? I don’t have the book, but it sounds from the review that this is a\npet theory with no scientific backing.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14700215,
        "hacker": "candiodari",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 103,
        "comment": "Generally cells get cancer after having processed a certain amount of energy.\nThat means that some fly species will reach obvious senescence in a matter of\ndouble-digit hours whereas for humans it takes 60 years or so. But cell-for\ncell, the cells in those bodies do \"about\" the same in terms of watts that go\nthrough them (nanowatts in reality, of course).\n\nThis is related to age and cell count, but it's not the only factor. For\ninstance when an animal becomes larger, the size of the animal goes up with\nthe third power, while energy use only goes up with the second power. So the\nbigger an animal, the less individual cells can do.\n\nThe way to arrive at this insight is to imagine animals are balls. To about a\nfactor 2 this is accurate. The energy use is limited by energy exchange with\nthe outside world, ie, it's limited by the amount of skin they have, which is\nthe surface of the ball. The amount of cells is related to the volume the\nanimal occupies.\n\nThe net effect of this is that bigger animals live longer. Some details are\ndifferent too. For instance, larger animals tend to have larger cells. So the\ncell count goes up, but not by as much you'd think (If humans had mouse-sized\ncells in their tissues we'd be on average 54cm).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 18209686,
        "hacker": "candiodari",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 103,
        "comment": "That just means the algorithms don't work well enough or don't have enough\ndata yet. Also there's a little bit of bad incentives here: these companies\nalso get paid for showing you something at all.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.222"
    },
    {
        "id": 20085861,
        "hacker": "candiodari",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 103,
        "comment": "> They would be returned to their legal guardian, foster parent or otherwise.\n> How does this not apply to any child?\n\nThe point is _who_ they get returned to, of course, and how they see those\npeople. Children outside of foster care get returned to the situation they\n_know_. Inside youth services or foster care, not so much.\n\nAlso you and I both know that if they run away re-placement into an\ninstitution will not be far behind. So even though you say it's the same, it's\nnot. It's just not. And yeah I get that part of the reason is that a child\nthat runs away from their biological parents simply doesn't realize\ninstitutions exist. They actually believe the lies, that the police will fix\nthings.\n\n> Again, you're talking to an actual foster parent. Our children have a\n> healthy relationship with their case managers, GALs, therapists, teachers,\n> etc.\n\nYes, and if you were ever a foster kid you would know that you have to make\nDAMN sure they believe so. And that it's never actually the case.\n\nAs a kid in youth services you have 2 choices, you will eventually realize.\nAll these people MUST think you're just about fine (but that they're still\nable to \"help\"), or they must be scared of you. Anything else leads to \"help\",\nwhich is a disaster, or to \"treatment\", catastrophe. Yes this sentence\ncontains a hint as to why I might have negative feelings about these people.\n\nSorry to pop your bubble, but these kids are lying, scheming, faking and\ncheating you. And neither you or I will blame them for that (you are going to\nget mad when you realize though. It'll pass, but the damage will be done).\nThough kids in youth services in my experience have a bit of a \"brutal honesty\nhabit\", so maybe you should ask. But be careful: like safety can't be\nrestored, you also cannot \"unhear\" the sentence \"I'm doing this to prevent\nworse\", and you may realize that the clock is ticking, that they have taught\nthemselves not to care about you and lie about it, that they have gotten\nplenty of practice at this and are far better at it than you are at\nidentifying it and that thought, too, cannot be \"unthought of\".\n\nDo you realize the violence your will kids face if you or their therapist or\ntheir teacher were to even just doubt that they're fine ? Do you think someone\ncan develop normally knowing this ? Don't you think that, perhaps, there's\nsomething you're missing ? That this absurd situation you think you see in\nyour kids is perhaps simply not real ?\n\nThey are faking it and in reality their \"safe\" environment is causing extreme\nstress because they cannot ever let their guard down. The only minimal\nremainder of control they have is utterly and critically dependent on everyone\nbelieving everything is fine. They cannot ever be honest to almost anyone. I\nmean I hope it's not like this in your case of course, but ...\n\n> This is a movie. It is \"based on\" a real story, but look up what \"based on\"\n> really means. Not much.\n\nYes, the psychological reactions of these kids have been pared down to a\ncompletely unrealistically peaceful level. Nobody in such a situation reacts\nas controlled as the kids in this movie do. Also they have systematically\navoided showing the even worse sides of youth services, such as the initial\ntaking away of the kids, the institutions, the complete and total idiots that\nare the employees, supervisors and therapists, the ruins with barbed wire they\nhouse the kids in, the fact that your \"hyperkinetism\" treatment is never going\nto fix your teacher (meaning the problem youth care solves is NEVER the kid,\nbut ALWAYS the kid is the one punished/treated/locked up/... It never works\nbecause you cannot fix a leaky car tire no matter what you do with the bike in\nthe trunk), the constant replacement/changes (you NEVER have the same\nconsultant twice. Just doesn't happen. They quit before they'd see you twice),\nthe \"time out\" prisons, they show the many court cases only by showing a bag\nof bears instead of the constant crying and the beatings and fights by the\npolice officers in the waiting rooms, the group of terrified children\ncollapsing quietly in their chairs or looking for a fight, the moment a child\nrealizes that the therapists outright only care about you while they're being\npaid for it, or the ones where it's not even for their pay but who do it to\npsychologically insulate themselves ... Reality is _far_ worse on all fronts.\n\nHave you ever seen a 5 year old in an institution in this situation: it's one\nof their first days, they've just calmed down a bit. They actually connect to\none of those group supervisors. And they do what kids do, in such a difficult\nsituation: they start following them around. The kid thinks this supervisor\ncares. Now you're about to say: she does. SHE probably thinks she does (like\nyou do). But she doesn't: that's not allowed. So at 6pm, at the door to the\ngroup, this 5 year old learns: the supervisor doesn't care. She (it's usually\na she) is not allowed to care. The kid is violently torn away from this\nsupervisor it was trying to attach itself to, and the child realizes how it's\ngoing to be from now on: EVERYBODY rejects you. Whether they want to or not.\nIt's just a matter of time. The realization dawns. It becomes very suddenly\nvery clear why every kid is just lying around in the sofa, avoiding every\ncontact they can avoid, avoiding to be confronted AGAIN with the forced or\nreal rejections.\n\nThen they're in their room for days, crying. They stop eating for a day or\ntwo. They realize what a horrific mistake they've made by not preventing\nthemselves from ending up here, that it's never going end, ever. That the\nother kids were telling the truth and not at all trying to be mean.\n\nNone of the adults understand. Well that's not true, they do. But their job\ndepends on them not understanding: either they refuse to understand that this\nis what happens to all the kids, or they're not there anymore tomorrow (it's\nsometimes about the money if they're freelancers, but more often it's just a\nfilter).\n\nYou don't realize that for your kids you're like this supervisor, at 16h,\nbefore they go home at 18h. You are going to reject your kids. That's a\ncertainty. The kids realize this, but know that pointing this out to you will\nlead to disaster, a further bout of sudden violence against them, completely\nuncertainty about what comes next. What's next in that case could literally be\na jail cell.\n\nAnd to youth services you're nothing but a bed: one more kid they can \"save\".\nDisgusting assholes.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.038"
    },
    {
        "id": 10256901,
        "hacker": "ant6n",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 104,
        "comment": "\"(...) liberals and minorities, who also feel (...) america is actually not\nliberal enough\" Are you serious? America is basically a conservative, corrupt\ndystopia.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.208"
    },
    {
        "id": 13066260,
        "hacker": "ant6n",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 104,
        "comment": "Neat. Does that board run linux? Can I hook up a screen, mouse and keyboard?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18063913,
        "hacker": "ant6n",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 104,
        "comment": "I think you're conflating two meanings of the word 'bazaar' in this context.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12034710,
        "hacker": "DanWaterworth",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 105,
        "comment": "This is what I'm doing with plastic [1], though it also has some semantic\ndifferences: strict instead of lazy, monads become objects.\n\n[1] https://github.com/DanielWaterworth/plastic\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 13264333,
        "hacker": "DanWaterworth",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 105,
        "comment": "When you need that kind of behaviour, you can't replace it with something flat\n(without doing binary searches or similiar at each crossing). Sometimes\nintrusive lists are the right thing.\n\nI built something once that used intrusive skiplists because it needed to\nexpire elements using one ordering and search them by another. It would have\nbeen much less efficient if I'd have broken it up into multiple flat\nrepresentations.\n\n(Actually, it was flat, but explaining that aspect of it is quite difficult).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.026"
    },
    {
        "id": 4360126,
        "hacker": "DanWaterworth",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 105,
        "comment": "And a diminished ability to add features in the future.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3816894,
        "hacker": "DanWaterworth",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 105,
        "comment": "You can sling dicts around in Haskell too if you want to. The reason people\ndon't is that the alternative is easier.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14635209,
        "hacker": "0xbear",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 106,
        "comment": "Why do you need to know the streets if GPS and maps are built into everything?\nIt's like saying, oh no, those \"automobiles\" are no good, their drivers don't\neven know how to feed a horse. Frankly I _want_ them to rely on GPS. Or else\nthey can (and do) drive you the route which maximizes their miles billed.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.350"
    },
    {
        "id": 15146717,
        "hacker": "0xbear",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 106,
        "comment": "That would be a bad metric for those \"negative\" folks as well. Their job is\ncalled \"code cultivation\", and they modify everything in Google's monorepo to\nmake it suck less. Often this is done using automated tools, with a subsequent\nfull run of affected tests and human code review. I've never seen anything\nlike this anywhere else, and I probably won't for the rest of my career.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.136"
    },
    {
        "id": 15057171,
        "hacker": "0xbear",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 106,
        "comment": ">> Several women who worked at the company and quit say their time at Google\nwas often frustrating\n\nThat's the overarching problem with being a member of the designated victim\nclass: you can blame your misfortune on being a member of the class, rather\nthan realize that 90% of people at Google aren't really having the time of\ntheir lives either. News flash: people do leave Google. If things were awesome\nfor them, they wouldn't leave.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.145"
    },
    {
        "id": 15614719,
        "hacker": "0xbear",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 106,
        "comment": "That’s not a lifting regimen. You don’t need crunches if you’re doing heavy\nsquats or deadlifts. You don’t need bicep curls at all. And chest press must\nbe balanced with barbell rows. As to how many reps, I only do 10 or more reps\nduring warmup. From there on out it’s 5 reps per set or so, and at the end I\ndo a few heavy singles at about 85-90% of PR.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.067"
    },
    {
        "id": 21200009,
        "hacker": "anonytrary",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 107,
        "comment": "A conspicuous hatch in the ground isn't that interesting, but when you cover\nit with leaves and twigs and give it a weathered look, it suddenly becomes the\nmost interesting thing in the world.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.375"
    },
    {
        "id": 16044174,
        "hacker": "anonytrary",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 107,
        "comment": "Sounds like humans being the idiots and scum of the earth that they are.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.550"
    },
    {
        "id": 21309272,
        "hacker": "anonytrary",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 107,
        "comment": "I _only_ use nightlight (~red tint) on all of my devices at all times and\npeople think I'm crazy. I can't even go back to normal -- it physically hurts\nand everything just looks super blue.\n\nWanting to lower the energy of photons that are about to hit your face and get\nfocused into the back of your eye is completely reasonable. The only argument\nagainst this practice is that the effects of LED screens is negligible, which\nis apparently false according to this paper.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.026"
    },
    {
        "id": 897142,
        "hacker": "iterationx",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 108,
        "comment": "Getting a viral std is 1-way function. You'll definitely get HPV and maybe\nherpes.\n\nIf you are socially awkward that means you have terrible body language. Read a\nfew books about body language. Why don't you work on your social circle, get\nmore friends then you will get invited to more parties, then when girls meet\nyou they will be more open to you because they met you through a friend.\nBeyond that join a gym, smile, be funny, not desperate and your girl problems\nwill go away.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.049"
    },
    {
        "id": 918085,
        "hacker": "iterationx",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 108,
        "comment": "A superior Chinese language search engine coupled with a deep(er) recession in\nthe US would hurt their profit machine. The web could also change with regards\nto categorization. For example if I want a book I go to Amazon, if I want to\nlearn about boardgames, I go to boardgamegeek, if I want general knowledge I\ngo to wikipedia. So on a long enough time line if I want to do X on the web, I\ngo to Y. Where Y is not Google. Also I assume one of these days someone will\nfigure out how to implement a metaverse that everyone wants to use and then\nsearching might be different there as well. Or maybe Wolfram will figure out\nsomething useful to do with his engine.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 2012764,
        "hacker": "iterationx",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 108,
        "comment": "THE $25,000,000,000 ∗ EIGENVECTOR THE LINEAR ALGEBRA BEHIND GOOGLE\nhttp://www.rose-hulman.edu/~bryan/googleFinalVersionFixed.pd...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 9795358,
        "hacker": "crb002",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 109,
        "comment": "The collected works of Richard Buchi is going for $10 on Amazon. Amazing\ninsight into automata reseach during the 1960s.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.600"
    },
    {
        "id": 17560574,
        "hacker": "crb002",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 109,
        "comment": "Is that the one where he bounds between exponential growing trapezoids? I\nrecall it being used by his student Jack Lutz like crazy in his complexity\ntheory classes.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.600"
    },
    {
        "id": 20980618,
        "hacker": "crb002",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 109,
        "comment": "HP and HPE split. Looks like HP is going to shit.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 15891181,
        "hacker": "Frogolocalypse",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 110,
        "comment": "http://edition.cnn.com/2012/10/18/us/elephant-hair/index.htm...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14832336,
        "hacker": "Frogolocalypse",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 110,
        "comment": "> I think that its quite possible that we can see scaling of 1000x on the\n> linear blockchain\n\nIn order for your fantasy to become a reality the tens of thousands of current\nusers of the core ref nodes would have to uninstall their node clients and\npermanently remove their ability to ever validate their transactions on the\nblockchain. That is never going to happen.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15840108,
        "hacker": "Frogolocalypse",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 110,
        "comment": "Mining was never even mentioned in the white paper because it is immaterial to\nconsensus. As has just been demonstrated. Again.\n\nAnd that argument is getting tired. You need to update your script.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 6361826,
        "hacker": "TrainedMonkey",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 111,
        "comment": "Unless there is a \"bug\" in software that accidentally uploads all the data to\nsecure servers under certain conditions, that for \"some reason\" was left over\nfrom debugging stage of the product. Unless we see source code and actual A7 +\nMotion chimp design blueprints that they use at the factory, I will always be\nskeptical. All that said I will be getting 5S anyways, because device looks\nrock solid.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.019"
    },
    {
        "id": 7226419,
        "hacker": "TrainedMonkey",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 111,
        "comment": "Alas, I am too late: \"Server doing weird things, come back tomorrow. \"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 7275102,
        "hacker": "TrainedMonkey",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 111,
        "comment": "\"This story is dark like dark chocolate and dramatic like that swirly dark-\nwhite chocolate\" pronounced TrainedMonkey while munching on thin mint girl\nscout cookie.\n\nSeriously do not buy Hershey's products.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.160"
    },
    {
        "id": 7280405,
        "hacker": "TrainedMonkey",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 111,
        "comment": "It is still alive and is pretty affordable now:\nhttp://thermaltakeusa.com/store/Product.aspx?C=1014&SC=1017&...\n\nI will stick with my 900D though.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.175"
    },
    {
        "id": 1523684,
        "hacker": "mathgladiator",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 112,
        "comment": "obvious to hackers = novel to suits\n\n:(\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.375"
    },
    {
        "id": 1744650,
        "hacker": "mathgladiator",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 112,
        "comment": "I try to look at the bigger picture think how can companies like yours help\ncompanies like mine starting up so we can tear down the entrenched SQL forces.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.052"
    },
    {
        "id": 2618603,
        "hacker": "mathgladiator",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 112,
        "comment": "I would be a loving parent, but that's not in my card.\n\nI love my kids so much, that I'm not going to create them in the first place\nto subject them to the horrors of this world and the ultimate fear of death.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.231"
    },
    {
        "id": 10845675,
        "hacker": "michaelmrose",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 113,
        "comment": "Which doesn't make it wrong.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 20826334,
        "hacker": "michaelmrose",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 113,
        "comment": "Anecdotally cheaper brands of power tools seem to have a higher rate of return\ndespite being mostly sold to consumers who are extremely likely to use tools\nin a less demanding fashion compared to contractors that who buy more\nexpensive tools. This leads one to believe that the more expensive brands are\nbetter made and more durable and therefore worth the premium. If you time your\npurchases around frequent promotions you probably will pay less than 2x for\nthe better quality tool and may well even save money in the long run.\n\nExample if you pay 1.8x the cost for a tool that lasts 10 years vs 1x for 4\nyears of service you will actually have paid LESS not more.\n\nOne also notices that pro's tend to buy brand name tools rather than budget\nbrands even when they are budget conscious in other ways.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.091"
    },
    {
        "id": 19222854,
        "hacker": "michaelmrose",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 113,
        "comment": "If your kid for any reason including swim diapers sucking can't keep from\nshitting up the pool your kid just has to wait until this isn't true to swim\ndoesn't seem like a hard choice.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.029"
    },
    {
        "id": 17286343,
        "hacker": "michaelmrose",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 113,
        "comment": "I'm going to pretend this is a real question asked in good faith in case it\nis.\n\nAt present the internet is more or less a neutral marketplace in which\neveryone pays their way to get packets from source to destination. Much of\nAmerica is served by only one to two members of a small group of huge isps who\nhave more to gain from bilking me and you than from competing with each other.\n\nIf we let a cartel of isp who are the only way you can get internet access in\na reasonable fashion decide who is allowed to do business on the internet and\nin what fashion you will find that your basic package ends up costing more\nthan your present open internet and any perceived discount whatsoever is\noutweighed by the money that people like netflix pay per subscriber for access\nand must necessarily recoup by charging you for.\n\nIf the media companies even let players like netflix survive instead of slowly\nstrangling them this sucks for you and netflix but as for future players they\naren't part of the in group that is allowed to do business at a reasonable\nrate and they just never get off the ground.\n\nThe system you are ok with would have strangled kids like youtube and netflix\nin their cribs.\n\nThe basic economics of it is allowing them to decide what is served and at\nwhat individualized price changes the economics of the cost of internet\ncompanies serving customers from what a competitive market can charge\n(internet backend) to the most a market can bear under a monopoly (the last\nmile).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 17969256,
        "hacker": "glitchc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 114,
        "comment": "It's not moral panic. Vaping is just as harmful as smoking. Combustion is\nstill the main chemical reaction, and the resultant compounds are just as\ntoxic. They only smell nicer.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.056"
    },
    {
        "id": 19473266,
        "hacker": "glitchc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 114,
        "comment": "This is silly. If overflow is really a concern, use Welford’s algorithm to\ncompute a running mean. It avoids the sum -> float overflow issue.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.204"
    },
    {
        "id": 21192845,
        "hacker": "glitchc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 114,
        "comment": "How terribly boring such a movie would be. No snappy dialogue? Witty repartee\nbetween protagonist and antagonist? No deep thoughts on the moral corruption\nof society? Godfather without dialogue? Joker without dialogue?\n\nI guess you only like watching Michael Bay specials, explosions convey\ndestruction really well I hear.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.043"
    },
    {
        "id": 8485780,
        "hacker": "MBCook",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 115,
        "comment": "Yeah, but it makes a good story. I know I got scared after making quite a bit\nof money on a small (few hundred dollar) buy in TSLA when it started dropping\nand got out. I thought I got lucky to make a few times return (I did) and\ndidn't want to push my luck so I sold my few shares.\n\nToday TSLA is worth at least 3x what I sold for, but I never would have held\nthough all those ups and downs let alone for two decades. I didn't buy the\nstock as a real investment, just a little fun in a company I liked.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.091"
    },
    {
        "id": 5103988,
        "hacker": "MBCook",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 115,
        "comment": "No, those have to comply with FCC regulations to ensure that the signal they\nare sending out isn't stomping over all the other bands.\n\nThis has no filtering at all.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 17493506,
        "hacker": "MBCook",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 115,
        "comment": "You’re just moving the problem though. The sites won’t get chargebacks, the\ngroups selling the coin to consumers will.\n\nBuy it with another crypto currency? Problem moves one step down the road\nagain.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.156"
    },
    {
        "id": 5625165,
        "hacker": "dorian-graph",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 116,
        "comment": "A lot of those examples you gave so easy to do from home, in a bedroom or\ntoilet. The military use example seems fine and some useful HUD type\ninformation would be neat.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.203"
    },
    {
        "id": 3346408,
        "hacker": "dorian-graph",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 116,
        "comment": "Sorry if this is a tired question, but, does Chocolat have vim bindings or are\nthere any plans for it to?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.450"
    },
    {
        "id": 20595893,
        "hacker": "dorian-graph",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 116,
        "comment": "I've spent at least 6+ straight months on iTerm2 3.x, kitty, and Alacritty (my\ncurrent primary terminal), and briefly tried Terminal. Terminal is waaay\nfaster. The only thing that's stopping me from using it as my primary terminal\nis the poor colour support and poor split window support (and setting\nshortcuts to go between them).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.020"
    },
    {
        "id": 16623603,
        "hacker": "dorian-graph",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 116,
        "comment": "> With all due respect, I'd say this is definitely a product of your specific\n> location/life circumstances.\n\nWell, we are talking about Australia... I don't think the poster was talking\nabout the whole world.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.019"
    },
    {
        "id": 14613617,
        "hacker": "pfarnsworth",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 117,
        "comment": "You're no longer making any sense. I still believe the media is terribly\nbiased. And this is Waymo's own testimony that Kalanick asked to destroy the\ndocuments once he found out about them. How could there be a conspiracy?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 15260554,
        "hacker": "pfarnsworth",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 117,
        "comment": "Exactly, look at the simple answer, as you said. I'm not sure why people think\nthis is such a controversial viewpoint. It's pretty obvious that ISIS was a\nbig threat in 2015-2016 to the entire Middle East and that just so happens to\ncorrespond to when Saudi Arabia started acting irrationally in terms of its\noil output. I'm not sure why this is so hard to believe that it's related.\n\nThe oil sands have been in business for the last 40 years. You're telling me\nnow is when they feel the Canadian oil sands are a threat? In the last 2 years\nis when they decide to act irrationally and start dumping oil? Hogwash.\n\nISIS controlled large portions of Syria's oil output. But their operations in\nIraq are much larger.\n\nhttps://www.forbes.com/sites/timdaiss/2016/08/26/why-islamic...\n\nAlso from the article: ISIS used to earn some $30 million monthly from its oil\noperations, but revenues were down to around $15 million a month at the\nbeginning of the year, according to Christopher Garver, spokesman for\nOperation Tidal Wave.\n\nISIS's claim to be a caliphate hinges on their ability to maintain a\ngovernment-like status. They can continue doing this if they make $30M/month.\nBut the US is hamstrung because they want to stop ISIS from taking advantage\nof the oil in Northern Iraq, but they can't bomb all the fields, otherwise it\nwill cripple Iraq going forward.\n\nSo the best way to hurt ISIS and the Caliphate is by hitting their major\nsource of income, which is oil, but cutting the price. If legit oil is\n$40/barrel instead of $100, and the caliphate can't afford to maintain their\nstructure, then it implicitly collapse. Did you notice that after Hurricane\nHarvey, the US used that as an excuse to dump oil from the SPR? The problem\nisn't oil, it's the refineries in Houston that were taken offline. Releasing\noil from the SPR made no sense because we're already in a glut, except to keep\npressure on oil to stay low.\n\nAgain, I don't know why this is so hard for some people to believe. It's not a\nconspiracy theory, it makes a lot of sense, and I support it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.018"
    },
    {
        "id": 16663232,
        "hacker": "pfarnsworth",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 117,
        "comment": "They were driving in San Francisco up until the accident, and stopped their\ntests.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13068001,
        "hacker": "wnevets",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 118,
        "comment": "you're right, its not even coded hate speech.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.257"
    },
    {
        "id": 8589621,
        "hacker": "wnevets",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 118,
        "comment": "Thanks for the effort. Chrome is actually throwing a \"Uncommon\" warning on\nboth files, which I guess is better than a malware warning.\n\nhttps://support.google.com/chrome/answer/4412392?p=ib_downlo...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.375"
    },
    {
        "id": 11763436,
        "hacker": "wnevets",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 118,
        "comment": "Now if only we could get crazy conservatives to boycott facebook.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 13464672,
        "hacker": "FireBeyond",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 119,
        "comment": "The British TV series, \"Yes Minister\"\n(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yes_Minister) and \"Yes Prime Minister\" was a\nsatirical series based around exactly that premise - a clueless politician who\nfelt he was making all the decisions, and the actual power-behind-the-scenes\nbureaucrat who did. Although aging, it is still scarily accurate, if not more\nso.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.080"
    },
    {
        "id": 15267482,
        "hacker": "FireBeyond",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 119,
        "comment": "As of Friday, all three credit services online freeze processes were \"broken\"\ndue to demand (and/or other crappiness).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.217"
    },
    {
        "id": 7112719,
        "hacker": "FireBeyond",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 119,
        "comment": "I will stand partially corrected on the issue of you changing your name for\nthe purpose of the suit.\n\nHowever - you are amazingly cagey, and very specifically wordy around the\nissue of your birth name.\n\n“My name is legally Violet Blue.”\n\nYou make claims of having never changed your name.\n\nYou post (redacted) pictures of your passport on your blog\n(http://www.tinynibbles.com/blogarchives/2008/08/about-those-...) as “proof”\nof your name (certainly, currently), but the idea of posting similarly\nredacted birth certificates “is really a scary thought”.\n\n\"My name is Violet Blue. As I have proven, provided evidence, and provided\nplentiful witness testimony (and have had legally acknowledged) to and by the\nUS Patent and Trademark Office and the Federal Court of the 9th Circuit, I\nhave been using my name Violet Blue related to the goods and services of my\nbrand, “(…) since 1999, “\n\nwhich, if you actually read, does nothing to bolster your claim that it’s your\nbirth name.\n\nAlso funny that your birth place and year are redacted everywhere, including\nWikipedia.\n\nThe irony of all this is that it doesn’t really matter what your birth name\nwas or is, and whether it’s really anyone’s business is highly doubtful. But\nto pretend it’s all on other people, and act as though you’re this entirely\nvictimized person, and not fanning the flames is a little disingenuous.\n\nSadly, my access to LN is unavailable at the moment - but I’m curious, of all\nthe filings you could link to, why only a preliminary injunction - you talk of\nCourt findings and acknowledgments, but you settled. Courts don’t issue\nfindings unless they issue a judgment, not when there’s a settlement.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.020"
    },
    {
        "id": 10376470,
        "hacker": "FireBeyond",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 119,
        "comment": "Or, the really simple explanation - a big courtyard fountain, that doesn't\nrecirculate. There's been examples of this in the past, fountain blasting\naway, and just draining the water.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 15520477,
        "hacker": "emmelaich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 120,
        "comment": "Really? I'm Australian and I've worked in factories, in airlines, in\ngovernment, in the country and the city and I have never seen or heard overt\nracism.\n\nI did see it in Netherlands though. I also worked for a few years in\nNetherlands, and I was shocked to see a woman, one of the management / HR mock\nthe only black employee relentlessly with monkey noises.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.186"
    },
    {
        "id": 4206205,
        "hacker": "emmelaich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 120,
        "comment": "I agree. The Logitech Squeezebox does the same thing. It's wrong. And\nplaylists are essential but underexposed on the Squeezebox.\n\nSpeaking of Logitech, I wonder if Google collaborated with them for the Q.\nThey did for Google TV.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 4213065,
        "hacker": "emmelaich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 120,
        "comment": "My son has just started doing Industrial Arts at school. A lot of it just\nseems to be dreadful spouting of design and architecture jargon.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-1.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9358859,
        "hacker": "emmelaich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 120,
        "comment": "The simplest Makefile is ... no Makefile at all!\n\ne.g. if you create C program your-program.c with a main(), all you have to do\nis invoke\n\n    \n    \n        make your-program\n    \n\nand it is done.\n\nNot exactly production quality (no clean target) but can't beat it for\nsimplicity :-)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.090"
    },
    {
        "id": 11393028,
        "hacker": "emmelaich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 120,
        "comment": "Not necessary; just download the iso. Well, the iso maker on another Windows\nmachine.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 16374225,
        "hacker": "emmelaich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 120,
        "comment": "Pretty much just stock Android and price.\n\nBut I suspect that the Nexus phones have problems because either Google are\ntoo ambitious and pushy or differences* between Google and the hardware\nmanufacturer make things less reliable.\n\n* differences such as culture and communication.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.107"
    },
    {
        "id": 16494138,
        "hacker": "emmelaich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 120,
        "comment": "Yeah, no-one in the west liked him much either. Perhaps it takes an angry\nunpleasant person to tell the truth?\n\nThanks for the link; I'll look it up.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.030"
    },
    {
        "id": 18701752,
        "hacker": "emmelaich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 120,
        "comment": "I never saw that as a criticism.\n\nJust an interesting counterpoint.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 18916878,
        "hacker": "emmelaich",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 120,
        "comment": "This would be useful to demonstrate the difference between p/f and l/r for\nthose brought up without those distinctions.\n\nI'd also (as an English speaker) like to see/hear Dutch g and Xhosan clicks.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 7951069,
        "hacker": "danielweber",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 121,
        "comment": "Halfway though, \"assume good faith\" seems like a key mantra here.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.350"
    },
    {
        "id": 4750240,
        "hacker": "danielweber",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 121,
        "comment": "How do you count a smudge instead of a complete filling-in of the oval? You\nhave humans go over them, and people hate that.\n\nJust because you _never see_ this issue doesn't mean it doesn't exist. It's\njust that the ambiguous ballots don't matter in the vast majority of elections\nso no one cares.\n\nI'm not saying computers are better than paper. They each have trade-offs.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.103"
    },
    {
        "id": 10006343,
        "hacker": "danielweber",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 121,
        "comment": "> cities at this point require a large base of low-wage service labor to\n> function\n\nIt's not really \"low-wage\" if their rents are being subsidized, randomly.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.296"
    },
    {
        "id": 8539594,
        "hacker": "danielweber",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 121,
        "comment": "You still get a massive hit from the atmosphere when you exit the tunnel if\nyou've built up any significant speed. Air pressure up there is still a third\nof air pressure at sea level.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 8074474,
        "hacker": "danielweber",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 121,
        "comment": "Don't forget to change the toolchain every few years. \"Sorry, we need someone\nwith 3 years of Docker experience.\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.350"
    },
    {
        "id": 4837550,
        "hacker": "danielweber",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 121,
        "comment": "I remember generating .map files as part of the build process that were\ninvaluable in figuring out where Windows desktop programs were crashing. It\nwas about 30 minutes of work that made 3-hour debugging sessions into 10\nminute debugging sessions from then on.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7563442,
        "hacker": "danielweber",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 121,
        "comment": "Fill in the blank: 50% of the things being compromised is ______% as bad as\nall the things being compromised.\n\nSometimes a partial compromise is easy to deal with, and the number in the\nblank is way less than 50. Lots of diverse things is good.\n\nSometimes half the units being compromised is almost as bad as all the units\nbeing compromised. Lots of diverse things is a bad thing in this environment.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.140"
    },
    {
        "id": 21157323,
        "hacker": "prepend",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 122,
        "comment": "Some people aren’t cut out for being on time to late morning meetings (930).\nIt’s a culture mismatch and there are companies that do perfectly fine with no\nmeetings before noon and whatnot.\n\nI wish there was an easier way to learn about this culture as part of the job\nsearch. I like to have candidates shadow for a day or two to meet the team and\nsee how days go.\n\nPeople who are into being on time have it as part of a larger philosophy, I\nthink. Being late for them means something specific. I don’t know if I’ve ever\nseen anyone change modes on this but it’s probably easier to change their\nphilosophy than be late to a bunch of their meetings.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.081"
    },
    {
        "id": 17881939,
        "hacker": "prepend",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 122,
        "comment": "Don’t worry, they only use it anonymously. Until they don’t want to.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 21336502,
        "hacker": "prepend",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 122,
        "comment": "Multitasking was in the OS, just not available to web sites and app\ndevelopers.\n\nJail broken apps had multitasking like screen sharing, WiFi hot spotting and\nlots of other stuff.\n\nIt’s a big deal for an OS that doesn’t have multitasking vs doesn’t allow app\ndevelopers to use.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.096"
    },
    {
        "id": 17575570,
        "hacker": "EnderMB",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 123,
        "comment": "Having switched from .NET to Ruby/Rails, I've noticed that different stacks\ntend to favour different design patterns, based on how much heavy-lifting the\nlanguage and framework does for you.\n\nFor that reason, I'd suggest picking a set of languages/frameworks, and taking\na list of the more popular design patterns on each stack. Once you've\nimplemented these, start to cross them over. You'll not only expand your\nknowledge of other languages, but you'll learn where certain frameworks have\ndeveloped abstractions that cover these patterns for you.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.149"
    },
    {
        "id": 12186050,
        "hacker": "EnderMB",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 123,
        "comment": "What a silly system! They should have used BobX instead.\n\nhttp://thedailywtf.com/articles/We-Use-BobX\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.625"
    },
    {
        "id": 14324776,
        "hacker": "EnderMB",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 123,
        "comment": "Sadly, I think there are more people that would be in favour of a private\nsystem than we'd like to admit. A lot of people have bought into the Tory idea\nthat the NHS is unsustainable, and that the reason we're all poor is because\nwe're paying for what they see as sub-par care.\n\nOn one side, the NHS is arguably the greatest success story of the UK, and I\nthink many people would riot if their free healthcare was taken away. On the\nother, people will happily vote against a party that is looking to increase\nits funding, and will happily vote for a party that has made significant moves\nto privatise our healthcare system, so logically there must be people that\naren't in favour of the NHS.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 13751631,
        "hacker": "marcoperaza",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 124,
        "comment": "Depending on the threat model and how serious you are about locking things\ndown, you might just block all such traffic.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.163"
    },
    {
        "id": 20382540,
        "hacker": "marcoperaza",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 124,
        "comment": "Beware this analysis. Intent can matter in copyright law in many important\nways, even if not on the core question of whether there was infringement.[1]\nAnd the fact that a bad actor with a big legal budget can still make hell does\nnot make something worthless. By that standard, all contracts are worthless.\nIt’s also worth remembering that not everyone is a bad actor. You can help\nsecure good will and trust by making sure that the other guy has a full\nunderstanding and proper notice of your arrangement.\n\nI don’t know much about CLAs and I’m no expert in copyright law, but I’m just\nsaying that this piece doesn’t pass the smell test. It might still be the case\nthat CLAs aren’t worth your trouble—I really don’t know—but I’d want better\nreasons that the ones in this piece.\n\n[1] https://www.trademarkandcopyrightlawblog.com/2013/12/innocen...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.071"
    },
    {
        "id": 16454006,
        "hacker": "marcoperaza",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 124,
        "comment": "Thank you for the correction. The DC Circuit is the one that heard that case,\ndeclining to overturn the FCC’s reclassification of broadband to a\n“telecommunications service”.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18774653,
        "hacker": "marcoperaza",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 124,
        "comment": "I have a 2017 Mini and I have all these problems. The audio clips and has\nother issues when played over USB, but not Bluetooth. So I have to choose\nbetween good audio and charging my phone. I’m about to buy a USB adapter that\nplugs into the cigarette lighter just to fix this problem.\n\nJust as you describe, the entertainment system UI is god awful too.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.142"
    },
    {
        "id": 10505863,
        "hacker": "kefka",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 125,
        "comment": "The way I found out is by remembering things about people whom I've not met. I\nmeet them, and 'remember'. Sometimes I get things wrong, but 95% of the time,\nthey are right.\n\nI'd be game for any sort of scientific method or test to somehow figure out if\nits confirmation bias or something else.\n\nI'd like to consider myself a man of science. And I would like to explain\nphenomenon like that. Is there a basis? If so, how?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.205"
    },
    {
        "id": 14509254,
        "hacker": "kefka",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 125,
        "comment": "I did have 1 edit, around 5 minutes in.\n\ns/world-wise/world-wide/\n\n_________________________\n\nAnd that's correct. I put no state-of-mind or otherwise speak for her. I'm\nacknowledging the complexity of highlighting a potential problem amongst your\npeers in a very public manner. Especially in Academia, where your peers\napprove, collaborate, and act as a peer, attacking them publicly could have\ndisastrous consequences.\n\nIt is \"safer\", and provides face to be accepting of such actions, be they\nintentional or unintentional.\n\n(Yes, I work in Academia. This sort of thing happens pretty regularly, from\nwhat Ive seen. What's that saying... The nail that sticks out gets the\nhammer?)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.056"
    },
    {
        "id": 12463551,
        "hacker": "kefka",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 125,
        "comment": "There's a simple path to change things here.\n\nStart criminally charging Facebook for every criminal act they fail to remove.\nIf they're playing the censor, then they need to be punished when they fail in\nthat role.\n\nThe other choice, is not to censor anything, other than by the requirements of\nthe law. Like the telephone system does.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.293"
    },
    {
        "id": 7473654,
        "hacker": "kefka",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 125,
        "comment": "It really comes down to this:\n\nIf you are working, you don't want to jeopardize your job with a lawsuit\nagainst your employer. Lest you do, you get blackballed.\n\nIf you aren't working, you cannot afford a lawyer. End of discussion.\n\nPerhaps the Justice department can do something... But then again, I'm sure it\nwill be smoothed out with greased palms to both parties.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.181"
    },
    {
        "id": 8935081,
        "hacker": "kefka",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 125,
        "comment": "I think you're on to something there. Biometrics might be the way to go here,\nbut is difficult in implementation.\n\nFirst security in layers is the best option.\n\n1\\. USB HID watcher that shuts down system when plugged in. If we use a mouse,\nwe can exclude that. But any other HID, shutdown -r now.\n\n2\\. Fingerprint scanner. It's not foolproof, but does make duplicating\nfingerprints a pain if you dont cooperate. And jailcells usually have\nconcrete. No more fingerprints :)\n\n3\\. Most laptops have webcams built in. I'm looking in OpenCV FaceRecognizer\nclass to see how it works, and if it's viable for fingerprinting a user. We\ncould also do other checks, like 3d facial recognition over multiple video\nframes.\n\n4\\. We could also potentially use the accelerometer built in laptops. When\nothers have made a sshd knock script, we could provide a knock script to the\nphysical device.\n\n5\\. Lock on ac power removal. Simple and effective, unless the enemy has AC\nseparation tools.\n\nThere's a few ideas. And of course, mix in live filesystems in ram, or\nvirtualbox funniness, and you're in business.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.081"
    },
    {
        "id": 2306816,
        "hacker": "phlux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 126,
        "comment": "/.\n\nAnd at the time - I was working as the IT manager fora company on the\npeninsula -- I switched out standard image to make the default homepage for\nall machines point to google.\n\nthis was ~1998?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 2492181,
        "hacker": "phlux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 126,
        "comment": "Maybe I am getting old and boring, but I feel like I am stuck on HN + Reddit.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.450"
    },
    {
        "id": 2421190,
        "hacker": "phlux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 126,
        "comment": "Well, since that is just a landing page, and appears to be founded by one of\nthe guys behind 500 startups -- I think i will be a matter of having a good\nidea, having a sound design for implementing that idea and getting them to\nbelieve that if you were empowered with funding you could see that idea, based\non your design developed.\n\nI belive that having a good idea/design and the credibility of some funds\nbehind you, you should be able to pay/convince a tach co-founder to work with\nyou.\n\nWhat would really be of value, as I mentioned, would be if this incubator\nprovided you with some development hours. Further it would be great if they\nprovided good development estimations based on your design.\n\nSo then they could say \"You idea and design should cost about $XXX to get it\nto stage 1 2 or 3\"\n\nStages 1 2 and 3 being, MVP, Beta, Market respectively.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.275"
    },
    {
        "id": 19440164,
        "hacker": "B1FF_PSUVM",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 127,
        "comment": "> addicted to vinyl …\n\nActually, it's way too easy to get awful snap crackle and pop from vinyl, and\ndigital media at least spare us that.\n\nBut the large format album art ... especially when labels went to the trouble\nof making it double, opening like a large book, even for a single LP ...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.092"
    },
    {
        "id": 11797850,
        "hacker": "B1FF_PSUVM",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 127,
        "comment": "> Object-oriented programming is an exceptionally bad idea\n\n'Truths as hard as fists', is one way I've seen it put in another language\n(sortof).\n\n> which could only have originated in California\n\nFlattery will get you anywhere. UTexas, in this case ...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.331"
    },
    {
        "id": 17834230,
        "hacker": "B1FF_PSUVM",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 127,
        "comment": "If you look at XIX century sources, you'll see there were groups whose idea of\nfostering human progress was to terrorize the ruling class, mostly by\npiecemeal killing of its members with guns and bombs.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 4369630,
        "hacker": "wlievens",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 128,
        "comment": "Sure it is, when we're talking about the same sensor and pixel design, which\nis implied when you say \"simply swap the sensor\". Otherwise it's a completely\ndifferent camera setup.\n\nAlso, while obviously technology has improved, the industry doesn't\nnecessarily move towards smaller pixels as a rule. To illustrate that: I work\nfor a company that designs and produces image sensors, and I can tell you that\nwe have one sensor product that has a resolution of just over one megapixel,\nbut it's larger in area than our seventy megapixel product.\n\nIt all depends on the specifics of the project, and I can imagine that\noperating in space has certain constraints that prohibit _just swapping_ in\nanother sensor. These camera's are scientific instruments, and that means\ndifferent rules apply.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.071"
    },
    {
        "id": 616422,
        "hacker": "wlievens",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 128,
        "comment": "It scrolls terribly in my experience. They probably littered the dom with\noverlapping translucent divs or something.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-1.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 633450,
        "hacker": "wlievens",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 128,
        "comment": "Big hint: whatever you did in school becomes completely irrelevant. School and\nwhatever you did there somehow ceases to be relevant when you grow up and get\na job. Seriously, school is not a big thing.\n\nI'm not talking about the skills and things you learn, these can be valuable.\nI'm talking about social order and customs.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.067"
    },
    {
        "id": 3175147,
        "hacker": "wlievens",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 128,
        "comment": "Mine has a LED that projects the ETA on the floor. That's neat.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3195339,
        "hacker": "wlievens",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 128,
        "comment": "Too bad there's so much spam in there, along the lines of \"I predict that this\nweek I will go to the gym\". Should be moderated more intensely to make it more\ninteresting.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 7800059,
        "hacker": "wlievens",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 128,
        "comment": "He is not talking about fetching a gazillion rows but about writing a\ngazilkion similar-but-not-the-same queries!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 8612252,
        "hacker": "wlievens",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 128,
        "comment": "I know that, but I don't think every material has the interesting properties\nthat Si does _for image sensors_ , i.e. it needs to basically turn photons of\nthe right wavelength range into electrons.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.393"
    },
    {
        "id": 11793663,
        "hacker": "blowski",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 129,
        "comment": "I didn't mean to imply that people who are 'welfare dependent' are workshy\nlayabouts, far from it. I meant it in the 'non-pejorative' sense of \"somebody\nwho is dependent on welfare for a majority of their income for a significant\nperiod of time\". That might be because of illness, or some other reason - I\nmake no judgement.\n\nSo, going back to the original comment, moving to a small village to make your\nbenefits go further makes it harder to find a job. Thus, you remain on welfare\nfor a longer period of time. On the other hand, if you stay in the city,\nyou're more likely to get a job, but it's also harder to eat and find good\naccommodation.\n\nSo these things are difficult. It is clearly a big social problem that people\nhave to face these kinds of difficulties.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.034"
    },
    {
        "id": 13078773,
        "hacker": "blowski",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 129,
        "comment": "Unless you're 5-0 down, so you just aim to draw repeatedly until it's declared\na stalemate.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.156"
    },
    {
        "id": 17414900,
        "hacker": "blowski",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 129,
        "comment": "ORM doesn’t have to be slow, but I have seen a lot of implementations like the\nparent comment. For example, doing a foreach over 2000 rows where an UPDATE\nwould be much, much quicker. ORMs help a lot with developing software, but you\nneed to profile and optimise - in some cases bypassing the ORM.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 3546287,
        "hacker": "wazoox",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 130,
        "comment": "OTOH, I find the habit that Americans have of calling everyone \"guys\",\nparticularly from waiters, janitors, etc, annoying and vulgar, but apparently\nthat's the habit on the other side of the pond (or am I that old?).\n\nHow would you call a person you don't know? Particularly someone with\nauthority, like a cop, border guard, etc? Just curious; so far I still\nconsider \"mister\", \"man\", \"ol'guy\" and \"chap\" to be deliberately insulting :)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.149"
    },
    {
        "id": 2609707,
        "hacker": "wazoox",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 130,
        "comment": "> _I was diving at sea last weekend. I don't dive air at 40m._\n\nGood for you. In France, you're allowed breathe air down to 60m. Most people\ncommonly breathe air down to 40/50m, or did so recently enough.\n\n> _Your other comments about narcosis are sheer nonsense, completely off base.\n> Don't breathe narcotic mixes._\n\nMy oh so numerous comments about narcosis? What are you talking about? Instead\nof giving condescending lessons, would mind explain what you mean?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.042"
    },
    {
        "id": 19969740,
        "hacker": "wazoox",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 130,
        "comment": "Case in point, the \"fake news\" law in France: it basically asks Facebook and\nfriends to\n\n1° detect abuse, propaganda and \"fake news\" 2° remove it automatically.\n\nSo they're handed altogether the power of police, jury and executioner.\nThey're already much too powerful, and they were just given much more power\nfor free. What will become of free speech under these conditions? Do you think\nTwitter will flag Macron's tweets when he spouts out blatant lies, which is\nactually quite often?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.020"
    },
    {
        "id": 12053056,
        "hacker": "coldcode",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 131,
        "comment": "Meanwhile idiot Apple sits on their NFC api which can do all the same things\nas Android, except they're idiots and keep it to themselves. Meanwhile we\nstruggle to get iBeacons to do anything even remotely useful to us.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.325"
    },
    {
        "id": 13998992,
        "hacker": "coldcode",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 131,
        "comment": "To me this seems like a dead end business to be in, too many competitors in\nlimited markets (like SF or NY), competition with brick and mortar options\n(Joe's Deli etc), and enormous cost of acquisition trying to outdo the\ncompetition. This seems like a market for one winner and lots of losers. Is\ninvesting $120M in such a business a good idea? You have almost zero ability\nto innovate and produce something better than your competitors, so why even\nget into this?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.154"
    },
    {
        "id": 8462964,
        "hacker": "coldcode",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 131,
        "comment": "Imagine someone gets infected by a borderline patient before they are\nquarantined, like the nurse. Imagine this person is an undocumented worker or\npoor individual who eventually gets sick and is afraid or unable to afford\nhealthcare and infects those around them. At this point you have a real\nproblem as people are walking around unknowingly infecting others who also\neventually either find a doctor who is unprepared for patients walking in with\nEbola, or hopefully a hospital that is ready. I don't find this scenario\nunlikely at all. In the US there is limited legal means to force quarantines\non large masses of people much less any place to put them. Imagine one going\nto an NFL football game. How do you trace 60,000 people and all their\ncontacts?\n\nHopefully none of the exposed people will fit this scenario but you only need\none free infectious person you don't know about.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.109"
    },
    {
        "id": 9063399,
        "hacker": "coldcode",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 131,
        "comment": "If the bookings were on United's website (it doesn't say exactly) then they\nshould be liable regardless of how it got that way. If the bookings were on\nanother website then the DOT will likely agree with United. Having worked for\na large travel OTA, the rules for the taker of money are different than for a\nthird party who only collects the data but not the money.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.052"
    },
    {
        "id": 7491716,
        "hacker": "emiliobumachar",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 132,
        "comment": "I don't know, but I infer that it should mean getting paid on the end of each\nweek. If the startup suddenly goes bankrupt, you only lost a week.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.104"
    },
    {
        "id": 20605697,
        "hacker": "emiliobumachar",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 132,
        "comment": "International funding for extensive policing would go a long way.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.017"
    },
    {
        "id": 19005624,
        "hacker": "emiliobumachar",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 132,
        "comment": "Insightful. By advertising, lobbying and bribing their way into dominance, the\ncar industry has created demand for private walkable city center substitutes.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 16725149,
        "hacker": "sulam",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 133,
        "comment": "I have had the same solution to the same problem for enough years now that I\nfinally realized I could have just invested in some custom in-ear monitors and\npay it back in terms of new headphones purchased after non-replaceable cables\nwear out. I did that over 4 years ago now and haven't regretted it yet.\n\nhttps://jhaudio.com if you're looking for a specific recommendation, but there\nare many alternatives.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.080"
    },
    {
        "id": 18126958,
        "hacker": "sulam",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 133,
        "comment": "\"The amount of instances multiplying was also clogging up our DevOps team.\"\n\nLet's pause a moment and appreciate that if you have a DevOps team, you're not\ndoing DevOps.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9433451,
        "hacker": "sulam",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 133,
        "comment": "Not sure that this is doing what it's supposed to. This series:\n\n11/1/2008, 12/1/2008, 6/1/2009\n\ntransformed to this:\n\nNovember 1, 2008, November 1, 2008, November 1, 2009\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 15880059,
        "hacker": "ashark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 134,
        "comment": "More generally, following a couple easy, basic rules like:\n\n1) emphasize the most important verb by putting it first, and favor more-\nactive and more-specific verbs over very general or passive ones, as in\nputting \"increased\" ahead of \"utilized\" and \"leveraged\", and\n\n2) favor simple language (\"leverage\" or \"utilize\" can often just be \"use\", for\nexample) because, counterintuitively for middling or poor writers, simpler\nlanguage usually comes off as _more_ forceful, confident, and authoritative\nthan fancier fluff.[1] It's also easier to read, and you're less likely to\nmake small blunders that will bother some readers.\n\nimproves most writing significantly.\n\n[1] Incidentally, I think high school and university paper length requirements\nthat reward such flabby writing without without sufficiently punishing weak\nstyle choices are part of why people write that way, especially when they're\ntrying to write \"formally\".\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.136"
    },
    {
        "id": 13220614,
        "hacker": "ashark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 134,
        "comment": "They do hours and hours of planning and grading at home. Often their poor\nspouses end up helping.\n\nSource: am one of said poor spouses.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 15120343,
        "hacker": "ashark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 134,
        "comment": "My best guess is that it's the result of 20-30 years of never accepting \"shit\nhappens, we looked and everything seems basically fine, we're not changing\nanything\" as an answer when something bad happens and someone asks \"so what\nare you doing to make sure this doesn't happen again?\"—even when that answer's\nactually appropriate. The consequences are so bad if you make the do-nothing\ncall and get it wrong (or are just unlucky) that everyone does _a whole bunch\nof stuff_ to ensure they can say \"look at all the things I did!\" if lightning\nstrikes twice (or if they were simply wrong and something _did_ need to be\ndone, but it wasn't clear until a pattern emerged)\n\nInstead we always freak out and add a bunch of new policies/guidelines, some\nmore mandatory educational videos or classes, and maybe bring down the hammer\non some people as well.\n\n[EDIT] in fact it may be yet another symptom of post-Nixon-era cynicism. We\nexpect institutions to lie to us about everything (which, to be fair, they\noften do and often have), so we (rather, the media) dig into any problem\nexpecting criminality and neglect and generally bad behavior (and a _great_\nstory!), so institutions have to go nuts to make sure it never looks like\nthere's anything there worth reporting as maybe-sort-of-kind-of any of those\nbad things.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.095"
    },
    {
        "id": 18233283,
        "hacker": "darkarmani",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 135,
        "comment": "> I think MongoDB, Inc. raises a valid point wrt. developers doing all the\n> hard work including community building and a million other things, while\n> \"cloud providers\" get all the money.\n\nI think MongoDB is free loading off the the community and developers. The\ndevelopers don't get to use the software to make a profit without kicking some\nmoney upstream to mongo either. Is Mongo going to start offering money for bug\nreports and patches or do they get to freeload off of their community?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.006"
    },
    {
        "id": 8791503,
        "hacker": "darkarmani",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 135,
        "comment": "> You are also asking the sysadmin to install a closed, unreliable kernel-\n> level piece of software with that GPU\n\nUnlike all of the closed network equipment they already manage.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 5561119,
        "hacker": "darkarmani",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 135,
        "comment": "> They do it because they're afraid of the precedent that might be set by not\n> responding\n\nWhat precedent? Isn't the whole purpose of terrorism to provoke a response --\nto force a change?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 8519472,
        "hacker": "darkarmani",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 135,
        "comment": "> You have to wonder, what is the fear of drugs which is driving this?\n\nIt's near term rewards: job promotions, accomplishments, seizures.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 5063530,
        "hacker": "darkarmani",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 135,
        "comment": "Please let me read your blog page without needed to turn on lots of\njavascript. The page is blank without whitelisting JS content.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 181451,
        "hacker": "jcl",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 136,
        "comment": "I don't know... I think the DS Lite and the Wiimote are approaching Apple's\nlevel of simplicity in design, although they lack the premium in cost.\n\nAs for ugly Apple products, there are probably some out there that qualify\n(mostly non-Jobs stuff)...\n\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_Lisa\n\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macintosh_II_series\n\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EMate_300\n\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twentieth_Anniversary_Macintosh\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.067"
    },
    {
        "id": 691601,
        "hacker": "jcl",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 136,
        "comment": "Note: The closed form solution is given in the article.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 15279829,
        "hacker": "jcl",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 136,
        "comment": "\"Add\" itself is acceptable: \"the desired currency must be added to the\nwallet's balance\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15462688,
        "hacker": "jcl",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 136,
        "comment": "Given the relative size of the function and typical memory, I suspect that the\nissue the author ran into was actually the JVM's 64KB limit on the bytecode\nsize of a compiled function.\n\nhttps://stackoverflow.com/questions/17422480/maximum-size-of...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.056"
    },
    {
        "id": 8465008,
        "hacker": "general_failure",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 137,
        "comment": "Most of these execs are smart enough not to have a disconnect. They know\nexactly how decisions are made and what is going on. These slides are about\nmaking existing googlers feel good about what is happening around them. It\nwould suck for the talent at google to be called a pyramid slave.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.333"
    },
    {
        "id": 6331961,
        "hacker": "general_failure",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 137,
        "comment": "Sorry but it sounds like you are a android noob\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 6164191,
        "hacker": "general_failure",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 137,
        "comment": "Stuck on \"Awaiting network consensus\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15779014,
        "hacker": "jfoutz",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 138,
        "comment": "I mean, it's your source. You're free to disagree with it. the cost per mile\nclearly goes down as milage goes up. as witnessed by the 10/15/20 brackets of\ndriving. but 20 cents a mile isn't even close.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.008"
    },
    {
        "id": 16923300,
        "hacker": "jfoutz",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 138,
        "comment": "I haven't looked at it in a couple of years, but medicare used to publish what\nthey pay, and the random adjustments based on location and other factors i\ndon't recall.\n\nmedicare doesn't negotiate. they just pay a fixed cost up front.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.175"
    },
    {
        "id": 7321643,
        "hacker": "jfoutz",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 138,
        "comment": "this work? http://ccsre.stanford.edu/reports/report_13.pdf\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 17573162,
        "hacker": "drblast",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 139,
        "comment": "Don't even have to imagine.\n\n    \n    \n      NASDAQ: MSFT\n      $104.40\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 1663034,
        "hacker": "drblast",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 139,
        "comment": "I can't understand the motivations for this.\n\nSeveral state attorney generals find out there is are people going to a web\nsite, and for all intents and purposes advertising they are going to commit\ncriminal acts. The public is outraged.\n\nA rational person whose job is to enforce the law at this point would be\ndancing in happy circles, because the criminals are not only advertising their\ncrimes, they're doing it in a single, easily searchable location. This makes\nhis job much easier than it was before.\n\nSo what does this person do in order to score political points with the\noutraged public? Arrest all these people in sting operations? No. He gets the\nsite shut down. Out of sight, out of mind. And the public is _happy_ about\nthat.\n\nFor the life of me I can't understand why people do the things they do and\nfeel justified about it. Prostitution is either so bad that it should be\nillegal and those laws _enforced_ , or it shouldn't be illegal at all because\nall that does is create problems. There is no middle ground here.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.074"
    },
    {
        "id": 2658073,
        "hacker": "drblast",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 139,
        "comment": "The assumption that there's something wrong with not interacting with other\npeople eagerly and often strikes me as oddly egotistical. Other people aren't\nalive solely for the enjoyment of extraverts.\n\nThe \"problem,\" if there is one, is that extraverts are uncomfortable and find\nit difficult to interact with introverts. But this is as much the fault of\nextraverted people as it is of introverted people. They speak a different\nlanguage and need to meet halfway to interact effectively.\n\nDue to the personality type, however, the extraverts see this as a huge\nproblem while the introverts really don't care all that much.\n\nWhat if we asked the obvious counter-question: Why are extraverts so\nthreatened by anyone who won't interact with them on their terms?\n\nNobody asks that because extraverts get a pass on this; it's the introvert's\nfault when social interaction between and extravert and an intravert is\nuncomfortable.\n\nI can see why that would happen but it's odd.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.093"
    },
    {
        "id": 10870231,
        "hacker": "facetube",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 140,
        "comment": "BBC covered a similar situation in Britain. One of the arguments for keeping\nthem running: inactive lines quickly fall in to disrepair (physically or\nlegally/procedurally), which could actually end up costing more, assuming\ndemand is projected to increase and the line would have to be reopened.\n\nhttp://www.bbc.com/future/story/20150723-why-britain-has-sec...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 12942267,
        "hacker": "facetube",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 140,
        "comment": "We need to have a civilized, polite, reasonable, factual discussion about the\nfuture of our country, one that both recognizes the damage caused by social\nbigotry _and_ recognizes the damage caused by economic insecurity and the\noffshoring of the proceeds of Americans' work.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 16958746,
        "hacker": "facetube",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 140,
        "comment": "And that provides a profiling oracle that can be used to determine data about\nindividuals. Once they interact, you know. It's not even difficult to pull\noff.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 18576364,
        "hacker": "PurpleRamen",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 141,
        "comment": "A bit more must still be done. The browser-plugin must find the fields to fill\nwith the data. It must also allow adding new entrys or changing existing\nentrys. Actually finding the correct username-field seems to be slightly more\ncomplex on a bad designed page, because it has no special type like the\npassword-field.\n\nOh, do we know whether it's really just a simple passwordmanager, and not also\nsome autofill-manager, session-restorer, or other security/comfort-snakeoil?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.003"
    },
    {
        "id": 15921669,
        "hacker": "PurpleRamen",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 141,
        "comment": "Actually it's illegal to lock the housedoor, because of emergency situations.\nIn case something happend and the people need to flee, they could be trapped\nin the house.\n\nAlso technically it's not illegal to leave your car door unlocked, Police just\nhandles it that way. The law demands that the car cannot be misused.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 17448446,
        "hacker": "PurpleRamen",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 141,
        "comment": "> When did the most \"fake news\" started appearing?\n\nMust have been when humans started to speak. Fake News is nothing new, just\nthe name is. In the past there were gossip and rumors, sketchy newspapers who\nspreaded whatever sold best, and sometimes even satirical things like Bonsai\nKittens (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonsai_Kitten) in the '90s.\n\nThe only difference today is that people moved from the streets to the net,\nand gossip-snakes have upgraded their game in quality because of modern tools.\nBut whether centralized or decentralized, the game was and will always be\nthere.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.019"
    },
    {
        "id": 5302736,
        "hacker": "niggler",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 142,
        "comment": "\"The original complainant is much more patient than I am. If that's what I'd\ngotten as \"support\" on a paid service when reporting a security breach, I\nwould have closed my account and told them to get fucked.\"\n\nI agree with the end part of your response, but it's unknown if Forrest is a\npaid customer.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.015"
    },
    {
        "id": 5184171,
        "hacker": "niggler",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 142,
        "comment": "I would think a combined validateCardAndCVV (taking both the card number and\nthe CVV) would be the correct approach here ...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 5224070,
        "hacker": "niggler",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 142,
        "comment": "You save up before you start. You shouldn't try to start a business if you\ndon't have a warchest to last you some time.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 5437337,
        "hacker": "niggler",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 142,
        "comment": "Test-first is also broken, because you end up crafting code that suits the\ntest coverage.\n\nhttps://github.com/shtylman/node-int/issues/1#issuecomment-1... is an example\nof an issue which came from an implementation without 100% test coverage. I\nclaim that unless you know every single way in which a function is used, and\neven if you did, you can't design tests to cover 100% of use cases.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.236"
    },
    {
        "id": 15025465,
        "hacker": "digitalzombie",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 143,
        "comment": "Well MongoDB is working with Jepsen...\n\nAfter several Jepsen's article on how bad MongoDB is with the Taylor Swift\nreference.\n\nAlso the notorious wave of MongoDB hacked with terrible security defaults and\nseveral programmers blaming bootcamp coders for terrible set up.\n\nI think MongoDB had to do some damage control and wake up.\n\nThey apparently are working with him now.\n\nQuick google as proof: https://aphyr.com/posts/338-jepsen-mongodb-3-4-0-rc3\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.331"
    },
    {
        "id": 14484180,
        "hacker": "digitalzombie",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 143,
        "comment": "> As automation replaces low-skill jobs, the wage premium may actually\n> skyrocket for those who are able to get a job.\n\nThere was an article recently about automation actually lower the cost.\n\nI had a debate about this with my libertarian friend.\n\nBuddy: \"Automation is a great!\"\n\nI know he's libertarian I was curious if he would support government program\nfor the job that's being displaced. I'm for automation too.\n\nMe: \"So what about the people who are displace?\"\n\nBuddy: Well for the job that left over from automation will go up. So if\nwaiters got displace, the rest of the worker who sill wait table will have\ntheir wages rises.\n\nI didn't have a response to this because I have no idea if it's true or not.\nThen on reddit and hacknews there was an article talking about automation will\ncause wages to go down for the job automation is taken over. As for your\ncomment of either job wages going up or not.\n\nAnyway, it goes on and on until his solution was: family, church, community,\nand he very very reluctantly states government assistance. Also throughout\nsaid talk, he never thought about these people or flesh out a real plan for\nthis.\n\nYour comment reminded me of this conversation.\n\nI'm not entirely sure if you're talking about the people who's getting replace\nor the other job. Either way unskilled workers still need a skill/trade to\neven get a job that's not automated.\n\nIf we're going to automate away all or most of the low skill job then what\nhappen to these unskilled people?\n\nFor the people that are able to land a job, I think it's your speculation, in\nterm of wages will go up.\n\nI think education either college or vocational school or online or whatever is\ngoing to help unskilled labor pool. And how are they even going to even do\nthat given that the job pool for unskilled or low skill labors are going away?\nHow do they train for skill while having no money?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.166"
    },
    {
        "id": 14231438,
        "hacker": "digitalzombie",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 143,
        "comment": "I stumbled across academia.edu trying to grab a syllabus from some university\nto find books to supplement my learning.\n\nIt was so spammy.\n\nI didn't get why the professor website point all his research towards\nacademia.edu.\n\nHe could have posted it on his website or github.\n\nThe website demand from the get go your info and you have to create account to\neven get stuff. It's similar to quora.\n\nQuora survived with its quality like posts/answers but I still disagree with\nthis type of model.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 21071714,
        "hacker": "recursive",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 144,
        "comment": "Here's the last language question I asked on SO:\nhttps://stackoverflow.com/questions/50704766/elementof-can-i...\n\nI got a clear, concise, and correct answer. I've heard a lot of noise about\nthe toxic community on SO, but I never see it whenever I'm there. Or maybe\nit's me. Anyway, SO is a very useful resource for me, even at this late date.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.058"
    },
    {
        "id": 4495625,
        "hacker": "recursive",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 144,
        "comment": "As apparently the lone voice of dissent, I like to say that I find the\nStackOverflow moderation to be helpful and increase the quality of the site. I\nsuppose it's not a coincidence but I don't find it difficult to participate at\nall.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.225"
    },
    {
        "id": 4594178,
        "hacker": "recursive",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 144,
        "comment": "0 days for Opera! woo!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14713133,
        "hacker": "recursive",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 144,
        "comment": "Why would you want to listen to multiple songs simultaneously?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3413725,
        "hacker": "recursive",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 144,
        "comment": "I wasn't there when they installed the scales. I didn't go through a training\nsession where they explained the scales. If, for some reason, I could\nreasonably been expected to know about the scales, I might agree. But I do\nnot. It's like saying you don't know how to speak fluent Italian because you\ndon't pay attention. There was no expressed expectation that you were supposed\nto learn Italian.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 17729034,
        "hacker": "recursive",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 144,
        "comment": "Yes, and when I say 1/3, I mean\n0.3333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333... and so on.\nUnfortunately, I can't tell you exactly, since we're using decimal.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.188"
    },
    {
        "id": 16987895,
        "hacker": "burkaman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 145,
        "comment": "Aside from Patrick Bateman committing gratuitous murders on screen, the major\ndifference is that he hates his life and he never looks like he's having fun.\n\nJordan Belfort might be doing terrible things (although not as bad as serial\nmurder), but he looks and acts like he loves every minute of it. Bateman\ndoesn't.\n\nYou could also compare The Hangover and Leaving Las Vegas. One makes a drug-\nfilled weekend in Vegas look sort of fun, and one does not.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.163"
    },
    {
        "id": 16769088,
        "hacker": "burkaman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 145,
        "comment": "> I don't hear anyone calling for sanctions on Iran\n\nThe US president? Israel? The new US national security adviser to the\npresident? An enormous number of existing sanctions currently imposed by the\nUS, EU, and UN?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.045"
    },
    {
        "id": 12392639,
        "hacker": "burkaman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 145,
        "comment": "No, so I guess I'm asking why you think it distracts from the substance. It\nseems unambiguously clear to me, and I can't immediately think of a way to\ntake offense, especially in this context where the subject is just an abstract\nnon-specific person.\n\nI get that objectification and dehumanization have been and continue to be\nhuge problems, I just don't see an issue here. If you're talking about a\nspecific person, it's weird and possibly offensive, but that's not the case\nhere.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.024"
    },
    {
        "id": 13982271,
        "hacker": "burkaman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 145,
        "comment": "What do you mean? They talk about this stuff all the time.\n\nhttps://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2015/02/fcc-votes-net-neutrali...\n\nhttps://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2016/12/network-neutrality-201...\n\nhttps://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2017/02/congress-contemplating...\n\nhttps://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2014/11/verizon-x-uidh\n\nhttps://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2015/01/verizon-and-turn-break...\n\netc.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.312"
    },
    {
        "id": 14516672,
        "hacker": "burkaman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 145,
        "comment": "Isn't 100% of Wikipedia's money from donations? Maybe they don't need to raise\nmoney every year, but eventually they do need people to donate. MIT doesn't,\nthey have other sources of funding. That was the point of the comparison.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 15737692,
        "hacker": "burkaman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 145,
        "comment": "Laws are limits, not instructions. You shouldn't drive exactly the speed limit\nwhen it's pouring rain.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 19001196,
        "hacker": "paulie_a",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 146,
        "comment": "Do people actually call for recommendations? Hell I just use a coworker I\nworked extensively with. I've been asked to be a recommendation by previous\nco-workers and rarely get a call. It has declined over the past ten years.\nReferences seem to be a dead thing. It's a waste of time. Of course they are\ngoing to be positive. I can't imagine someone would list a reference where\nthey say \"fuck that person\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.069"
    },
    {
        "id": 17561805,
        "hacker": "paulie_a",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 146,
        "comment": "She actually made a referral, then I found out that department wasn't\naccepting new patients... It's been a frustrating process.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.088"
    },
    {
        "id": 17638241,
        "hacker": "paulie_a",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 146,
        "comment": "At one point I was taking 40mg.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18400356,
        "hacker": "paulie_a",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 146,
        "comment": "Unless something has changed more recently Photoshop was terrible with you\nacceleration and worked like crap on a 4k display. Most Adobe products\ncompletely lacked support for 4k and made them unusable. I was dumbfounded you\nhad to manually edit obscure setting files simply to get hit or miss support\nfor a modern display. They are a graphics company.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.062"
    },
    {
        "id": 8012477,
        "hacker": "Someone1234",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 147,
        "comment": "The problem with that concept is: Bad guys steal your domain (e.g. break into\nthe DNS provider and change the A records). They go to Google, request a cert,\nand Google checks the domain for the verification code (like Google Apps).\n\nGoogle generates you a new certificate, you then install the certificate, and\nnow users are even less suspecting that the domain has been compromised. It\neven defeats a Strict Transport Security policy.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.243"
    },
    {
        "id": 8700661,
        "hacker": "Someone1234",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 147,
        "comment": "I like that implementation as I try and avoid Amazon Sellers when I can (and\nhate how Amazon intentionally confuses Amazon direct with Amazon sellers).\n\nI'd definitely prefer, if you want to add Amazon Sellers, a completely\nseparate column rather than conflating it with Amazon direct. The current site\nworks for me.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 8969343,
        "hacker": "Someone1234",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 147,
        "comment": "Devil's advocate but you could push that to Amazon's Glacier storage. Also\nAmazon charge for bandwidth in addition to the storage cost.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9614069,
        "hacker": "Someone1234",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 147,
        "comment": "OSS can just use trademarks to stop SF from redistributing the binaries under\nthat specific name (thus will kill their search rank).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 9765524,
        "hacker": "Someone1234",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 147,
        "comment": "Uhh yes? Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu Plus, and the YouTube app (it is\nChromecast compatible).\n\nWe use it extensively. We've talked about cancelling cable but my wife watches\nthe live sports too much.\n\nPS - We'd also use a HBO Go app if they had one. Currently it is Amazon Fire\nand game console exclusive as far as I know.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.006"
    },
    {
        "id": 10672431,
        "hacker": "Someone1234",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 147,
        "comment": "Are you sure you aren't mis-remembering and were installing the Unix Services\nfor Windows, to utilise Linux-like command line utilities?\n\nAs the person said above, ftp.exe has been in Windows since the MS Dos days,\nand is a core utility. I've never seen it not been available on any version in\nany situation.\n\nNow an FTP server definitely needs to be installed. Always has. But we're\ntalking about the ftp.exe client.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.225"
    },
    {
        "id": 12805472,
        "hacker": "Someone1234",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 147,
        "comment": "When you say \"sexually assault\" are you referring to them grabbing her behind\nor something else? The term is very broadly used.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.060"
    },
    {
        "id": 20412935,
        "hacker": "Someone1234",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 147,
        "comment": "Soda is poison. It might sound dramatic, but I think we'll come to see it as\nsimilar to smoking or heavy alcohol drinking (assuming we aren't there\nalready).\n\nI've been trying to quit for years. I'll likely get mocked, but it is quite\naddictive once you're hooked (particularly as it makes you tired, which makes\nyou want to drink more to feel \"normal\").\n\nI'm trying to move to sweetened Iced Tea (40% less sugar) and eventually\nunsweetened Iced Tea/water. But getting used to less caffeine/sugar actually\ncauses legitimate withdrawal, plus kicking a habit is always tricky.\n\nIt has been linked to cancer (stomach, throat, mouth, the whole digestive\nsystem), diabetes, heart disease, and beyond.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.004"
    },
    {
        "id": 9245520,
        "hacker": "cbd1984",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 148,
        "comment": "So goodbye to accessibility.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10077873,
        "hacker": "cbd1984",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 148,
        "comment": "> the (near dead) chemist\n\nWork around enough H2S and it will take you the rest of the way.\n\nMy point is, it has enough problems with flagrant toxicity that containment of\nnon-trivial amounts of it will be either massively expensive, totally\ninadequate (especially in the event of an earthquake, fire, fire caused by\nearthquake...), or both.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.086"
    },
    {
        "id": 10523187,
        "hacker": "cbd1984",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 148,
        "comment": "> the godless machine age\n\nWhich began in the 1700s or earlier, with the Dark Satanic Mills.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.075"
    },
    {
        "id": 18489557,
        "hacker": "robocat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 149,
        "comment": "Generally I always use Function() instead of eval, because Function doesn't\ncapture the current scope (and also it won't interfere with JIT optimisation,\nand avoids possible memory bloat of variables in closure if you keep\nreferences to the functions).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.017"
    },
    {
        "id": 19977698,
        "hacker": "robocat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 149,
        "comment": "There is plenty of variation within \"old white people\": using blatant\nstereotypes is just plain offensive.\n\n\"All black people are _____\" is equally unacceptable.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.130"
    },
    {
        "id": 15272742,
        "hacker": "robocat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 149,
        "comment": "Ahhh, not the same as the lanes we have that you need to gaze into an obscured\ncamera to pass inwards international border control (must get green light\nbefore gate will let you through).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 7712861,
        "hacker": "robocat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 149,
        "comment": "Or do the opposite and listen to it in an anechoic chamber - which apparently\nis psychologi ally difficult to handle:\n\nhttp://www.ted.com/conversations/14056/why_is_absolute_silen...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 20724806,
        "hacker": "umvi",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 150,
        "comment": "I'm fine with a parser that doesn't get all of the corner cases as long as it\nfails gracefully.\n\nReally, the only time it would matter is if you are parsing user-provided JSON\nand said user was trying to exploit your parser somehow.\n\nBut 99% of the time, I'm not parsing user-provided JSON, so I don't ever\nencounter these corner cases and parsing/serialization works great.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.144"
    },
    {
        "id": 19338609,
        "hacker": "umvi",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 150,
        "comment": "I'm no math expert, but to me the only question that should matter is: how\nrandom is the parity distribution of digits in pi? If the answer is \"perfectly\nrandom\", then that means each digit in pi should have a perfectly random\nparity. If the answer is not \"perfectly random\" then that means you should be\nable to predict the parity of the next digit based on the parity of previous\ndigits with probability >50% in the long run, which I don't think holds true\nfor pi (I could be wrong).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.102"
    },
    {
        "id": 18345929,
        "hacker": "umvi",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 150,
        "comment": "> Intolerance of intolerance is the only acceptable form of intolerance.\n\nSo now the game becomes figuring out how to label what your opponent is doing\nas intolerance so that you can conveniently be intolerant of it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 5147947,
        "hacker": "guard-of-terra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 151,
        "comment": "Maybe Wil Shipley nailed the problem in his \"On Being Crazy\":\nhttp://blog.wilshipley.com/2005/05/on-being-crazy.html\n\nSo, is genius linked with craziness? Is this why we aren't all geniuses? Is\nmankind only so smart because if we get any smarter, we cease to function\ncorrectly? Maybe it's just not evolutionarily advantageous to be smarter than\nwe are; it makes us mopey, and we end up cutting our ears off when we're\ntrying to woo girls, which rarely results in offspring.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.137"
    },
    {
        "id": 5092970,
        "hacker": "guard-of-terra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 151,
        "comment": "Seoul means very much for them. If I understand right, \"Seoul\" is a word for\ncapital.\n\nThey took traditions seriously and traditionally it's THE capital. Even North\nKorea considered Seoul the capital for decades, calling Pyongyang \"the capital\nof revolution\" or something like that.\n\nAlso, it was a very poor and unstable country post-war and didn't feature much\nstrategic thinking. And obviously USA wanted their military bases near the\nborder, i.e. in Seoul.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.012"
    },
    {
        "id": 4013640,
        "hacker": "guard-of-terra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 151,
        "comment": "This is in class; but there is a huge pressure on them to \"study\" after class,\nspending all time on it.\n\nThey because myopic, weaker from vitamin D deficiency and still do not learn\nanything (adult would consider) useful.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.267"
    },
    {
        "id": 3967541,
        "hacker": "guard-of-terra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 151,
        "comment": "It's not a question of essentials. It is a question of are we becoming a\nbetter society by pirating Game of Thrones? Yes we do.\n\nSo you are going to disregard me just like HBO already did. Why should not I?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.183"
    },
    {
        "id": 11768647,
        "hacker": "guard-of-terra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 151,
        "comment": "Singles always arrived in cities from countryside, where they formed families,\nand they could only have multi-gen families after a few generations. By then\nthey had money for maids.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 13610838,
        "hacker": "guard-of-terra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 151,
        "comment": "Saving the world by exploiting Tesla factory workers seems equally impossible.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.667"
    },
    {
        "id": 13646389,
        "hacker": "guard-of-terra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 151,
        "comment": "I really liked throwing frisbee, unfortunately these days I have neither place\nnor company to do this.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 7044173,
        "hacker": "guard-of-terra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 151,
        "comment": "Hong Kong and Singapore are much worse when it comes to feeding themself yet\nthey have no problem doing so. In practice, they are the richest.\n\nRussia has infinite resources of growing food which is only constrained by the\nfact that it's not very profitable. Nobody it the world wants food so badly to\npay for in same kind of money they cough up for oil.\n\nFood is not the constraint, neither is living space.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.057"
    },
    {
        "id": 6233464,
        "hacker": "guard-of-terra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 151,
        "comment": "You can. You can send an IP packed to every host in the internet and hopefully\nrecieve a reply. That us the internet scanning.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18385388,
        "hacker": "petra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 152,
        "comment": "Zen monks usually don't share ideas.\n\nThey try to share experiences, about certain possibilities of the human mind,\nand how they feel.\n\nBut those are weird, complex, possibly frightening, and they are also\nsometimes mis-communicated[1]. Also - they challenge deeply held personal\nbeliefs.\n\nSo it's natural that people will resist.\n\n[1]The nature of enlightenment was always hard to explain. Until you listen to\nGary Weber(http://happiness-beyond-thought.com/):\n\nHe explains it simply - you know that internal voice, that's always focused\nabout \"I\"? and always remembering the past and making-plans/dreaming about the\nfuture ?\n\nThink about a time you'd had less of that ? so it's possible to make this\nvoice disappear.\n\nAnd than - you think when you want to think, when you need ideas they\nsometimes pop into you head, like regular creativity , but most of the time -\npeace.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.080"
    },
    {
        "id": 16419038,
        "hacker": "petra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 152,
        "comment": "What will.the shift be to ?\n\nA few possibilities, at least short term:\n\nSome manufacturing returns to the US with help of robots. Maybe even as an\nexportible industry.\n\nMaybe it's possible to simplify those complex jobs that more people could do\nthem?\n\nIt's possible for the some of the new,highly automated industries to be a net\njob creator. For example one scenario for self-driving is that it will be\npartly remotely-operated ,i.e. jobs , instead of people driving themselves.\n\nThings may become cheaper and people will spend the money left on human based\nexperiences/services ? Or even an whole economy based on human interaction\nbecause that's the one thing robots couldn't do?\n\nOr like we always did , we'll find some useless thing(like consumerism) that\nwill create jobs and build society around it ?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.046"
    },
    {
        "id": 14576944,
        "hacker": "petra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 152,
        "comment": "Walmart is working hard to winning pickup retail and already offering it in\n900 stores. All they are missing is the delivery guy, and since instacart\ndelivers using the UBER model, that isn't terribly hard, and even today they\noffer that via UBER. Instacrt can't offer them much.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.017"
    },
    {
        "id": 10862356,
        "hacker": "petra",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 152,
        "comment": "I agree the evidence do not strictly prove that , but at least, in general ,\nfrom all we know about indigenous populations , we have good evidence on how\none type of society that's conductive to mental health should roughly look\nlike.\n\nAnd yes, even if mental illness is rooted in biology , we know that some\nenvironments cause it to manifest and some environments don't , and since we\ncannot change biology (and drugs are a very poor solution to such problems )\nthis means , at least that a big part of the solution is environmental change.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.067"
    },
    {
        "id": 1979513,
        "hacker": "buster",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 153,
        "comment": "Would it be possible to \"fork\" Java? Alternatives could probably be Parrot or\nLLVM?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 1274642,
        "hacker": "buster",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 153,
        "comment": "You probably had no experience, the wrong tools and thus a negative\nexperience.\n\nDo you have specific things in mind?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.267"
    },
    {
        "id": 6358965,
        "hacker": "buster",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 153,
        "comment": "Apparently there are none, but there are rules followed by some papers..\n\nhttp://grammar.about.com/od/rs/g/Sentence-Case.htm\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 5427948,
        "hacker": "buster",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 153,
        "comment": "Yes, and i should trust in that source? haha, of course! The point is that the\nwhole conglomerate of companies is enough power to prevent competition and\ninnovation (from the outside), to dictate prices, to dominate a whole market\nwith whatever fits your companies strategy best. This constellation has never\nbeen good for the consumer. Nobody guarantees you that they're holding back\nwith the fees until they can establish h.265 as the new defacto standard and\nthen start raising fees, because eventually we'll have the same situation\nagain as nowadays (hard decoders only support h264/265, etc etc). Again, there\nwill be no competition, in a few years every video conference will be h264/5,\nevery web video wil be h264, every Bluray, virtually every video.. If you have\nthat kind of dominance you can do whatever the fuck you like. Like raising the\nfees and leeching the money out of companies because there is no choice.\nAtleast that's what i would do ;)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.144"
    },
    {
        "id": 2920922,
        "hacker": "buster",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 153,
        "comment": "I don't think any phone will get 3.0 because this is the \"tablet version\"..\n4.0 (or what icecream sandwich will be) will be the united 2.3 and 3.x\nbranches. You'll have to wait a little longer, although Icecream Sandwich will\nbe released soon\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.188"
    },
    {
        "id": 14446684,
        "hacker": "Spivak",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 154,
        "comment": "Potentially, but if challenged the courts would see right past a company\ntaking away customer rights by shifting words around and rule that such an\nindefinite lease was ownership.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.009"
    },
    {
        "id": 21550896,
        "hacker": "Spivak",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 154,
        "comment": "I feel like that’s being super rude to the devs at Oracle that have been\nconstantly innovating and improving the language. Java has changed a lot in\nthe last 9 years.\n\nOracle’s upcoming design of continuations I think is genuinely novel and will\ninspire a lot of other languages’ implementations.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.051"
    },
    {
        "id": 21443126,
        "hacker": "Spivak",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 154,
        "comment": "But it's not shady at all. Like these bike companies track the location of the\nbikes with GPS. Any when you go for a ride on one you are by proxy being\ntracked with GPS. Like this isn't magic or unexpected. Are you mad that an\nairlines have your location information while you're on the plane? Are you\ngonna demand the FAA stop tracking flights for rider privacy?\n\nBut nobody actually getting the blame since it would be weird if anyone was\nactually mad at this. Does anyone seriously believe that using Find My iPhone\ndoesn't allow Apple access to your phone's location _for the purposes of\nshowing you where it is_?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.170"
    },
    {
        "id": 20280739,
        "hacker": "Spivak",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 154,
        "comment": "TBF sales tools probably come under the most scrutiny at just about every\ncompany for price/value. Companies that sell tools to sales can get high\nmargins but can't price themselves above their value.\n\nWhat a weird sentence to write but at least in my experience with\nIT/engineering so much stuff ends up being bought that, although it's is\nusually nice, would never stand up to scrutiny if we had to justify business\nvalue.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.094"
    },
    {
        "id": 17810180,
        "hacker": "Spivak",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 154,
        "comment": "Which is something that people complain about, but isn't enough of a motivator\nto get anyone to switch. Skype for Business fits the bill of a lean messaging\nplatform with similar features but it's just terrible. Mattermost is pretty\ncool but it's self-hosted which makes it a non-starter in shops that don't\nhave IT staff. And all the other competing products are basically just Slack\nclones with less features.\n\nSo Slack is going to continue eating all your resources, because anyone who\ncares will switch to a leaner Slack client before they switch away from Slack.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.099"
    },
    {
        "id": 17366951,
        "hacker": "Spivak",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 154,
        "comment": "I mean even if we lived under a monarchy we would still be one country, the\ntwo things aren't really related.\n\nThat is the worst possible reason to enact a law. It should be obvious why\nmaking people's lives worse purposefully for political posturing is a bad\nidea, _and_ you run the risk of your plan backfiring and having to live\nforever in the now-worse world.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.253"
    },
    {
        "id": 15254308,
        "hacker": "Spivak",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 154,
        "comment": "Sure, but even the QA is basically a post/comment system adapted to solve a\ndifferent problem. It's not so weird to take the lessons learned there and\napply it back to general comment systems.\n\n\\- A reputation scheme for both posters and commenters.\n\n\\- Pinned responses from the poster.\n\n\\- The comments appear in a 'best' ordering.\n\n\\- Bad comments get pushed down and hidden.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.003"
    },
    {
        "id": 1023442,
        "hacker": "pmorici",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 155,
        "comment": "3 wrong guesses and you are banned for 3 months.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 18324260,
        "hacker": "pmorici",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 155,
        "comment": "I wonder if they are working with Coinbase behind the scenes on this or if\nthis is a totally independent product. They have a partnership with Coinbase\nthat lets you view your Coinbase balances from your account page on Fidelity.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 18949652,
        "hacker": "pmorici",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 155,
        "comment": "Perhaps but you can do the same with BGAN, iDirect, or Kymeta Kyway with\nbetter bandwidth this just seems like it has no competitive advantage over\ncompetitors except perhaps coverage at the poles.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 15268196,
        "hacker": "pmorici",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 155,
        "comment": "Do you have any stats on the percentage of traditional financial crimes that\ngo unsolved vs the percentage of crypto-currency crimes that go unsolved? You\nwould have a hard time finding a major crypto-currency heist, dark market, or\nrogue exchange that hasn't been tracked down and shut down.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.099"
    },
    {
        "id": 7340528,
        "hacker": "pmorici",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 155,
        "comment": "\"Regulating them ensures that they are available where and when they are\nexpected to be.\"\n\nDo you actually believe that? Because I don't see how it could possibly be\ntrue. Uber does a better job of providing cars when and where they're needed\nthan any other cab company I've ever seen. Not only to they make it easy for\ndrivers to work part time to accommodate higher demand during peak hours they\nalso provide service to areas of cites where taxi drivers flat out refuse to\ngo despite their supposed regulated status to provide service to all parts of\nthe city. I've talked to people who use Uber in Baltimore about it for example\nand before Uber they would routinely be stranded in bad parts of town or off\nthe beaten path areas and the taxi dispatcher would literally laugh at them if\nthey called for a pickup.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.107"
    },
    {
        "id": 5555637,
        "hacker": "pmorici",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 155,
        "comment": "Every place is different but in some places there are _huge_ advantages to\nbuying that most people don't probably realize.\n\nIn the state of Maryland for example It's my understanding that property taxes\non the first $300k of assessed value for primary residences are adjusted based\non your income[0] for households making less than $60k per year. (for\nreference 300k will get you a pretty nice place in a trendy part of the city)\nThe end result is you could be living in a $300k house and pay zero or near\nzero property tax. So you could for example buy a place straight out of\ncollege rent out the spare rooms to pay off the mortgage at a very accelerated\npace and then if you wanted to you could live in that house basically property\ntax free once the mortgage is paid off so long as you didn't make too much\nmoney. I'm not sure if you've looked at your living cost structure but once\nyou knock out mortgage and property tax you have an extreme amount of\nflexibility in terms of how much money you need to make to live comfortably\nand the types of career risks you could take w/o having to worry about ending\nup on the street. You have to be smart about what you buy and at what price of\ncourse which is where most people fail at smart decisions when home buying but\nif you do it right it really can be a no brainier.\n\n[0] http://www.dat.state.md.us/sdatweb/htc.html\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.196"
    },
    {
        "id": 4493607,
        "hacker": "pmorici",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 155,
        "comment": "Protecting the interests of the chemical manufacturing industry?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 1754145,
        "hacker": "pmorici",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 155,
        "comment": "I always say \"Computer Scientist\", I also think the term engineer is alright.\nI hate any phrasing that uses the word \"programmer\" because that is generally\nused to describe jobs involving wrangling Excel spreadsheets programming Word\nmacros and other low rent IT jobs.\n\nOf course I've read before that by time you get around to the topic of what\nyou do for a living you should have so captured your audiences attention that\nyou could say janitor and they wouldn't care.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.219"
    },
    {
        "id": 1061111,
        "hacker": "pmorici",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 155,
        "comment": "\"our governments have an obligation to investigate each and every threat\nthat's made, even jokingly on Twitter.\"\n\nNo they don't. They have an obligation to investigate legitimate things.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14940455,
        "hacker": "manarth",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 156,
        "comment": "\n    \n    \n      \"You’ll find me sitting in the middle seat, all the way in the back,\n      next to the toilets, but smiling the whole way because that seat was\n      ridiciculously cheap or even free!\"\n    \n\nIt's the premise for the travel blog. The author describes it as \"the worst\npossible seat in economy class\", but at least it's cheap!\n\nhttp://www.seat31b.com/why-another-travel-blog/\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.030"
    },
    {
        "id": 9642304,
        "hacker": "manarth",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 156,
        "comment": "You just have to look at Therac 25 for the risks of relying on software\ninterlocks alone. One of the prevailing pieces of feedback was the lack of\n_hardware_ interlocks - whether that's possible on anesthesia machines I don't\nknow…but the prevailing wisdom is to use/include hardware interlocks wherever\nthat's feasible, for any critical life-supporting equipment.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14319829,
        "hacker": "manarth",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 156,
        "comment": "\n    \n    \n      It may seem unfair to take $140 million and build a $10 million game\n    \n\nIf a film spent $10M, and turned $140M at the box office, it would be seen as\na success, rather than a con. Should a game be any different?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.183"
    },
    {
        "id": 4154017,
        "hacker": "radley",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 157,
        "comment": "As a life-long Mac user and Android UI dev there seems to be a distinct\npattern forming:\n\n1\\. Revolutionary services start on iOS.\n\n2\\. Innovations on common mobile services start on Android and get \"finished\"\nlater by Apple.\n\nThere's plenty evidence to support this - almost all _new_ stuff announced by\nApple in the last two WWDC were things already done on Android. But they were\nall unfinished ideas. Apple recognized the usefulness and completed them.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.027"
    },
    {
        "id": 7273798,
        "hacker": "radley",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 157,
        "comment": "Isn't the next _win_ turning your house / apartment into a game world /\nholodeck using something like this together with an Oculus Rift?\n\nHousehold layout and furniture are mapped out, then re-textured to represent a\ncastle, evil lair, enemy corporation, etc. Textures can update allowing the\nstory to reuse each room as different places as you progress - the same way\nthe holodeck area is actually small but uses optical illusions to give you a\nsense of greater mobility.\n\nNot saying we have holodeck. But it's a step towards.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.044"
    },
    {
        "id": 668417,
        "hacker": "radley",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 157,
        "comment": "Sorry, I disagree. It's disrespectful to both parties (applicant and\nreference). Sounds like a tool.\n\nIf I were to receive this kind of call, I'd contact the applicant and ask WTF\nwas going on.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 16203415,
        "hacker": "mar77i",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 158,
        "comment": "Whatabautism\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 21134569,
        "hacker": "mar77i",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 158,
        "comment": "As far as universities do these things publicly, this is inadvertently going\nto tip the scales in who is going to apply. And I'm nowhere seeing an\nuniversity that is actively filtering for opinion-conciousness in this sense,\nthat might actually not be that bad of an idea.\n\nThen again, if they test for both things, how are they supposed to not\nprioritize one over another?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.147"
    },
    {
        "id": 17172114,
        "hacker": "mar77i",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 158,
        "comment": "15 pin analogue? Luxury. I had to manually wire a piece of wire to a microchip\nto attach a joystick made of dinosaur bone.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6380188,
        "hacker": "vibrolax",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 159,
        "comment": "Sidney Harman, who died in 2011, gave his name and talents to a golden age\nconsumer/professional audio company. Today Harman International is a holding\ncompany for many well-known audio industry brands. I think he is much better\nknown for his financial, philanthropic, and political activities than his\ntechnical legacy.\n\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Sidney_Harman\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.186"
    },
    {
        "id": 18117700,
        "hacker": "vibrolax",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 159,
        "comment": "You can't claim to have invented the oscillator, but you can claim the novel\nuse of an oscillator for a particular application.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 16608712,
        "hacker": "vibrolax",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 159,
        "comment": "If you visit Tokyo again, you can buy fake food samples in a number of shops\non Kappabashi street. https://www.japan-guide.com/e/e3020.html\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 12013755,
        "hacker": "pmarreck",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 160,
        "comment": "> A year ago, I saw a Dateline NBC episode about an Iraq-war vet, Sgt. Ray\n> Jennings, who allegedly killed an 18-year-old girl in a parking lot. The\n> evidence didn't persuade me, so my dad and I started our own investigation.\n\nYou're amazing!\n\nI donate to The Innocence Project, because I think putting innocent people\ninto jail is just about the worst thing you can do to someone short of\nrape/kill them.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.079"
    },
    {
        "id": 11074696,
        "hacker": "pmarreck",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 160,
        "comment": "Unfortunately, email format validation (similar to HTML email) is somewhat of\na black art:\n\nhttp://haacked.com/archive/2007/08/21/i-knew-how-to-validate...\n\nhttp://girders.org/blog/2013/01/31/dont-rfc-validate-email-a...\n\nOf course one could always just go with RFC822 and this little regex:\n\nhttp://www.ex-parrot.com/pdw/Mail-RFC822-Address.html\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.214"
    },
    {
        "id": 12611567,
        "hacker": "pmarreck",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 160,
        "comment": "I was disappointed to learn that Quicksort implemented functionally is almost\nalways much much slower than if implemented procedurally, to the point that\nfunctional langs use other sorts such as mergesort. What makes it extra\nannoying is that Quicksort implemented functionally is so damn elegant!\n\nhttp://stackoverflow.com/questions/7717691/why-is-the-minima...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.121"
    },
    {
        "id": 17421098,
        "hacker": "pmarreck",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 160,
        "comment": "In this day and age, apparently!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.062"
    },
    {
        "id": 13396297,
        "hacker": "epistasis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 161,
        "comment": "There's a difference between what all these people are warning of, and then\n\"literally Hitler\" of starting a world war and imprisoning all political\nopponents and then executing millions of the prisoners like cattle in an\nindustrial processing plant.\n\nThe \"literally Hitler\" smear is an attempt to distinguish that careful, and\nimportant distinction, so that the entire thought can be dismissed as\nridiculous.\n\nLooking at each of those articles where they say \"not hitler, but he still is\nmaking noises like he'll be bad,\" do you think that needs to be walked back?\nWere they ignoring reality, or facing an unpleasant reality?\n\n\"Literally Hitler\" is not a thoughtful, fair, or even useful characterization\nof these viewpoints.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.049"
    },
    {
        "id": 7758016,
        "hacker": "epistasis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 161,
        "comment": "I believe that to be an eminently reasonable interpretation of the history and\ncurrent situation.\n\nWhat was the history that led to a the non-common carrier ruling? Was it\nthought that cable companies would upgrade infrastructure more quickly if they\ndidn't have to sell access to their lines?\n\nHere's what the NCTA has to say about it now:\nhttps://www.ncta.com/platform/public-policy/why-its-a-good-t... Given the\nsuccess of broadband in areas where the lines are sold like they would be in a\ncommon carrier situation, it's hard to believe anything they say.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.106"
    },
    {
        "id": 16155786,
        "hacker": "epistasis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 161,
        "comment": "Oh man, Android does that too? This awful, terrible, no good fake \"AI\"\nbehavior on iOS was one of the many quality issues with modern iOS that was\nmaking Android look more attractive.\n\niOS keyboards have been getting worse with every update, probably as more and\nmore engineers feel the need to make a mark, or are required to fix bugs, and\nthey spoil it. The simple and predictable statistical model of the original\niOS was better than what we have now. So much of iOS was better back then,\nIMHO.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.062"
    },
    {
        "id": 19256099,
        "hacker": "epistasis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 161,
        "comment": "What do you mean by being cautious? Wouldn't being cautious mean not including\nun-used libraries with vulnerabilities in them?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.312"
    },
    {
        "id": 19437851,
        "hacker": "MarkMc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 162,
        "comment": "I'm so glad I was taught Java at Macquarie University back in 1998. For the\npast 20 years I've had a career built on a solid API that doesn't change every\n2 years like some flavour-of-the-month Javascript framework.\n\nEven on the client where Java has lost to Javascript, I'm finding it more\nenjoyable to add features to my 15-year-old SWT app [0] rather than dealing\nwith the multiple layers of abstractions that is Javascript+CSS+DOM (+ maybe\nElectron). Personally I think it's a shame Sun dropped the ball with client\nJava - if they had chosen SWT over Swing and provided a minimal JVM then maybe\nJava Web Start would have beaten Javascript web apps. It's also a shame Sun\nsold Java to Oracle - Google would have been a better steward, and probably\nwould have been willing to pay more for the Java parts of Sun.\n\nI'm now trying Dart to develop a few Flutter apps. It's no doubt a better\nlanguage, but not _that much_ better - I think Flutter would have been more\nsuccessful if it was built on Java.\n\n[0] https://www.solaraccounts.co.uk\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.262"
    },
    {
        "id": 9149325,
        "hacker": "MarkMc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 162,
        "comment": "Actually there _is_ something wrong with the concept of families - it's unfair\nthat some children do not get the same level of love and attention (and\ndentist visits) you provide for your children. However, families are not\nobsolete because there's no obvious solution to the problem of unfairness\nbetween families, and given human nature perhaps there will never be a\nsolution.\n\nBut outside the family there _is_ a solution: Just treat everyone equally.\nThere's no biological reason why I should care about the passport of a man I\nhave never met, any more than I should care about his race or tribe or\nreligion.\n\nYes, mass immigration would mean that you would be worse off and the\nimmigrants better off (although spreading the immigration period over say 50\nyears might limit your costs in this equation). But isn't that the right thing\nto do? Do those people deserve to live in absolute poverty? If not, doesn't\nthat mean you have an obligation to help?\n\nNationality is not yet an obsolete concept, but society is slowly moving in\nthat direction. I think Charles Darwin said it best:\n\n\"As man advances in civilisation, and small tribes are united into larger\ncommunities, the simplest reason would tell each individual that he ought to\nextend his social instincts and sympathies to all the members of the same\nnation, though personally unknown to him. This point being once reached, there\nis only an artificial barrier to prevent his sympathies extending to the men\nof all nations and races.\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.004"
    },
    {
        "id": 17400255,
        "hacker": "MarkMc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 162,
        "comment": "Isn't it illegal in the US to offer internships based on race or gender?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 13574670,
        "hacker": "MarkMc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 162,
        "comment": "Wow, that's basically a 5-year loan. I'm surprised that Canadian home buyers\naccept such risk. I wonder why the mortgage market in Australia and UK is so\ndifferent to Canada.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 1564149,
        "hacker": "famousactress",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 163,
        "comment": "There totally are, and while it seems like a good idea to be versed in web\ndevelopment there are still plenty of industries hiring folks to develop\nsoftware very removed from the internet.. For instance, in my town (San\nDiego), there's a ton of embedded firmware positions that usual require solid\nCS fundamentals and experience with C.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.130"
    },
    {
        "id": 2686635,
        "hacker": "famousactress",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 163,
        "comment": "....aaaaand, didn't read it. Why? Cause I was confronted by a stupid countdown\nadvert. At least when it's a movie or a tv show I file a \"remember to go steal\nthat\" ticket in my brain.. but in the case of a magazine article, I'm\ncertainly not gonna go torrent the thing. Just stupid.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.502"
    },
    {
        "id": 10681831,
        "hacker": "famousactress",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 163,
        "comment": " _\" The first character in the instructions has position 1, the second\ncharacter has position 2\"_\n\nThis project seems awesome but playful -1 for non-zero-based-indexing :)\n\n[Edit:]\n\nanother note (obviously I'm hooked).. This instruction isn't 100% parseable.\nIt's not clear whether the desire is for three unique vowels need to appear or\nif three positions in the string need to be vowels. For instance, would 'aaa'\nqualify?\n\n\"It contains at least three vowels (aeiou only), like aei, xazegov, or\naeiouaeiouaeiou\"\n\n[Edit Again: Nevermind... the test example 'aaa' clears it up]\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.228"
    },
    {
        "id": 18083278,
        "hacker": "the_duke",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 164,
        "comment": "I don't know anyone who considers Go a systems language. That wording was also\nremoved from the Go website a long time ago.\n\nThe GC and the heavy weight runtime make it unsuitable in this space.\n\nSkip seems very similar to Swift and Java, with inspiration from Rust wrt\nmutability.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 20520907,
        "hacker": "the_duke",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 164,
        "comment": "0.6% of the growth rate, which is very different from 0.6% of GDP...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12756233,
        "hacker": "the_duke",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 164,
        "comment": "Seems to be fixed by this commit (in 4.8.3).\n\ncommit 89eeba1594ac641a30b91942961e80fae978f839 Author: Linus Torvalds\n<torvalds@linux-foundation.org> Date: Thu Oct 13 13:07:36 2016 -0700\n\n    \n    \n        mm: remove gup_flags FOLL_WRITE games from __get_user_pages()\n        \n        commit 19be0eaffa3ac7d8eb6784ad9bdbc7d67ed8e619 upstream.\n        \n        This is an ancient bug that was actually attempted to be fixed once\n        (badly) by me eleven years ago in commit 4ceb5db9757a (\"Fix\n        get_user_pages() race for write access\") but that was then undone due to\n        problems on s390 by commit f33ea7f404e5 (\"fix get_user_pages bug\").\n        \n        In the meantime, the s390 situation has long been fixed, and we can now\n        fix it by checking the pte_dirty() bit properly (and do it better).  The\n        s390 dirty bit was implemented in abf09bed3cce (\"s390/mm: implement\n        software dirty bits\") which made it into v3.9.  Earlier kernels will\n        have to look at the page state itself.\n        \n        Also, the VM has become more scalable, and what used a purely\n        theoretical race back then has become easier to trigger.\n        \n        To fix it, we introduce a new internal FOLL_COW flag to mark the \"yes,\n        we already did a COW\" rather than play racy games with FOLL_WRITE that\n        is very fundamental, and then use the pte dirty flag to validate that\n        the FOLL_COW flag is still valid.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.059"
    },
    {
        "id": 8619103,
        "hacker": "DrJokepu",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 165,
        "comment": "Actually, the reason Apple sponsored Clang/LLVM is because Apple engineers\nwere unhappy with GCC's build times[1]. If you need to rebuild an entire\noperating system (kernel and userland) every day, your C compiler's build\nperformance matters a lot.\n\n[1] http://www.imore.com/debug-48-melton-ganatra-episode-ii-unde...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 799736,
        "hacker": "DrJokepu",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 165,
        "comment": "I agree with you in that correlation is not causation but I think you're\novercomplicating things a bit in your example; birds don't have a healthcare\nsystem, they're either completely healthy and fit or get killed by a predator\nor by their inability to migrate or some other external factor relatively\nquickly.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.151"
    },
    {
        "id": 4529948,
        "hacker": "DrJokepu",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 165,
        "comment": "This is a horribly naive theory (I have no idea what I'm talking about) but if\nyou have foreign keys you need to get those indexed anyway (otherwise inserts\nor updates will need to do a sequential scan), and with index-only scans, if\nthe referenced key exists in the index, the tuple won't have to be visited,\nhence inserts and updates getting faster in tables with foreign keys?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.138"
    },
    {
        "id": 12494178,
        "hacker": "DrJokepu",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 165,
        "comment": "https://github.com/apple/swift\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4978233,
        "hacker": "betterunix",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 166,
        "comment": "There are already proposals to castrate (chemically or even surgically) sex\noffenders. It was not all that long ago that lobotomy was common practice, and\nit was applied to prisoners.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.175"
    },
    {
        "id": 6553809,
        "hacker": "betterunix",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 166,
        "comment": "It is not about _saving_ it is about _spending_. You need to buy certain\nthings in life, like food. You need to pay taxes if you do not want to be\nthrown in prison. You need to do business with people who need to buy things;\nbarter will only get you so far.\n\nSo sure, you can have your offshore savings in whatever currency you want, but\nat some point you need to spend that money locally. Bitcoin does not avoid\nthis in any way; it actually adds an additional step to transactions, since\nyou need to convert Bitcoin into your local currency (even businesses that\n\"accept Bitcoin\" usually accept payments through services that exchange\nBitcoin for some fiat currency for a small fee). You might dream of a world\nwhere Bitcoin never needs to be exchanged, but that is not going to happen\nuntil governments start accepting Bitcoin payments for tax purposes (and why\nwould any government do that?).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.035"
    },
    {
        "id": 5576866,
        "hacker": "betterunix",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 166,
        "comment": "And it comes with a convenient LED to alert everyone that it is recording,\nwhich is not covert by an definition.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 5580716,
        "hacker": "dottrap",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 167,
        "comment": "Not disputing understaffed possibly being true, and not arguing with you guys,\nbut it's a poor excuse for Microsoft being one of the richest, most powerful\ncompanies in the world, while willing and continuing to lose billions on\nthings like Bing, Xbox (it's true, they still haven't broken even if you count\nall they spent plus the red-ring-of-death write-offs), Zune, and now their\nmobile initiatives.\n\nAnd what was Microsoft doing in those 12 years between C99 and C11? What are\nthey doing so inefficiently in their design that they can't figure out how to\nimplement C when every other C++ compiler team has? Come on, Clang didn't even\nexist until 6 years ago.\n\nStupid positions Microsoft takes like this with regards to C99 and C11 only\nunderscore how pathetic, short sighted, and clueless they have been for over a\ndecade. They have needlessly alienated developers they profess they need so\nmuch for so little reason. How ironic that now they are begging developers to\ndo Windows RT and are promoting \"going native\".\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.074"
    },
    {
        "id": 9953131,
        "hacker": "dottrap",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 167,
        "comment": "In practice with Lua, being dynamically typed isn't really the metric we're\nconcerned about for power consumption. Typically Lua is used as a scripting\ninterface to native APIs and hardware (via C). This is where most of your\npower consumption is going to live. Powering up a wi-fi antenna? That's going\nto cost way more than anything you can measure in Lua. Writing a video game?\nYour GPU is consuming most of the power.\n\nAnd Lua has proven itself in limited/constrained resource environments for\nover 20 years. In practice, it is really good in this space.\n\nAnd a further interesting point about Lua somebody pointed out to me...now\nthat most modern architectures are cache oriented and memory buses are often\nthe bottleneck, it is amazing that Lua is small enough to fit in the L2 cache.\nThink about this...it is almost like having Lua in hardware on the chip.\n\nNote: Canonical PUC-Rio Lua does not have JIT. You aren't burning all the\ncycles you think you are if you are applying typical arguments about the JVM\nor JavaScript JITs.\n\nEdit: typo\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.221"
    },
    {
        "id": 6005385,
        "hacker": "dottrap",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 167,
        "comment": "Every single one of those is an acronym. Why are they so obsessed with\nacronyms?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.286"
    },
    {
        "id": 4447191,
        "hacker": "batgaijin",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 168,
        "comment": "Note to self: never edit a medical article drunk again.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 4557920,
        "hacker": "batgaijin",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 168,
        "comment": "Hey, it's only been 17 years.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4605231,
        "hacker": "batgaijin",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 168,
        "comment": "Here are the facts:\n\nThis is from Wikipedia on demographics of the poor in the USA: The US Census\ndeclared that in 2010 15.1% of the general population lived in poverty:[30]\n9.9% of all non-Hispanic white persons 12.1% of all Asian persons 26.6% of all\nHispanic persons (of any race) 27.4% of all black persons.\n\nLooks pretty bad for hispanics/black people, right?\n\nExcept it doesn't have the population breakdown...\n\nWhite Americans (non-Hispanic/Latino and Hispanic/Latino) are the racial\nmajority, with an 72% share of the U.S. population, per 2010 US Census.[6]\nHispanic and Latino Americans compose 15% of the population, making up the\nlargest ethnic minority.[5] Black Americans are the largest racial minority,\ncomposing nearly 13% of the population.\n\nso here are some facts: .72 * 308 mil * .099 = 21.95 million white people .15\n* 308 mil * .266 = 12.28 million hispanic people .12 * 308 mil * .274 = 10.97\nmillion black people\n\nBasically, what I'm trying to say is this: poor people get fucked in this\ncountry. They really do. When it happens to black people/hispanics, stupid\nhippies love to claim it's racism. Maybe, maybe it is a bit. But I don't think\nso. I think that poor people get fucked in this country with no social welfare\nnet, poor infrastructure, and by making it illegal to take your kid to the\nrich public school.\n\nA lot of black people and hispanics have pretty terrible options in life, but\ngoddamn it, it's not racism. It's not white frat kids saying nigger. It's that\nthey are poor. And there are a lot of white people in the same boat.\n\nRacism is the false flag of socioeconomic problems in society.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.155"
    },
    {
        "id": 4337842,
        "hacker": "batgaijin",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 168,
        "comment": "Hmm, I recently decided to get into the webapp/js stuff and decided to start\nwith Ember, but the lack of documentation was too much for me. Now I'm\nlearning angular and I love it.\n\nCould you elucidate more on your decision? Specifically, was anything harder\nin angular/easier in ember?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.220"
    },
    {
        "id": 320815,
        "hacker": "TrevorJ",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 169,
        "comment": "I've been a big fan of Evernote since beta. The only thing I was disappointed\nwith was that the OCR didn't seem to work very well.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.138"
    },
    {
        "id": 164332,
        "hacker": "TrevorJ",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 169,
        "comment": "It's more about format than camera per se. 35mm film is expensive to work\nwith.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 203600,
        "hacker": "TrevorJ",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 169,
        "comment": "If I cared about this \"news\" I'd be following him on Twitter.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11880339,
        "hacker": "golergka",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 170,
        "comment": "But in #1 you're not working with SQL, you're working with a layer above it.\n\nAnd wouldn't even the most basic data, properly normalized, require joins? I\nmean - learning about database normalization is one of the first things you're\nsupposed to do when you work with relational databases, right?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.103"
    },
    {
        "id": 21512862,
        "hacker": "golergka",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 170,
        "comment": "> Avoidance tactics are usually about emotional reactions.\n\nSometimes it's not really tactics, it's often just a complete mental\nbreakdown. I have founded a startup when I was 22, and completely not ready\nfor something that would be so emotionally hard; it ended up in a a few months\nlong depressive episode, during which I completely ghosted almost every person\nI knew.\n\nSuffice to say, being emotionally and psychologically stable is one of the\nmain traits for a CEO, and avoidance is often a very good \"smell\" of problems\nin that department.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.013"
    },
    {
        "id": 9973869,
        "hacker": "golergka",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 170,
        "comment": "Never play music or sound on load. Even if it's your page only purpose, put on\na simple \"play\" button in the middle of the screen, and start playback after\nuser clicks it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 10685842,
        "hacker": "golergka",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 170,
        "comment": "But this is not Photoshop-to-code problem. I thank the gods I have little to\ndo with web and javascript almost every time I read something about that\nfield.\n\nThis is Photoshop-to-another-designer-friendly-WYSIWYG-tool problem.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.188"
    },
    {
        "id": 12996322,
        "hacker": "golergka",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 170,
        "comment": "May be they just wouldn't need FTL travel because sublight travel is fast\nenough for their perception of time and life expectancy.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 13529870,
        "hacker": "golergka",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 170,
        "comment": "Why would you feel bad for a man selling you bad and overpriced service and\ndemanding a weird monopoly on it anyway?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.633"
    },
    {
        "id": 16307507,
        "hacker": "golergka",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 170,
        "comment": "Chats. Most of my friends and me have most of our social interactions in\nprivate chat groups, with silly pictures and pictures, personal stories and\ndrama happening all the time.\n\nI've tried most of the big ones (except WeChat and other chinese apps, where I\ndon't have a single peer), and I bet on Telegram. They're moving forward with\nincredible speed, and from all the competitors, they seem to understand their\naudience and usage patterns best.\n\nAlso, it's a platform that's already actively used for commerce. Just like\nwith Bitcoin and darknet, drugs are the primary growth factor (I don't know of\nany other transactions cryptocurrency is actually used as currency). I expect\nthat after they release their own currency, it will take over all existing\ncrypto from sheer convenience.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.183"
    },
    {
        "id": 20977661,
        "hacker": "PascLeRasc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 171,
        "comment": "I also prefer toe clips alone, but a big part of why is that it forces you to\npush from around the ball of the foot instead of the arch/middle, and there's\npractically nothing to think about like with clipless. I was in Amsterdam a\nfew weeks ago and rented bikes with my family - we all had sore arches after\nriding around 10 miles because without thinking that's what you naturally do.\nI ride pretty often and since I started using toe clips for every commute and\nclipless for every weekend training ride I've never had any foot discomfort.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.037"
    },
    {
        "id": 13542102,
        "hacker": "PascLeRasc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 171,
        "comment": "If you're still willing to answer questions, what do you do with all the\nfailed drives?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 18420069,
        "hacker": "PascLeRasc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 171,
        "comment": "iFixit reports that it has 4GB of storage onboard [1]. That's room for 97\nhours of mp3 96kbps audio [2], and if we're going full conspiracy they could\nhave put an entirely different flash chip in there with the wrong markings.\n\n[1] https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/Amazon+Echo+Dot+Teardown/613... [2]\nhttps://soundandpicture.com/2011/06/audio-memory-cards-how-m...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 19467012,
        "hacker": "HenryBemis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 172,
        "comment": "Haha, that title reminds me of \"Eddie, what have you done for me lately\" from\nEddie Murphy's \"Raw\"!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.129"
    },
    {
        "id": 19648104,
        "hacker": "HenryBemis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 172,
        "comment": "I can only imagine that this would just make the photos unusable (I imagine a\n\"John Smith\" printed diagonally on a photo, enough to make it 'viewable' by\nfriends, but unusable by advertisers. Of course there is always photoshop, and\nI will assume that even if someone watermarks a photo like that, someone,\nsomewhere can spend 10mins and process/edit the semi-transparent letters so as\nto 'remove' them from the picture.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19903627,
        "hacker": "HenryBemis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 172,
        "comment": "On Android, on Firefox you can add NoScript, PrivacyBadger, AdblockPlus\n(plenty of lists here [1]), and if you go all the way and root it, you can\nreplace the hosts file [2]. I personally use zero FB products, and use NoRoot\nFirewall with global rule to block 31.13.x.x and a couple of other FB IP\nranges. That also means that I exclude myself from WhatsApp and Instagram.\n\n[1]: https://filterlists.com/\n\n[2]: https://someonewhocares.org/hosts/\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.042"
    },
    {
        "id": 16743718,
        "hacker": "HenryBemis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 172,
        "comment": "I was really looking to see if it was April 1st thing back at the time. The\nRFC was so funny it reminded me of standard random number = 4 [1].\n\n[1]: https://www.xkcd.com/221/\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.010"
    },
    {
        "id": 19539342,
        "hacker": "tropo",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 173,
        "comment": "No, \"fair\" is more like a lack of fraud or coercion. It means that you get\nwhat you can manage without those, which is generally the market rate. You may\nbe able to trade off pay, safety, respect, and hours. (give up some of one to\nget more of another) The deal you get comes from the value you bring. Getting\nmore than your share, for example by coercion against the employer or by\ndefrauding the employer, is definitely not fair.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.193"
    },
    {
        "id": 19221610,
        "hacker": "tropo",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 173,
        "comment": "An easy way to encourage unthinking hate towards a group is to falsely tag\nthem with the term \"nazi\". Be careful here.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.217"
    },
    {
        "id": 11726458,
        "hacker": "tropo",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 173,
        "comment": "See for yourself: http://www.uhc.com/\n\nOK, it's UnitedHealthcare® if you want silly capitalization.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12703647,
        "hacker": "tropo",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 173,
        "comment": "With fundamental core values getting different priority, anything that is a\nwell-reasoned argument to one side is nonsense to the other side.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.062"
    },
    {
        "id": 18985493,
        "hacker": "tropo",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 173,
        "comment": "This is a terrible name conflict.\n\nBon, along with New B, was an immediate ancestor to C. The history gets more\nconfusing with another Bon showing up half a century later.\n\nBon was created for Multics by Ken Thompson. His wife Bonnie, like this other\nperson's mother, was the inspiration for the name.\n\nKen Thompson has naming priority.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.136"
    },
    {
        "id": 4521864,
        "hacker": "nhebb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 174,
        "comment": "I understand that it's anti-Muslim, but is that \"hate speech\"? If it were an\nanti-Christian video that showcased Jesus as a pedophile and philanderer,\nwould it be labeled as such? It's free speech.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 3266316,
        "hacker": "nhebb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 174,
        "comment": "Link to document in question:\nhttp://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/divers/stoa/201...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7763357,
        "hacker": "nhebb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 174,
        "comment": "Yeah, my machine learned not to visit that page again.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11228883,
        "hacker": "maaku",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 175,
        "comment": "The goal is not mass adoption. The goal is nonpolitical money.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9139353,
        "hacker": "maaku",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 175,
        "comment": "It's meant to be for CS students.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6613461,
        "hacker": "maaku",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 175,
        "comment": "Magnitude 6.8, felt as ~mag 4 on the mainland.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6956789,
        "hacker": "maaku",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 175,
        "comment": "You shouldn't want controllers of the same type, no? That increases chances of\ndata loss due to design flaw.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.062"
    },
    {
        "id": 6982799,
        "hacker": "maaku",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 175,
        "comment": "When the machinery you want to lay out is composed of carbon atoms placed at\nsub-nanometer scale, 10-20 heavy atoms is like boxing gloves.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 9741800,
        "hacker": "maaku",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 175,
        "comment": "Under kilometers of ice? A non-issue.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 17535784,
        "hacker": "egypturnash",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 176,
        "comment": "Creepy lady with no sense of boundaries got on a plane, switched seats with\nsomeone behind her so she could be with her SO. She then spent the entire rest\nof the flight watching the person she switched with chat with the person she\nwould have sat next to, reading every interaction as a budding romance.\n\nShe took a ton of photos of these interactions, captioned them with her\nspeculations, and posted them to Twitter. This thread went viral.\n\nIt’s all pretty creepy and invasive.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.144"
    },
    {
        "id": 6568820,
        "hacker": "egypturnash",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 176,
        "comment": "I would imagine that Apple can also say \"this developer ID is owned by this\nperson, and we just blacklisted another one owned by them\", then proceed to\nblacklist all of the IDs they've generated\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 16684918,
        "hacker": "egypturnash",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 176,
        "comment": "They're boring in part because you're seeing big-budget movies, with a small\narmy's worth of effects crews. When it takes something like twenty minutes for\nall the names to scroll by slowly enough for you to pick out the name of your\ncousin's brother who worked at Foobar Digital, there's just kind of not much\nyou can do. If you've got a _really_ big budget you might have some animation\ngoing on during the end credits, or at least cool images - but even those\nusually taper out once you start listing the seventeen different effects\nhouses you outsourced scenes to.\n\nIt's a lot more bearable if you watch movies that aren't full of effects.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.014"
    },
    {
        "id": 20025281,
        "hacker": "asark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 177,
        "comment": "OTOH I'm not sure why stalking is legal, provided you do it in bulk.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 18672240,
        "hacker": "asark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 177,
        "comment": "It's not a global object—it's an instance of the object for the component\nyou're using. The whole thing's a terrible OOP system in a language that\nalready has a built-in mediocre OOP system, which terrible OOP system is, in\nthe end, just a(n inefficient) pass-through to same built-in mediocre OOP\nsystem.\n\nThe posters here wondering why you can't name them are on to something. I\nassume it's because then it'd be _too_ obvious that's what they're doing, and\nwhoever's paying people on that team (I really hope it's not more than one\nperson, it's not hard work, but it probably is) might notice and make them\nstop, and maybe the React team at FB would even shrink in size, and we can't\nhave _that_.\n\nI'm not sure what other explanation there could be for such comically-wasteful\nsandcastle building. I assume it's a combination of individual incentives to\nwork on something not-difficult but flashy and prominent, with project\nincentives to never need fewer people than they currently have.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.171"
    },
    {
        "id": 20569030,
        "hacker": "asark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 177,
        "comment": "Ours has definitely ended up playing to an empty room for a good long while, a\nfew times.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.070"
    },
    {
        "id": 6291310,
        "hacker": "tachyonbeam",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 178,
        "comment": "And imagine teenagers ended up acquiring it, and getting access to those\nlaunch codes! _cue Hollywood movie scenario_\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19921340,
        "hacker": "tachyonbeam",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 178,
        "comment": "Why don't you provide some comments on how Lisp machines implemented GC\nacceleration, and how the approach outlined in this paper is worse? Go...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 19360134,
        "hacker": "tachyonbeam",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 178,
        "comment": "That depends. I'm in academia. I'm surrounded by MSc and PhD students. Some of\nthem are truly creative, but they are the minority. Most of them are happy to\nimplement an idea that was assigned to them by a professor they're working\nwith, or make small incremental extensions to existing research. In this line\nof work, what matters most is getting publications. I would say (this is my\npersonal impression) that many successful academics are not creative types,\nthey conservative and incremental, but most importantly, hard working, detail\noriented and determined.\n\nAll that being said, I wish academia was more about really thinking out of the\nbox, playing with ideas and trying things that are a little more \"out there\",\nbut from what I've seen in the last decade, it isn't really the case, at least\nnot in STEM.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.232"
    },
    {
        "id": 12378036,
        "hacker": "tachyonbeam",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 178,
        "comment": "Newbie question: if there are no particles, then why are there quantized\npackets of energy such as photons?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10164069,
        "hacker": "creshal",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 179,
        "comment": "V2.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11110564,
        "hacker": "creshal",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 179,
        "comment": "> If you don't need full control or maximum performance, something like OpenGL\n> ES 2 will still be a lot easier to program because it does a lot of things\n> for you that you would have to do yourself when using Vulkan.\n\nWhich is normally done by the game engine. And the big ones are already\nmigrating to Metal et. al.\n\nIs the market for self-made game engines still that big? From a consumers\nperspective, virtually everything is on one of the \"big\" engines nowadays\n(when in doubt, Unity).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.043"
    },
    {
        "id": 9420337,
        "hacker": "creshal",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 179,
        "comment": "The default Android browser is no longer supported, and the embedded Chrome is\nblink-based and less and less webkit-ish.\n\n(And even the different Webkit ports can't be thrown into the same bag.\n\nCompare e.g. Safari on OSX, Safari on Windows, Midori on Windows and Midori on\nLinux. Two webkit browsers, crass rendering and behavioural differences\nbetween them and on each platform.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 4200610,
        "hacker": "vibrunazo",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 180,
        "comment": "Are you saying that now that we have over 2 years of empirical evidence that\nWP is causing a _decrease_ in market share and revenue for both MSFT and\nNokia. It looks better after that than before when WP's future was uncertain?\n\nYou people seem to forget that WP is not a brand new player that no one knows\nwhat's gonna happen to it anymore. It's been over 2 years. The evidence is in.\nIt's no longer a question of whether \"will it be a failure\". It already _was_\na failure.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.017"
    },
    {
        "id": 3983618,
        "hacker": "vibrunazo",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 180,
        "comment": "You can compile Go to js with gwt. You can reuse code that way. I personally\neven reuse Java code between Android, front end Web and server. Because of\ngwt.\n\nI don't think there are many people who choose js because they like it. It's\nusually because they feel forced. Javascript is a terrible language, I always\nprefer one of the compilers.\n\nDart can't come fast enough.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.121"
    },
    {
        "id": 4118235,
        "hacker": "vibrunazo",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 180,
        "comment": "They make most of their money from cocaine and methamphetamine (which can be\nlegally acquired, but that didn't stop traffic). 90% of all cocaine in the US\ncome from mexico. [1] Do you mean cocaine should be legalized? Alcohol is a\nbad analogy to legalizing cocaine, you should probably be comparing to the\nOpium Wars instead, which didn't really end well. [2]\n\n[1] http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL34215.pdf\n\n[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opium_Wars\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.022"
    },
    {
        "id": 20492574,
        "hacker": "DuskStar",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 181,
        "comment": "From the GGP:\n\n> NYC was crippled by Sandy, and that didn’t lead to any changes.\n\nThis is what I was referring to. Would the Democrats have implemented more\nhurricane protections?\n\nI don't think either party has any sort of sane carbon-reducing policy. The\nRepublicans are obviously insane, but the Democrats seem to be focused more on\nattacking politically charged targets than on actually getting things done.\nYou say they've \"attempted\" action - I'd say they've implemented things that\nare more virtue signaling than effective. (plastic bag bans, straw bans...\nThese are not the actions of someone who cares about the environment more than\npolitical point-scoring)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.170"
    },
    {
        "id": 15565830,
        "hacker": "DuskStar",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 181,
        "comment": "As good as that one is, and I do rather like the themes, it loses heavily in\ndepth and complexity to Kittens Game. Universal Paperclips will take under a\nday to beat; Kittens Game will not fall so easily.\n\nhttps://bloodrizer.ru/games/kittens/\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.024"
    },
    {
        "id": 18475205,
        "hacker": "DuskStar",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 181,
        "comment": "This report is so horribly biased. The \"austerity\" in question is a decline in\nspending as a proportion of GDP since 2009, NOT actual cuts. _That 's normal_\nwhen recovering from a recession!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.271"
    },
    {
        "id": 2063909,
        "hacker": "bugsy",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 182,
        "comment": "That's not the consumer debt figure. Consumer debt, which is credit cards and\nother unsecured, mostly high interest debt, is $2399 billion.\n\nhttp://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/g19/current/default.h...\n\nThat comes to $2399 billion / 307 million people = $7814 per person.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.018"
    },
    {
        "id": 2381474,
        "hacker": "bugsy",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 182,
        "comment": "I have started a number of successful businesses. Startups do not need \"help\"\nfrom the government. If you need \"help\" to start a software company that\nrequires almost no capital investment, you are probably very incompetent or\nhave chosen a very bad business plan.\n\nHere is what startups need from government: nothing.\n\nI don't mean no chance, I mean nothing as in the less the better.\n\nLess paperwork, less harassment, less bureaucrats nosing around and screwing\nup things and creating a HOSTILE environment to do business so that their\nfriends in the giant corporations don't have any pesky little upstarts\nupsetting their apple carts.\n\nThat's what small business needs to succeed. Less of everything, and\npreferably to be LEFT COMPLETELY ALONE.\n\nAnytime the government is making pronouncements about helping small business\nand entrepreneurs and spending money on publicity campaigns and billboards and\nadverts and passing new laws with regulations to tell us how everything is\ngoing to be done under the new system, you can be sure of one thing. The\nintent is not to help small business at all. That claim is just a cover for\nwhatever the real agenda is. Usually it is to protect big business who is\nentangled with various politicians.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.068"
    },
    {
        "id": 2605319,
        "hacker": "bugsy",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 182,
        "comment": "I found the article irritating. He trisects reasons for colleges into three\ncategories, which he sees as worthy goals, but which I paraphrase from a\ncritical perspective thus:\n\n1\\. Society is a machine that trains worker ants for roles in production which\nserves the goals of the society. The efficient operation of this machine\nrequires that intellectual knowledge workers be identified, tested, corralled\ninto specialties with a certification which is accurate and uniform so that\nfactories can employ known quality product cogs to place in their production\nlines.\n\n2\\. People are stupid and lazy and do not like to learn things. College forces\nthem to learn things so they will not be so stupid no more.\n\n3\\. People need specific technical skills and training to do technical jobs\nfrom nursing to product design. Colleges need to provide uniform quality\nvocational training to accomplish this end.\n\nHe also dismisses much of the research that shows colleges do not teach much\ncritical thinking by suggesting that if a measurement gives a surprising\nresult, the measurement is wrong since we know the result should be otherwise.\n\nThese are the arguments of a desperate man who does not understand humans or\nwhat education is.\n\nThis all said, I was fascinated and amazed that his three reasons for college\nmatch up with the criticism of educational reformers such as John Gatto, who\nargues that the _problem_ with contemporary education is that it trains\nfactory workers, performs vocational education and assumes people hate\nlearning and must be forced to learn things when in fact people actually are\nbuilt to learn and will pursue it naturally unless their spirit is crushed by\ninstitutionalized forced schooling.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.073"
    },
    {
        "id": 15761203,
        "hacker": "NTDF9",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 183,
        "comment": "Do they use as much electricity JUST to validate a transaction?\n\nWith bitcoin, we have electricity consumption per transaction AANNDDD lights\nin bldgs to provide services like loans, insurance, trading?\n\nWtf?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 18593973,
        "hacker": "NTDF9",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 183,
        "comment": "Doesn't debt issued by US treasury have to be funded by private holders of US\ndollars? Or does the Fed simply buy out the debt issued by treasury?\n\nI thought the Fed simply buys only a small portion of US treasury debt (thus\nprinting money) but the vast majority of that treasury debt is purchased by\nholders of US dollars (banks, funds, China, Japan etc.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.042"
    },
    {
        "id": 17517016,
        "hacker": "NTDF9",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 183,
        "comment": "I've seen many companies hedging their bets and having satellite offices in\nCanada, Ireland, India, Singapore, Australia to be able to retain\ninternational talent.\n\nAt some level, these immigrant workers are not factory workers to be easily\nreplaced. They tend to have lots of institutional experience and drive\n(demonstrated by the fact that they uprooted their lives elsewhere to live in\na new country in the first place).\n\nI've had the pleasure of working with many such people. But the signs are\nclear. There are fewer Americans who want to do tech jobs and the\nadministration isn't allowing highly educated immigrants to come and work.\nEven the ones they allow have a miserable time just managing paperwork and\nfollowing the law.\n\nWhat do execs do to retain these folks? Just move jobs to where the talent is\nat. Talent lost, taxes lost, model immigrants lost, vibrancy lost. :(\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.069"
    },
    {
        "id": 11589050,
        "hacker": "sgt101",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 184,
        "comment": "Also exploration/conquest - although that might not be positive when summed\neverywhere. I think it's clear that the acquisition of crops from the new\nworld (potatoes, tomatoes, chillies, okra, maize, squash) changed agriculture\nin Europe.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.155"
    },
    {
        "id": 15781993,
        "hacker": "sgt101",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 184,
        "comment": "Yes - the big surprise of the sudden high score in the high school test made\nme smile as well.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.124"
    },
    {
        "id": 16557974,
        "hacker": "sgt101",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 184,
        "comment": "Wohha - we need to go to 0 emissions in 30 years. Even in the very best case\nFusion will be producing ~20% of our energy by then (and I stress, this was\nachieved with Fission in some states because of bomb making; so it proves it's\npossible but definitely not going to happen by itself). So we need renewables\nand electric cars for at least 70 years. And electric cars actually seem\nbetter (faster, more reliable) than ice ones.\n\nAlso, just because you can make fertilizers and put them on crops doesn't mean\nthat's a good idea. Water courses all over the world are poisoned with\nchemical fertilizers. Same for desalinization - the by products are nasty.\n\nAnd fusion itself will produce radioactive waste. The linings of the reactors\nbecome ablated and radioactive and I think that one of the great benefits of\nProfessor Whyte's scheme is that servicing the reactor becomes much easier and\nfaster - but the removed components need to be dealt with carefully.\n\nIt's a great and exciting thing - but not a panacea; we have to work _hard_ to\ndeliver a liveable world for 10 billion and the 500 years after the peak.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.166"
    },
    {
        "id": 20827958,
        "hacker": "sgt101",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 184,
        "comment": ">Sometimes I think scientists fall for the same simplistic patterns of\nthinking that the men on the street fall for every day.\n\nPractising scientists are loath to speculate without good evidence; it lays\nthem open to criticism by peers, and damages their credibility with reviewers.\nUnfortunately this means that there is often a lot of inertia that slows the\nchange of focus and means that there is some waste as the wrong work gets done\n(work that is known to be irrelevant by most of the community, but passes\nreview). On the other hand this reticence does mean that there is less\nflailing around and hype than you see in other areas - such as business IT\nfads (Big Data, ML, AI, Serverless, Microservices...)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.115"
    },
    {
        "id": 14923102,
        "hacker": "sgt101",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 184,
        "comment": "In the sense that the executive has the power to enable your project for six\nmonths and risks losing $500k of stock options if she is wrong I think she is\na stakeholder.\n\nI wish I had some steak like that!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.625"
    },
    {
        "id": 14941338,
        "hacker": "sgt101",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 184,
        "comment": "This isn't the difficult or unpleasant bit of sheep farming, delivering a good\nlamb is actually wonderful. Sheep in pain, dead lambs, malformed lambs,\ndrowned lambs - these are harder. Carrying injured sheep soaked to the skin in\na force 9, that's bloody horrible. Doing it once in a while is invigorating\nbut the grind, year after year all through the winter.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.183"
    },
    {
        "id": 13569497,
        "hacker": "sgt101",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 184,
        "comment": "I think that it depends what you mean by \"learning\". Creating a mapping to a\ntraining set where you have a sufficiently expressive representation is\ntrivial - simply create a list, and then find the most efficient\nrepresentation of the list; zip it for example. The point of learning is to\ngeneralize from the training set to unseen examples via the representation and\nfigure 1 of the paper shows (part c) that this is not what is claimed for\ncorrupted or randomized examples in this paper. How the non generalised claims\nthen extend to the discussions in section 2 leaves me flailing, but that's not\nunusual! However, my thought is that the difficulty is measurement of the\nstructural risk of a deep network where network weights very subtly encode\ninformation, or don't depending on the network. Perhaps sweeping the networks\nand then setting weights below a threshold to 0 and measuring the\ngeneralisation error impact would be a way to measure what in the network is\nuseful encoding and what isn't? The rest of the network could be easily\n\"measured\" as bits to encode?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.129"
    },
    {
        "id": 18013763,
        "hacker": "sgt101",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 184,
        "comment": "Interestingly in the UK the \"mysterious, secret, and occult\" has been resolved\nby the state with the maxim : \"so it belongs to the Queen\" (as the head of\nstate, not personally!)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 21180615,
        "hacker": "snowwrestler",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 185,
        "comment": "Me too, and when I need to install non-Apple-approved software, I log into my\nadmin account, do it, then log out of it again.\n\nOnce the software is installed, I can use it from my regular account.\n\n> Staff do have local administrator access to their machines, but are not\n> supposed to use it for regular operations for safety.\n\nThe point of this exercise is that installing random software from the\nInternet shouldn't be a regular operation; users should take extra care when\ndoing it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 5521612,
        "hacker": "snowwrestler",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 185,
        "comment": "I don't understand why people complain about Launchpad. It's no dumber than\nFront Row, which shipped on Snow Leopard and several versions prior, and like\nFront Row, it's totally hidden unless you choose to invoke it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.056"
    },
    {
        "id": 6601295,
        "hacker": "snowwrestler",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 185,
        "comment": "Since this only works with Gmail, Google Apps, Yahoo, AOL, and iCloud, the\nemail is already with a third party.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6998120,
        "hacker": "snowwrestler",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 185,
        "comment": "Unicode domain names are no more dangerous than HTML emails, which can also be\nused to fool people into clicking links that look like one site but go to\nanother.\n\nUnicode or not, if you type in apple.com on your English keyboard, you will go\nto the website of Apple, Inc. (Unless your DNS cache has been poisoned.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.283"
    },
    {
        "id": 9145333,
        "hacker": "snowwrestler",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 185,
        "comment": "There are three levels to understanding contracts.\n\n1) The language itself.\n\nContracts are written in English (at least in the U.S.), so anyone with a\nstrong understanding of English can read one top to bottom and comprehend what\nit is saying.\n\nExperience in analyzing writing (like from a few college English courses) can\nhelp a lot, both in learning to quickly parse sentences, and in learning to\ninfer motivations from the language on the page. You always want to be able to\nanswer \"why did they write it this way? What are they trying to get?\"\n\n2) What is typical and standard in contracts.\n\nYou can only get this from experience--from reading a lot of contracts--\nbecause it's often industry-specific.\n\nFor example, many software contracts, even 6 figure enterprise deals, include\nan ALL CAPS DISCLAIMER OF LIABILITY. THIS SOFTWARE IS OFFERED AS-IS AND\nWITHOUT WARRANTY. WE DON'T GUARANTEE THIS WILL WORK FOR YOUR PURPOSES, OR\nINDEED, WORK AT ALL.\n\nI'm exaggerating, but not by much. This is a totally standard clause in the\nsoftware industry, so whether or not you like it, you generally just have to\nswallow it if you want to do the deal\n\nLikewise, most EULAs are very similar to one another. Once you've carefully\nread a few of them, you can quickly skim for the important bits (copyright,\nliability, data sharing) on new ones.\n\n3) What the law says.\n\nContracts can't break the law. For example a contract that contains lies would\nbe fraudulent. A contract that says you need to speed or drive drunk is not\nenforceable. A contract that says you can commit murder would not protect you\nfrom prosecution.\n\nThis is probably the hardest area to build knowledge, without going to law\nschool. For me, it has helped to read news stories and good forums like HN.\nFor example, I know that non-compete clauses in employment contracts are\nunenforceable in California, because so many people have said so.\n\nThere are some lawyers who post here--grellas for example--and AMAs from\nlawyers on Reddit are helpful too.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.139"
    },
    {
        "id": 11431693,
        "hacker": "snowwrestler",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 185,
        "comment": "But that number takes into account the capital that companies park overseas to\navoid the nominal rate. So it's not a good counterargument to the idea that\ncompanies park money overseas to avoid the nominal rate.\n\nPut another way, the low effective rate doesn't disprove that 35% is too high\n--it demonstrates the _effect_ of having such a high nominal rate.\n\nIt would be better to have a competitive nominal rate. Then companies would\nmove their capital based on business, not tax, reasons.\n\nFor example, the U.S. tax rate provides an incentive for overseas\nmanufacturing. If Apple moves capital from Ireland to China to invest in a new\nFoxconn factory, they pay a lower tax rate than if they moved the same amount\nof capital from Ireland to Texas to invest in a new factory there. Even if all\nthe business costs were same between China and Texas, China would win on the\ntax costs.\n\nIt's an impediment to bringing more manufacturing jobs back to the U.S., and a\none-time tax holiday will not solve it. The rate needs to be permanently\nlowered. Unfortunately the people most upset about the decline of U.S.\nmanufacturing jobs tend to see the corporate tax rate as a tool of justice,\nand therefore reject lowering the rate on principle.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.155"
    },
    {
        "id": 13691604,
        "hacker": "snowwrestler",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 185,
        "comment": "This story, and the UFO stories from the 50s and 60s, demonstrate the enduring\npower of a well-crafted cover story.\n\nLong after the real secret information is widely known (radar and experimental\naircraft), the cover stories are still widely believed.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 14807532,
        "hacker": "Analemma_",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 186,
        "comment": "> So if you go to work for a startup, you should demand substantially more\n> money than with an established company.\n\nThe problem is that most startups can't match, much less beat, established\ncompanies on salary, and they'll just turn you down. It's not even malice or\ngreed on their part, it's just that they have a finite runway and a few tens\nof thousands of dollars a year on a single person can mean the difference\nbetween life and death.\n\nNo one wants to say it out loud, but I'm starting to think that the startup\neconomy _requires_ people to accept the gamble of shit salary for a chance at\nthe equity lottery. I decided not to play along with that and only work for\nmegacorps, but it's up to each individual.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.015"
    },
    {
        "id": 14985276,
        "hacker": "Analemma_",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 186,
        "comment": "IANAL, but is it really a \"taking\" if the state wants him to maintain the\nexisting level of access that the previous owner provided? At that point the\npublic access seems to be implicitly part of the property he purchased and\nnothing is being expropriated.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.058"
    },
    {
        "id": 19601584,
        "hacker": "Analemma_",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 186,
        "comment": "Because this isn’t a Twitter rant from a random nobody; New Zealand’s privacy\ncommissioner probably has regulatory authority (or at least influence) to\nforce Facebook to change its behavior, at least in NZ. If he’s using language\nthis strong that probably indicates a crackdown is coming.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.106"
    },
    {
        "id": 13142810,
        "hacker": "Analemma_",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 186,
        "comment": "If it was a big secret that this was how Linux worked and it took the\ncompanies by surprise, I could see how this could be a bad thing, but it never\nhas been: Linus has always been very upfront that he is Benevolent Dictator\nfor Life and always has the last word. Don't get onboard if you don't like\nthat system.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.180"
    },
    {
        "id": 12354701,
        "hacker": "Analemma_",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 186,
        "comment": "[voluntarily removed]\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14010221,
        "hacker": "Analemma_",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 186,
        "comment": "idlewords, this comment has tremendous negative utility for humanity. By\npointing out obvious nepotism and corruption in the AI risk charity field, you\nmake people less likely to donate in the future, thus increasing the\nlikelihood of a takeover from the robots. You must delete this comment; the\nfate of the world depends on it!\n\n/s\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.022"
    },
    {
        "id": 18020742,
        "hacker": "twblalock",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 187,
        "comment": "But Facebook itself _is_ engaging in illegal activity by publishing those ads!\nIt is against the law to do that.\n\nIf you commit a crime because somebody else asked you to do it, does that mean\nyou didn’t break the law?\n\nIf Facebook commits a crime because someone asked them to do it, does that\nmean they didn’t break the law?\n\nHow could the answers to those two questions be different?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.170"
    },
    {
        "id": 18571209,
        "hacker": "twblalock",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 187,
        "comment": "> What happens if a correction happens in the SUV/Truck market that the time\n> horizon starts to reflect sedans (again)?\n\nI guess GM and Ford would just start making sedans again?\n\nThey could switch back. A lot of the crossovers are built on lifted sedan\nplatforms anyway.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13153793,
        "hacker": "twblalock",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 187,
        "comment": "> In other words, I think it's not StormFront that's \"gaming\" the system. The\n> system is made of people, some of whom really really like StormFront, and\n> Google's results (for better or worse) just reflect that reality.\n\nThis needs to be more widely recognized. Google autocomplete results, fake\nnews on Facebook, etc. are they way they are because a significant number of\npeople lack critical thinking skills or seek affirmation of their current\nbeliefs. People _want_ to read those things -- if they didn't click on them,\nthey would not end up being so visible.\n\nThis means that tweaking Google's algorithm, or filtering fake news from\nFacebook, will backfire and appear to be censorship. It will drive the people\nwho are interested in reading fake news to work harder to find it, and it will\nerode their trust in mainstream media. In other words, such a solution would\nworsen the problem it intends to solve.\n\nThis isn't really a technical problem. It's a consequence of human nature, and\nI'm pessimistic about the viability of the technological solutions that have\nbeen proposed so far.\n\nThis also reinforces my view that most people don't have good critical\nthinking skills. I've taught college students who would believe pretty much\nanything they read online. Nobody ever taught them that they should verify\nwhat they read before they believe it. I really wish school curricula would\ninclude better education in this area. But some of my Facebook friends who\n\"like\" the fake news stories are teachers, so I'm pessimistic about this as\nwell.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.053"
    },
    {
        "id": 9927445,
        "hacker": "Nadya",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 188,
        "comment": "I was traveling abroad in Japan and was asked by a Japanese woman if I was\nlost or needed help.\n\nI was looking at the station map looking for how many stops until the station\nI had to get off at. I'm fluent in Japanese though - and don't think I was\ngiving off a \"I'm lost\" look. She simply assumed I was lost because I don't\nlook Japanese and was staring at a map.\n\nInstead of assuming she was racist, intentionally or unintentionally, I\nassumed she was _trying to be nice and offer me help because she thought I\nlooked lost_.\n\nBut extending hospitality or a helping hand is now seen as a _microaggresion_\nagainst a person.\n\nIt's gotten to the point that I let doors slam into peoples' faces less I make\nthem think I'm being sexist for holding the door for them. After all - if they\nwant me to hold the door they can ask me to hold it for them. Otherwise\nthey're fully capable of opening the door themselves.\n\nOnce-upon-a-time it was _polite_ to keep a door held open for someone. Not\nanymore.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.126"
    },
    {
        "id": 13580568,
        "hacker": "Nadya",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 188,
        "comment": "\n    \n    \n        grep /^unsafe(\\s\\{)|(\\sfn)|(\\strait)|(\\simpl)/\n    \n\nSome variation of that, or four individual greps. I forgot how to use OR\nproperly in Regex but each of those works individually. Tested on regex101 [0]\nagainst the following code:\n\n    \n    \n        unsafe {\n            // Scary stuff...\n        }\n        \n        unsafe trait Scary { }\n        \n        unsafe impl Scary for i32 {}\n        \n        unsafe fn danger_will_robinson() {\n            // Scary stuff...\n        }\n    \n    \n\nThat should catch all four instances that unsafe can be called in without any\nfalse positives. Since `fn`, `trait` and `impl` are keywords they won't\nchange. Of course, any comments should be removed beforehand in case of a\ncommented out unsafe block.\n\n[0] https://regex101.com/\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.267"
    },
    {
        "id": 13815871,
        "hacker": "Nadya",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 188,
        "comment": "Take Twitter as an example - using older versions of Firefox.\n\nThey claim that \"videos are not supported in your browser\" but on occasion the\nvideo begins playing before being paused. Sometimes the \"what version is your\nbrowser\" check takes long enough for the entire video to finish playing. The\nvideos are _obviously_ supported because they work! I know this because the\nsame video that tells me \"it isn't supported\" will sometimes partially or\ncompletely play (so it isn't that different videos are being served\ndifferently).\n\nSo why is Twitter telling me they don't work?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.024"
    },
    {
        "id": 19079608,
        "hacker": "tracker1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 189,
        "comment": "So, if _YOUR_ government uses Linux, but doesn't participate in Linux\ndevelopment, it's bad for everyone else? Most Linux users aren't contributing\nto Linux itself. And likely less than half are making any significant\ncontribution to Open Source Software at all. It's still useful software, and I\nstill appreciate everyone that does work on it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.018"
    },
    {
        "id": 19629228,
        "hacker": "tracker1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 189,
        "comment": "I just don't like the spacing with DejaVu... it's awkward is about all I can\nsay about it. I do like Roboto a lot myself, and it's generally my default\nthese days.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.275"
    },
    {
        "id": 20214923,
        "hacker": "tracker1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 189,
        "comment": "I've also heard that the pricing of for-profit schools is to maximize backed\nloans out before a student drops out (since most drop around the end of their\nsecond year). I know a lot of people who couldn't get funding for their final\nyear of study.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 20364756,
        "hacker": "tracker1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 189,
        "comment": "Just tried with ublock disabled, it's about 3.1mb and loaded in 3 seconds flat\nhere. I'm not sure what GP is going on about. Amazon was 14.4mb and took about\n4.5s to settle down.\n\nI will say, Amazon's above the fold paint was faster, but it did load a _LOT_\nafter that.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.126"
    },
    {
        "id": 12568847,
        "hacker": "tracker1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 189,
        "comment": "I know that it's (now) a known bug... unfortunately it wasn't known when it\nhappened to me, and I'd long since replaced it when I found out.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.275"
    },
    {
        "id": 13912787,
        "hacker": "tracker1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 189,
        "comment": "Fortunately, at a macro level.. something like 70-80% of what we take in are\npurely caloric needs... I mean, under 100g of sugars a day, and over 80-120g\nof protein.. but otherwise, for the most part calories are calories. We do\nneed to reduce the amount of refined sugars, starches and fats in our diets,\nand increase the amount of raw vegetables and fruit... I'm not talking a\nveggie/vegan diet.. but having some mix, and keeping some things in that\nabove/below block.\n\nAdjusting for special dietary needs (diabetes, allergies, pku etc).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.155"
    },
    {
        "id": 14387450,
        "hacker": "tracker1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 189,
        "comment": "See the definition of prevalent... Even if it's proprietary, it's pretty\nwidespread... not to mention other file systems called TFS already.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.062"
    },
    {
        "id": 11905327,
        "hacker": "tracker1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 189,
        "comment": "On the flip side, they aren't charging an arm and a leg for the 64gb, which is\nquite a bit of storage, though a microsd would be a nice addition. As to the\nremovable battery, if it's serviceable enough, shouldn't be too bad. The\nbackplate on the OPO wasn't bad at all, ordered the bamboo back separately and\nwas easy enough to install.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.052"
    },
    {
        "id": 9194386,
        "hacker": "tracker1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 189,
        "comment": "I'm a bit split at this point.. in general, I have an ubuntu server VM running\n(with docker), with my home directory mounted via samba as a drive in windows,\nand have a couple conemu tabs open ssh'd into the VM... I can continue to edit\nin windows, but run in Linux.\n\nAt least for my stuff that will run in Linux (node/iojs and golang) targeting\ndocker containers, it works well.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 6118191,
        "hacker": "tracker1",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 189,
        "comment": "I think it depends on the organization and how many hands in the mix... If you\nhave one or two stake holders and one person taking charge of the direction of\ndevelopment, it can come out pretty well.\n\nOn the flip side it isn't always management.. I've seen developers create\nforms that should be simple with really weird layouts on screen that make\nabsolutely no sense at all.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.030"
    },
    {
        "id": 1967498,
        "hacker": "recoiledsnake",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 190,
        "comment": "Did you even read the article? They were mentioning weight and battery life\nnumbers all over.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 5705436,
        "hacker": "recoiledsnake",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 190,
        "comment": "Alternate headline: Microsoft protects hundreds of millions of Skype users by\ngoing to the effort of checking even https URLs in chat for malware and spam.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 2902218,
        "hacker": "recoiledsnake",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 190,
        "comment": "Like they gave up on the XBox while bleeding billions?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 5717148,
        "hacker": "recoiledsnake",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 190,
        "comment": "Note that the complaint is not about lack of upvotes, it's about people going\nout of their way to use their flagging powers which is meant only for spam\nlinks.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 2479746,
        "hacker": "aaronbrethorst",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 191,
        "comment": "Check out cocoaobjects.com; I think they'll satisfy your need.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 1840847,
        "hacker": "aaronbrethorst",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 191,
        "comment": "well, for starters:\n\n    \n    \n        Invalid address: sadasaYou must provide at least one recipient email address. \n        Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /srv/www/salespanelpro.com/public_html/demo/control/libraries/phpmailer/class.phpmailer.php:464) in /srv/www/salespanelpro.com/public_html/demo/control/autologin.php on line 62\n    \n\nI got that by giving you a bogus email address in your \"see demo\" thing. I\nunderstand why you want an email address, but I'm not interested in giving one\nup. Not yet, anyway.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.212"
    },
    {
        "id": 15727575,
        "hacker": "aaronbrethorst",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 191,
        "comment": "> it's likely nothing nefarious\n\nIt's legal because of the _Citizens United_ Supreme Court decision, but I hope\nthat, before the Koch brothers pass away, we'll see a constitutional amendment\noverturning this egregious decision.\n\nThe idea that money = speech is toxic to democracy.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 9289666,
        "hacker": "TorKlingberg",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 192,
        "comment": "What do you mean with \"ontology\"?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.312"
    },
    {
        "id": 6466067,
        "hacker": "TorKlingberg",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 192,
        "comment": "According to the Wikipedia article, the Dragon's cargo capacity to the ISS is\n3.3t. 6t is for separate \"DragonLab\" missions.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 8657904,
        "hacker": "TorKlingberg",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 192,
        "comment": "You need a huge database of images classified as dog, car, man etc, otherwise\na spammer can download all your images and classify them manually. If you grab\nimages from Google Images, the spammer can do the same thing.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 20300897,
        "hacker": "Scoundreller",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 193,
        "comment": "I was a \"good person to know\" because I could print off cheat codes and\nwalkthroughs for any game, on a dot matrix printer over a 2.4kbps lynx\nconnection.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 16750316,
        "hacker": "Scoundreller",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 193,
        "comment": "For version 2.0: e-bikes\n\nParis’ system is rolling out ebikes on their system. Can’t do that without\ndocks.\n\nBut the capex goes way up now that they all need electrification.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15005420,
        "hacker": "Scoundreller",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 193,
        "comment": "> Also, why would you even have a microwave, toaster, and ELECTRIC dryer?\n> Those all use obscene amounts of power.\n\nFor the former two, I think microwaves and toasters are efficient uses of\nenergy. Heating/toasting the equivalent with propane or some other fuel isn't\nworth the trade-off of running the generator for a few extra minutes.\n\nBut I guess it depends on how big you size your inverter, and if you intend on\nhaving a 2ndary power source.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.004"
    },
    {
        "id": 21516720,
        "hacker": "Scoundreller",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 193,
        "comment": "Heh, I was at the Apple store in Paris and couldn’t understand why people had\nprinted off pieces of paper and marking things off based on their research on\nthe computers there.\n\nLike, how could you not do the research yourself in advance?\n\nI have a hard time someone at the Apple Store doesn’t already have access to\ninternet elsewhere to do their research.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.292"
    },
    {
        "id": 14525431,
        "hacker": "rectang",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 194,
        "comment": "Even in the egregious Wells Fargo case, the executives whose pay was clawed\nback were still money ahead to the tune of 8 figures (Tolstedt) or 9 figures\n(Stumpf). Thousands of low-level employees were ruined, though.\n\nAccountability is for the little people.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.094"
    },
    {
        "id": 17270568,
        "hacker": "rectang",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 194,
        "comment": "It's not zero. The numbers are pretty big:\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treatment-resistant_depression...\n\n _Treatment-resistance is relatively common in cases of Major Depressive\nDisorder. Rates of total remission following antidepressant treatment are only\n50.4%. In cases of depression treated by a primary-care physician, 32% of\npatients partially responded to treatment and 45% did not respond at all._\n\nI'm not advocating withholding help from any of them. It's more of a\nphilosophical quandary.\n\nIf you believe (as I do) that the universe is indifferent to human suffering,\nthat life has no greater purpose beyond this one life, and that minimizing\nhuman suffering is worthwhile; then the idea of forcing someone to live a life\nof pain bothers me. And at the same time, the idea of a suicide increasing the\nsuffering of those left behind also bothers me.\n\nIt's probably impossible to avoid this degenerating into a religious debate,\nbut those are my thoughts.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.013"
    },
    {
        "id": 18608123,
        "hacker": "rectang",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 194,
        "comment": "> _we 've got to share our work with people who may or may not know those\n> tools_\n\nWe can acknowledge the power of network effects while at the same time\ncritiquing design. They both have utility, but they are entirely separate.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20186360,
        "hacker": "Nasrudith",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 195,
        "comment": "The question I have is how can they tell \"Flanders\" viewers from \"bored\" ones\nor \"out of time\" ones short of them flagging it without a lot of manual review\nand guess work?\n\nReviewing viewers on that level sounds even more intensive than filtering\nevery channel and video.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20477075,
        "hacker": "Nasrudith",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 195,
        "comment": "That sounds like a hillariously stupid loophole to get around selling in this\ncase - something to use very passive aggressively about the strict liability\neagle cult laws which are utterly irrelevant to conservation like stray\nfeathers as felonies.\n\nTake out a nominal very short term loan with the not-buyer backed by the\ncollateral and never pay it back. Said item will transfer then.\n\nIt thankfully won't apply to current ivory or rhino horn bans given import\nbans but it would probably work to \"jailbreak\" from home owners associations\nfrom hell given the repossesor wouldn't be bound by a contract they never\nsigned.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.183"
    },
    {
        "id": 20871299,
        "hacker": "Nasrudith",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 195,
        "comment": "That brings to mind a classic issue - it isn't the tech but how it is used.\nThe same standardized test approach which combines the worst features of\nfeudalism and bueracracy with the virtues of neither was there before. The\ngames or lack of them won't change that.\n\nI vividly remember how in Elementary School they had workbooks after workbooks\nof multiple choice analogies with words used within occasionally unexplained.\nThey insisted it was all very important when we asked why so overboard. The\nreal answer became obvious when the SAT was changed to have a writing section\ninstead of an analogies one and they promptly vanishes into the void only to\nappear on standardized tests four questions a year at very most.\n\nThey didn't even have the honesty to say \"It is used a lot for in important\ntest.\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.076"
    },
    {
        "id": 7006864,
        "hacker": "BlackDeath3",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 196,
        "comment": "Wrong thread?\n\nhttps://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=7006679\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 7071758,
        "hacker": "BlackDeath3",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 196,
        "comment": "Knowing that most cars are bound to depreciate quickly wouldn't stop me from\naccepting a nice, new, free one.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.394"
    },
    {
        "id": 7234758,
        "hacker": "BlackDeath3",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 196,
        "comment": "I exist whether you know it or not. I'm not a leprechaun.\n\nWhat is your point?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4415493,
        "hacker": "hartror",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 197,
        "comment": "I grew up reading a lot of Golden Age (1938 to 1946) science fiction authors\n(Asimov, Clarke, Heinlein et al.) and this article provides a wonderful\ninsight into the publishing world in their formative years.\n\nIt must have mirrored something of the revolution that has gone on in modern\ntimes with the internet opening up so many new markets that individuals can\nexploit. Certainly before the advent of paperbacks genre fiction was mostly\nconfined to magazines which is where most (all?) of the Golden Age authors got\ntheir start.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.406"
    },
    {
        "id": 4322658,
        "hacker": "hartror",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 197,
        "comment": "Because amending a constitution is a dangerous thing that should never be\ndone!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.750"
    },
    {
        "id": 2405023,
        "hacker": "hartror",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 197,
        "comment": "The beauty of this is geothermal heat adds the opportunity for life to\ndevelop/survive outside the Goldilocks Zone [1]. Not just in our solar system\nwhere the moons of Jupiter and Saturn are very active geologically due to\ntidal forces [2] but on extrasolar moons and planets that otherwise may not be\nsuited to life.\n\nPerhaps there is more life in the universe where the base energy source is\nthat of geothermal than that of radiation from a star? I wonder what an\nsentient life form evolved from this environment would be like?\n\nI feel a short story coming on.\n\n[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Habitable_zone\n\n[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tidal_force\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 1613969,
        "hacker": "hartror",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 197,
        "comment": "Nice.\n\nThe first study I've heard of of it's type and it confirms the anecdotal\nevidence I've been reading about for years!\n\nHope there are a few more studies like this around so doctors sit up and pay\nattention (pun unintended).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.303"
    },
    {
        "id": 14290229,
        "hacker": "Artlav",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 198,
        "comment": "At 30. Active, never contributed much having been burned several times early\non.\n\nFor me programming is akin to a work of art, so i keep doing various projects\nfor my own fun.\n\nNot sure how one can become \"inactive\", barring a disabling accident.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.102"
    },
    {
        "id": 11753777,
        "hacker": "Artlav",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 198,
        "comment": "Newsletter might be too big of a word, but i do publish various stuff i work\non at http://orbides.org/\n\nYou can also find the e-mail over there in the bottom-right corner.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12321995,
        "hacker": "Artlav",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 198,
        "comment": "I feel like i'm missing something.\n\nIn the \"Why\" section he claims that Rust is a performant language with a low-\nlevel feel.\n\nIn this part, he claims that decoding a tiny JPG image took 2 seconds with his\ncode.\n\nHow is that \"performant\" by any definition?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.067"
    },
    {
        "id": 14135078,
        "hacker": "Artlav",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 198,
        "comment": "It's garbage when you need to switch to CW to continue the conversation. :)\n\nSeriously, when it's unpleasant to listen to. As i said in the other reply,\nwith music the quality is pretty bad on almost any setting, voice just happen\nto be an exception.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.176"
    },
    {
        "id": 20714172,
        "hacker": "brazzy",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 199,
        "comment": "Even from that perspective, it has very little to offer because it completely\nfails to explain how those \"organizational and strategic failures\" actually\nhad anything to do with the torpedoes.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.248"
    },
    {
        "id": 7178175,
        "hacker": "brazzy",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 199,
        "comment": "And then there is the mantis shrimp:\n\nhttp://theoatmeal.com/comics/mantis_shrimp\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4434989,
        "hacker": "brazzy",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 199,
        "comment": "Something you and the parent are missing: the Zynga-style \"social\" games are\noverwhelmingly (80%+) played by a completely different target group than 99%\nof all computer games before them: adult women.\n\nThey are most definitely not going to disappear unless there is competition\nthat appeals to that target group more, and the (admittedly short) experience\nsays it's not going to be something with a big element of skill.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.143"
    },
    {
        "id": 4183751,
        "hacker": "wahnfrieden",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 200,
        "comment": "Hey Daniel, thanks for the educational writeup. I have to wonder about ways\naround the AMI issue. We use puppet to setup new instances (and keep existing\ninstances in sync... although we tend to just recycle EC2 instances anyway).\nThis is pretty nice to work with given its declarative nature, but we have to\nput up with long, long startup/initialization times for new instances. Which\nsucks in downtime of course.\n\nDo you think there's some middle ground of using AMIs but also using puppet\nsomehow, so you make new AMIs as a perf optimization but keep puppet config up\nto date? TBH it's something I've only casually wondered about. But maybe it's\nwhat we both need. Having a puppet config would mean you can launch on\nbasically any provider.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.035"
    },
    {
        "id": 17971620,
        "hacker": "wahnfrieden",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 200,
        "comment": "I have read what he’s been writing about this.\n\nBy the way, “irrational demands for unnecessary effort” is a value judgment.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 9855836,
        "hacker": "wahnfrieden",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 200,
        "comment": "Newer isn't necessarily better with SuperMemo algorithms. They introduced\ntremendous complexity without strong evidence of increased effectiveness, last\nI looked into it - it seems to create more corner cases to manage, if\nanything.\n\nI'd be interested in materials I may be missing.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.260"
    },
    {
        "id": 20898718,
        "hacker": "ummonk",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 201,
        "comment": "Makers who don’t understand 1 or 2 often create slow or insecure code that\noften results in clear user impact.\n\nFor example, I’ve seen diffing / recomputation code operating in O(n^3) or\nO(n^2) where O(n) or O(1) is possible and necessary for reasonable\nperformance. I’ve also seen extremely poor use of network requests (multiple\nserial requests) that happen because the developer doesn’t understand network\nlatency and networking performance (in this case with a single data center in\nthe world).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.107"
    },
    {
        "id": 17738626,
        "hacker": "ummonk",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 201,
        "comment": ">If we assume that we got to 0 because of a rounding error we do know that it\nshould be some positive integer.\n\nThat's assuming we had rounding error from a positive number, not a negative\nnumber. Of course, if you are concerned about rounding, you shouldn't be using\ninteger arithmetic.\n\n>1/(a number approaching 0) produces ever increasing integers.\n\nNo. It produces a bunch of 0s, except when the denominator is 1 (where it\nproduces 1) or the denominator is -1 (where it produces -1). Unless you're\nusing a language like Python, in which case it produces -1 for all negative\ndenominators.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.061"
    },
    {
        "id": 18821656,
        "hacker": "ummonk",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 201,
        "comment": "Waste disposal is basically a nonissue for nuclear power. The amount of waste\nis minuscule, and there are ways to break it down to generate power as well\nusing a fusion-fission hybrid.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.185"
    },
    {
        "id": 17704186,
        "hacker": "ummonk",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 201,
        "comment": "While it might be phrased in a way that implies the customer is partly to\nblame, the actual details would indicate the main problem was with Azure\nKubernetes Service. Critical system daemons going down because the application\nuses too much memory is not a reasonable failure mode (and the AKS team\nrightfully fixed it).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.013"
    },
    {
        "id": 19001944,
        "hacker": "ummonk",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 201,
        "comment": "Yup. E.g. in Manhattan you'd be crazy to not use the subway. It's just faster\nthan everything else, and extremely liberating. In contrast, in SF, if you\nwant to get to your destination in any reasonable amount of time and don't\nyour start and destination are not near the BART line, you need to use car /\nUber / Lyft. Or even a scooter or Go bike is faster than public transit.\n\nSF needs to significantly invest in transit with dedicated rights of ways,\npreferably along more important routes than the Central Subway. And if subways\nare too expensive or difficult to build, we need to seriously consider using\nelevated light rail instead. Geary road, for example, would be perfect for an\nel.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.055"
    },
    {
        "id": 20826840,
        "hacker": "ummonk",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 201,
        "comment": " _> Power efficiency / performance-per-Watt tests were not conducted due to\nthe remote ARM testing. Likewise, there isn't performance-per-dollar metrics\ndue to many variables at play when it comes to factoring in the ARM and POWER9\ncosts._\n\nThat seems to make the benchmarks entirely useless for gauging Power\nperformance for the server market. Not saying it didn’t fall behind its\ncompetitors (I’d be surprised if it didn’t given how much more AMD and ARM\nmakers have been investing in chip development), but these benchmarks don’t\ntell us that.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.019"
    },
    {
        "id": 12200320,
        "hacker": "gwbas1c",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 202,
        "comment": "Interesting! My house is full of multi-way switches that I want to replace\nwith \"on\" and \"off\" buttons. Whenever I look at fancy electronic switches,\nthey are expensive and the reviews indicate that they are very unreliable.\n\nPerhaps I should just find some time to make my own on and off buttons?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.255"
    },
    {
        "id": 11971850,
        "hacker": "gwbas1c",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 202,
        "comment": "Maybe things would make more sense to if EU countries went to the olympics\nunder a single flag? It's not like American athletes compete under the flag of\ntheir state.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.143"
    },
    {
        "id": 16162864,
        "hacker": "gwbas1c",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 202,
        "comment": "I used to put fake passwords on stickies on my monitor just to see if anyone\nwould notice.\n\nNo one did.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 4693043,
        "hacker": "unreal37",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 203,
        "comment": "Pagely tried to help him. Tried really hard. WPEngine didn't even try - their\ncust support people just read from the same script over and over. And then\ncharged him $500 for support.\n\nIf they can't support customers like him, they shouldn't charge him $500 for\nthe time it takes to determine that.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.146"
    },
    {
        "id": 3879377,
        "hacker": "unreal37",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 203,
        "comment": "Wow, that's a lot of generalizations in one comment.\n\nFirst, yes, if you're the type who wants to start a YC-funded startup...\nyou're going to skip college and do that. That's a small, small percentage of\nthe number of CS grads though - say 1%. 1 in 100 young people interested in\nComputer Science will found a startup in the United States.\n\nIf you think its the \"majority\" that do that, you have to get out of San\nFrancisco and visit a place like Florida.\n\nBut that still leaves 99% who would love to go to college, get a degree, and\nget a good job doing interesting things. And even if they get a CS degree,\nthey may not even go into programming after college. That happens quite a bit.\n\nI think what this move portends is that Universities can no longer fund\nresearch. They get a shrinking amount of money, and they have to focus on\nteaching.\n\nBy the way, the fundamentals of programming do NOT change all that much. You\nknow what Android runs? Java. You know when Java was invented? 1994. Do you\nknow how long it takes to learn Android or iPhone programming if you have a\nsolid understanding of Object Oriented programming? Days. So a 3 year degree\nin CompSci still has a lot of relevance and value.\n\nUnless your dream is to start a startup, in which case, go do that.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.173"
    },
    {
        "id": 16267555,
        "hacker": "unreal37",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 203,
        "comment": "But anyone who played the game more than a few hours would know that the time\nonly increments in multiples of 3.\n\nAnd this same gamer lied about other games with scores that are impossible to\nget.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.127"
    },
    {
        "id": 7531438,
        "hacker": "unreal37",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 203,
        "comment": "Perhaps he grows marijuana out of his house, and the police tipped off his\nlandlord. That could break the lease without missing a payment.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 9307027,
        "hacker": "unreal37",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 203,
        "comment": "I am also suspicious of the claim that a fixed salt+password hash scheme is\n\"just as insecure\" as a no-salt password hash scheme. The salt (unknown to the\nattacker) has to add at least a few order of magnitudes more security just by\nturning \"password123\" into \"somesalt65634734password123\" right?\n\nJust from the added password length alone it has to be \"way more\" secure,\nright? Would love some professional crypto opinion on this.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.131"
    },
    {
        "id": 14397374,
        "hacker": "cstejerean",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 204,
        "comment": "That's highly unlikely for most places in the world. What is often required is\nadditional screening at or near the gate to enforce US specific rules (for\nexample liquids in carry-ons). But that's usually not US staff and US\nequipment but rather extra staff enforcing US specific rules (the same way the\nlaptop ban is currently enforced in Dubai for example).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 190093,
        "hacker": "cstejerean",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 204,
        "comment": "I agree this was Debian's fault, and there really is no excuse, but I found it\namazing that there was essentially no way to contact the core OpenSSL team.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.208"
    },
    {
        "id": 18358364,
        "hacker": "cstejerean",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 204,
        "comment": "What's terrible about it? It's the only way I've consumed HBO shows since the\nday it came out (and the reason why I instantly dropped my cable subscription\nas soon as standalone HBO became an option with HBO Now).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.333"
    },
    {
        "id": 8367150,
        "hacker": "marincounty",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 205,
        "comment": "They are just fancy jump hour watches? Or, am I missing something?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 8045919,
        "hacker": "marincounty",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 205,
        "comment": "I still think about FB spending 3 billion on that app?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6593324,
        "hacker": "marincounty",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 205,
        "comment": "Why do they continue to let resellers sell clones, or what I have seen is\ncounterfit times, or blatant misrepresentation? Alfa wifi adapter by DBOROTH?\n\nIt's a good company, but I have seen them start to slip. I still buy from\nthem, but I don't just click like I used to.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 11153491,
        "hacker": "robert_foss",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 206,
        "comment": "If you're looking for improved TLS support, have a peek at esp-open-rtos[1],\nwhich is a re-implementation of the Espressif provided rtos sdk and is aiming\nto be fully open source. It ships with the mbed TLS implementation, which\nsupports TLS 1.2.\n\n[1] https://github.com/SuperHouse/esp-open-rtos\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14533633,
        "hacker": "robert_foss",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 206,
        "comment": "Author here, feel free to ask me things.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 15763772,
        "hacker": "robert_foss",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 206,
        "comment": "Sorry, which arguments are fear-mongering?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 19084057,
        "hacker": "netheril96",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 207,
        "comment": "> but not that it’s a list of ints\n\nPython type annotations do support such use case: List[int].\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14623828,
        "hacker": "netheril96",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 207,
        "comment": "And then Google gets inundated from angry customers who forget their password\nor key for the encryption of their emails.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 18739077,
        "hacker": "netheril96",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 207,
        "comment": "As a Googler I am very satisfied with Blaze (the internal version of Bazel) at\nwork. But I just don't want to manage such a complex beast for my own personal\nprojects. Besides the large amount of dependencies to install for a build\ntool, it demands me to manually rewrite the build script for almost all third\nparty libraries. At Google someone has most likely done that for me, but\noutside it, I have to do it myself.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.151"
    },
    {
        "id": 13863852,
        "hacker": "chx",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 208,
        "comment": "> tussling about what obvious documents might mean if you try hard to\n> misinterpet them,\n\nIn this case, it really sees this is cut high and dry. We will see but this\nreally looks bad.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.101"
    },
    {
        "id": 10299987,
        "hacker": "chx",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 208,
        "comment": "Honestly, the car itself should be offline. Right now it seems easier to\ncreate a self driving car than secure software.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.429"
    },
    {
        "id": 14944708,
        "hacker": "chx",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 208,
        "comment": "Is there a number which can be written in base 2,3,4,5,6 using only 0 and 1?\n\nWhat's mind blowing here is that if you ask for base 2, 3, 4 the answers are\ntrivial but for bases 2,3,4,5 somehow you get 82000 and we do not know whether\nthere is another and for 6 it's unknown.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.425"
    },
    {
        "id": 12426808,
        "hacker": "amyjess",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 209,
        "comment": "> Downside is that I have no clue how to market it, and I hate writing\n> documentation, so there's only a few people using it.\n\nYou could always write up a quick demo program (something anyone can just\nclone, compile, and execute), throw in a few example files, and submit your\nrepository as a Show HN. That might get some attention at least.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.194"
    },
    {
        "id": 9489069,
        "hacker": "amyjess",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 209,
        "comment": "I'd argue that the BBS is the earliest form of social media (or _one of_ the\nearliest, at least).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 9998857,
        "hacker": "amyjess",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 209,
        "comment": "During my unemployment spell in 2010-2012, I got lots of recruiters talking to\nme, and I even had some interviews come out of that.\n\nGuess what? The employers were pickier than the recruiters.\n\nI've learned to deeply distrust recruiters: they are known to make up lie\nafter lie just to throw as many names in front of an employer as possible on\nthe off chance one of us gets hired so they can grab their commission. They'll\nask employers to interview blatantly incompetent candidates (including myself:\nI was absolutely not competent for some of the positions recruiters tried to\nget me) just because they're that desperate.\n\nThen, when I was looking for a new job in 2014 (employed, but unhappy at my\nthen-current position), I got innundated with so many recruiters lobbing utter\nshit at me. This time, I could afford to be picky, and I wasn't afraid to say\nto some of the shadier ones, \"never contact me again\". I had multiple\nrecruiters try to offer me a six-month contract in another state, despite my\nprofile on every job site saying both \"unwilling to relocate\" and \"full-time\nonly, no contracts\". I had recruiters try to get me positions that required\ntwice the amount of experience I had in technologies I've never touched. I had\none recruiter repeatedly send me calls and emails for a position I explicitly\ntold them I wanted no part of the first time he contacted me, and he didn't\nstop until I sent an email saying \"please cease and desist from contacting me\nagain, or I will take legal action against both you and your firm\" (I\nshould've also called his firm's HR department, but _c 'est la vie_...).\n\nOh, and now that I'm happily employed at my current employer, I still get\nfrequent calls from recruiters. I legally changed my name (first, middle,\n_and_ last) in June 2014, but most of the recruiters calling me ask for me by\nmy old name, and I'm at a point in my life where even hearing my old name\ncauses me emotional distress.\n\nIn short: recruiters are sleazy, and being contacted by recruiters has no\nbearing on whether or not you'll actually get a job.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.023"
    },
    {
        "id": 13410158,
        "hacker": "amyjess",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 209,
        "comment": "> Did you know that just about every English word that contains the letter\n> combination \"sk\" is from Old Norse? Skin, sky, ski, skill, skid, skull,\n> skip, skirt etc.\n\nAlso, _skirt_ and _shirt_ are doublets. _Skirt_ comes from Old Norse, and\n_shirt_ is native English, and they both come from the same Proto-Germanic\nroot.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.040"
    },
    {
        "id": 14111512,
        "hacker": "amyjess",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 209,
        "comment": "> Maltese is another language that has a surprising amount of Arabic\n> influence. The way they say their numbers is almost exactly the same as\n> Arabic.\n\nMaltese is a lot like English in that it has so many substrata that you have\nto look at it very closely to see where it came from.\n\nMaltese is actually a direct descendant of Arabic, but it has been so heavily\ninfluenced by multiple Indo-European languages that 2/3 of its vocabulary has\nbeen replaced by words from Italian, Sicilian, English, and possibly others.\n\nCompare this with how English is a West Germanic language but it has multiple\nsubstrata from Old Norse, French, and Latin influences.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.103"
    },
    {
        "id": 93956,
        "hacker": "kirubakaran",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 210,
        "comment": "Puthaandu Nal Vaazhthukkal. (Tamil)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3022465,
        "hacker": "kirubakaran",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 210,
        "comment": "I am sorry for your loss, Ed.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 9528850,
        "hacker": "kirubakaran",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 210,
        "comment": "How about Costa Rica? Fast Internet. Good weather. Beautiful country. Friendly\npeople. And they don't even have a military.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.405"
    },
    {
        "id": 1447346,
        "hacker": "veemjeem",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 211,
        "comment": "isn't omegle anonymous chat too?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6803420,
        "hacker": "veemjeem",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 211,
        "comment": "Too late for that, unless they find a 3rd party judging group. There's no way\npeople will think salesforce is being fair on the 2nd round of judging.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.040"
    },
    {
        "id": 7746979,
        "hacker": "veemjeem",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 211,
        "comment": "This must suck for any startup operating out of the EU. Would this mean that\nanyone can request anything to be removed from the internet if the company\noperates out of the EU? It's hard to determine if a given piece of information\nis \"private\" or not. This would make it nearly impossible to run any kind of\nweb startup from the EU.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.134"
    },
    {
        "id": 17890157,
        "hacker": "gnulinux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 212,
        "comment": "Website is cancer on mobile. Using Materialistic HN APP on Android.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18258034,
        "hacker": "gnulinux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 212,
        "comment": "I think it would give a constant time advantage. If humanity operates on\nO(f(t)) in that case we would operate on O(C f(t)). That is, as opposed,\nimprovements that change the model itself (i.e. f) such as increased\nproductivity, automation, cultural shifts etc...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.033"
    },
    {
        "id": 17892004,
        "hacker": "gnulinux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 212,
        "comment": "I think this is a cultural thing. I grew up somewhere around Europe and random\npeople talking to me on the street would be a big nono, I would run for my\nlife; would definitely at least give a weird look and increase my speed. When\nI moved into the Bay Area for undergrad I saw this is completely normal here.\nSo, I started talking to randoms too, and it usually feels very much when you\nfeel lonely and at the supermarket and some dude asks about what you're\ncooking tonight.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.127"
    },
    {
        "id": 14013946,
        "hacker": "tstactplsignore",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 213,
        "comment": "Lol, I just realized you were that guy who denies CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing\nreally works. It may be against the rules, but I _just have_ to tell you that\nyou are an insufferable idiot who brings down the quality of discourse on this\nsite with your bizarro pseudoscience nonsense.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.011"
    },
    {
        "id": 16109333,
        "hacker": "tstactplsignore",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 213,
        "comment": ">Bitcoin's main purpose is and always was to have an alternative to the\nfinancial system, crippling regulations, government control and taxes.\n\nDoes bitcoin really do any of those things? Right now, btc core is not an\nalternative to cash- a problem that maybe will be fixed in time, but currently\nonly seems to be getting worse. If bitcoin really did take off as a global\ncurrency, the IRS would audit unreported bitcoin transactions- and it'd have\nyour financial records because the corporations and individuals you interact\nact with would cooperate, and it'd only need a few to start to deanonymize\nyou. It seems like the blockchain would almost make the tax job easier,\nbecause all transactions are public unless people move from bitcoin to a\nzerocoin model. Even then, the IRS would pursue those who didn't report and\nhave transaction information from vendors to work to identify fraud.\n\nSo, bitcoin doesn't seem like an alternative to taxes. Also have no idea what\nit has to do with most government regulation. And, is it really an alternative\nto the financial system? Yes, people can use bitcoin instead of a checkings or\nsavings account- but still need to use traditional services to invest in the\nmarket, and the financial system will continue humming along making more money\nfrom money and making gobs of money profiting off everyone else's market\ninefficiency whether it's working in usd or btc.\n\nSo, what are we left with? It seems like core btc is only an alternative to a\nspeculative investment in something that the federal reserve cannot print. And\nbelieve it or not, the vast majority of this country either doesn't care about\nquantitative easing, or believes in basic macroeconomics. Core right now seems\nto just be a LARP fantasy for libertarians convinced that \"this time we can\nfinally get rid of the evil Fed and their evil money printing\". It'll never\nhappen, and if it does offfer any kind of freedom, it's the freedom to go back\nto pre-fiat boom and bust cycles of economic hell detached from modern\nmacroeconomic theory.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.027"
    },
    {
        "id": 12881355,
        "hacker": "tstactplsignore",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 213,
        "comment": "I'm still skeptical- I doubt a single T-cell can have anything but a ever so\nslight statistical inpact on the phenotype of an entire organism, and there is\nno selective process to keep that mutation around, so it cannot last long in\nthe body, either.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.131"
    },
    {
        "id": 19929947,
        "hacker": "781",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 214,
        "comment": "Maybe in the countryside. Go to any West EU capital and you'll see planty of\nniqabs and burqas.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20021163,
        "hacker": "781",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 214,
        "comment": "You are reading too much into the article.\n\nThe EU will never officially name this \"EU English\". They will just name it\n\"English\", and at most they might point to a \"guide\" of what some commonly\nused phrases which differ from British English mean.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.011"
    },
    {
        "id": 19942375,
        "hacker": "781",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 214,
        "comment": "Eddie Murphy is black. Like Kevin Hart is too. GLAAD and the left are very\ncareful in calling out homophobic views of black people, and instead of\ncalling for their resignation or \"cancelation\" as they would for a white\nperson, they are instead demanding for \"this to be a teachable moment\"\n\n> _GLAAD: Kevin Hart ‘Shouldn’t Have Stepped Down’ as Oscars Host, but Used\n> Gig to Bring Unity_\n\nhttps://www.indiewire.com/2018/12/glaad-kevin-hart-oscars-ho...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.103"
    },
    {
        "id": 19340116,
        "hacker": "781",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 214,
        "comment": "> He was interviewed by a younger engineer who told him, “I’m always surprised\n> when older programmers keep up on technology.”\n\nAs someone relatively old, I've been in a lot of developer interviews. I also\nnoticed that older programmers tend to not be as up to date in newer\ntechnologies or ways of doing things.\n\nI don't think it's strictly limited to technology. How many 50-year old do you\nknow who listen to trap music? Or approve of the way teens dress these days?\n\nIt's just the classic \"older people tend to be more conservative\" fact. At\nsome point most people get stuck in the things the were doing/liking when they\nwere younger. The hate new music, they dismiss newer technologies (to open a\nrats nest: Electron anyone?)\n\nI'm sure I'll get comments like \"I'm 18 and I hate trap music and Electron\".\nThat's not the point, I'm talking about distributions not individual cases.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.075"
    },
    {
        "id": 19789443,
        "hacker": "781",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 214,
        "comment": "Still won't work, you need to declare that variable as global, otherwise you\njust create a local variable and set it to false.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 6890497,
        "hacker": "Filligree",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 215,
        "comment": "There isn't. The page looks very much like an ad, probably for a book; I\nwouldn't bother.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.260"
    },
    {
        "id": 5238363,
        "hacker": "Filligree",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 215,
        "comment": "Cured djungarian hamsters, I believe.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 17982211,
        "hacker": "Filligree",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 215,
        "comment": "Well, of course they don't. How would you even begin to build a simulator for\nsomething like that?\n\nCommunications overhead between the nodes is bad enough as it is.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.350"
    },
    {
        "id": 4455027,
        "hacker": "peterwwillis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 216,
        "comment": "The link he gave is a custom multiplexing daemon that handles those cases. A\ntimeout value is used to connect to the SSH daemon if the server hasn't\nreceived anything from the client.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3321279,
        "hacker": "peterwwillis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 216,
        "comment": "You have a weird way of reading. I don't see where I said that. Can you quote\nit for me?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 3587044,
        "hacker": "peterwwillis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 216,
        "comment": "She could bang him with her fist too. That would be from behind, and\ncompletely feasible with human anatomy. Clearly you haven't been on the\ninternet very long. I can probably find you video evidence in about 20\nminutes...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.053"
    },
    {
        "id": 3696666,
        "hacker": "peterwwillis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 216,
        "comment": "Is this a troll? Fuck it, i'll answer it anyway.\n\nFirst.\n\nEvil by definition is:\n\n    \n    \n      6. that which is evil; evil quality, intention, or conduct: to choose the lesser of two evils.\n      7. the force in nature that governs and gives rise to wickedness and sin.\n      8. the wicked or immoral part of someone or something: The evil in his nature has destroyed the good.\n      9. harm; mischief; misfortune: to wish one evil.\n      10. anything causing injury or harm: Tobacco is considered by some to be an evil. \n    \n\n(http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/evil)\n\nTherefore, if you want to 'do evil' you can harm, cause mischief, cause\nmisfortune, cause injury or harm, etc etc etc. So that's what \"you can do\nevil\" means.\n\nSecond.\n\nEvil is not by definition, \"doing something you shouldn't do,\" as evidenced in\nthe definition in the URL linked above. Evil is just bad. Sometimes it might\nbe necessary to do evil. The bible has innocent god-fearing people do evil all\nthe god-damn time - but it's something they do In The Name Of The Lord.\n\nThird.\n\nWhy the hell are you telling me this? I never said anyone should or should not\n'ban evil', I was merely stating that the potential for good or evil in a\npublic domain-licensed piece of software like SQLite can't be compared to an\nOpen Source-licensed product because the public domain is inherently more evil\nthan Open Source.\n\nFourth.\n\n'Banning evil' is not even comparable, to saying that breaking a law is\nillegal. Saying that breaking a law is illegal is a truism. Banning evil is a\nsometimes-necessary act in order to enforce a punishment for doing evil, which\nis the whole basis for a system of laws and penalties. You have to define what\nevil is and define a punishment for varying degrees of evil. Without\nspecifically defining such laws you have a kind of tribal unspoken law which\nis quite subjective and not compatible with things like copyright law or\nsoftware licenses.\n\nDoes that clear things up?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.423"
    },
    {
        "id": 3938869,
        "hacker": "peterwwillis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 216,
        "comment": "You know, it's really easy to build a car.\n\nAll you need is wheels, brakes, a frame, a power source, a transmission, some\nfuel, and some crap to connect the power to the transmission to the wheels and\nthe wheels to the frame. And a seat. Oh, and a steering wheel. Boom. Done.\n\nYou can hand-build a car by yourself over a couple days. I mean sure, the\nengine, transmission, frame, wheels, tires, seat, gas tank, carburetor,\nbrakes, etc are all manufactured by hundreds of people and dozens of companies\nto get you to that point. But basically, you decide what components to use and\nhow to put them together. It takes you a relatively minute amount of time to\nassemble them and it's much easier than trying to manufacture all the parts\nyourself.\n\nSomehow, after building cars for over 200 years, both hobbyists and huge\ncorporations find new ways to build them (and seem to enjoy themselves). They\neven come out with new ones every couple years and keep finding people to buy\nthem. You'd think the general public would wise up to the fact that it's all\nthe same thing over and over and demand our jetson cars already.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.132"
    },
    {
        "id": 5416651,
        "hacker": "peterwwillis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 216,
        "comment": "I'm done with people making a big deal about new technology when old\ntechnology does the job better. People like this guy are _spending their\nlives_ trying to figure out how to replace perfectly good native applications\nwith ones that live inside web browsers. It's depressing.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.139"
    },
    {
        "id": 9279117,
        "hacker": "peterwwillis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 216,
        "comment": "Of course levels of security exist. And OE is not on the spectrum of levels of\nsecurity, because it is not a secure connection:\nhttp://www.techopedia.com/definition/13266/secure-connection\n\nIt's an arms race. If I have sensitive data, you install a tap to capture it.\nIf I begin obscuring the data from you rtap, you begin injecting traffic to\nunobscure it.\n\nIf someone is trying to steal your data, they will not stop trying to steal it\njust because you applied ROT13 to it. Why do you think someone would just give\nup just because they now need to use an active attack? Active attacks are\n_trivial_ once a tap is in place. We're not talking NSA research projects\nhere; this shit has been going on since World War II. If they have a means to\nexploit your data, they will use it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.113"
    },
    {
        "id": 17040794,
        "hacker": "peterwwillis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 216,
        "comment": "Yikes, this article is so myopic. They treat large \"ISPs\" as if they are a\nsingle independent entity. The largest ones are owned and operated by gigantic\ncorporate interests, and their sales figures are part of a broader plan, and\nthus so is pricing. The profits of \"EPB Fiber Optics\" don't go towards paying\nfor content rights worth billions of dollars a year.\n\nThe larger the network, the more expensive it costs to maintain and upgrade.\nOf course a tiny regional co-op ISP doesn't cost much to run. They don't have\n25 million customers in 21 states, or 145,000 miles of fiber in 39 states.\n\nI mean, jesus, this article goes all over the place. It's saying provisioning\nisn't expensive, and suggests that deployment cost is lowered by changing\nbuilding codes to require conduit. How does that affect the 91 million homes\nthat already exist?\n\nThe article states that net neutrality _\" prohibits [ISPs] from charging\nunjustified fees on Internet services\"_. No, it doesn't. They can charge\nwhatever they want for their services. They _will_ increase the price of\ninternet services whether or not net neutrality exists, because it is not\ngetting any cheaper to run a giant ISP that is responsible to the shareholders\nof a media conglomerate.\n\nIf the author really thinks the _only_ reason big ISPs charge high fees is\nbecause they're mean and greedy, they really are going to lose this fight,\nmainly from a lack of critical thinking skills.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.019"
    },
    {
        "id": 17491757,
        "hacker": "peterwwillis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 216,
        "comment": "This isn't true for the SL500 at all, and I would venture to say not for\nperformance cars in general. The SL500 is a pig at nearly 4,000lbs and has way\ntoo much torque and horsepower, and as a result, oversized parts which aren't\nmade for normal driving. As the \"performance\" of the car ramps up, so does the\ndifficulty of handling the car. A possible exception to this rule is AWD cars.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.142"
    },
    {
        "id": 19839206,
        "hacker": "peterwwillis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 216,
        "comment": "I really wish people would stop publishing useful information as tweets. It's\nlike publishing a research addendum on fortune cookie papers. Besides it being\nhard to read, it's easy to lose.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.160"
    },
    {
        "id": 20023627,
        "hacker": "peterwwillis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 216,
        "comment": "> especially when the people living outside refuse the help available and\n> refuse treatment for their addiction and/or mental illness, so 'helping'\n> them would require stripping them of their rights and 'helping' them by\n> force.\n\nThis is a stereotype, and not at all reflective of the overall cases of\nhomelessness throughout America.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.060"
    },
    {
        "id": 20978546,
        "hacker": "peterwwillis",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 216,
        "comment": "One of them is Hotel California, the other is \"I would like to see my mother\nagain and have her meet my children, but she isn't allowed in the country,\" or\n\"my brother is stuck in a war-torn country and I can't get him out.\" It's not\njust an inconvenience, it's families that are forcibly separated for totally\nbullshit reasons. (In addition it's \"I can't take a job in the US\", \"I can't\nsupport my family members in time of crisis\", and so on)\n\nHere: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/01/world/americas/travel-ban...\n\n    \n    \n      - The number of people who fall under the ban exceeds 135 million\n      - The majority are in the five Muslim-majority nations, led by Iran, with a population of more than 80 million\n    \n\n_\" The executive order \"affects the lives and families\" of at least 187 Google\nemployees\"_ (https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/williamalden/nearly-200...)\n\nhttps://www.americanprogress.org/issues/race/news/2017/02/09...\n\n _\" Dr. Suha Abushamma, 26, is an internal medicine resident at the Cleveland\nClinic. Although she had an H-1B visa for workers in “specialty occupations,”\nwhich should allow her to enter, live, and work in the United States,\nAbushamma was not permitted to enter the country. Abushamma holds a passport\nfrom Sudan, which is one of the banned nations.\"_\n\n _\" Sahar Algonaimi, 60, was detained for five hours at Chicago O’Hare\nInternational Airport following the issuance of the executive order.\nAlgonaimi, a Syrian national, had traveled to the United States from Saudi\nArabia to visit her 76-year-old mother who is recovering from surgery for\nbreast cancer. Although she held a U.S. visa and had planned to stay in the\ncountry for a week, she was she was forced to board a flight to the United\nArab Emirates instead of being allowed to clear customs.\"_\n\n _\" “I needed someone to be with me here,” Ulayyet said through tears at the\nhospital. “How am I going to teach my kids and tell them that this is a free\ncountry? How can we tell my kids that we have to take care of each other?”\"_\n\nYou don't think these sound similar to the OP?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.079"
    },
    {
        "id": 7533339,
        "hacker": "wglb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 217,
        "comment": "So let's try an experiment to see what happens:\nhttps://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=7532584\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7139956,
        "hacker": "wglb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 217,
        "comment": "This should be one of the required units of study in Floating Point School.\n\nQuick--why would you sort an array of floating point numbers before adding\nthem up? And in which order?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3283940,
        "hacker": "wglb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 217,
        "comment": "Inside your iPod nano, or any other device with a computer chip is a radio\ntransmitter. Inside the cockpit are many radio receivers, some of which are\npretty critical to the proper flight of the airplane. Your radio transmitter,\nand radio transmitters being run by other passengers, mix and mingle their\nsignals, producing an unpredictable effect on these key cockpit receivers.\n\nThe probability that this happens is not zero or low, but very high.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.054"
    },
    {
        "id": 18716708,
        "hacker": "wglb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 217,
        "comment": "That is the purpose of the \"flag\" link on stories.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 8787101,
        "hacker": "wglb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 217,
        "comment": "I think it is a bad and misguided post that doesn't understand the success\nthat Patrick has.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 11692304,
        "hacker": "soared",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 218,
        "comment": "Man that slow refresh rate would kill me.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 12190346,
        "hacker": "soared",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 218,
        "comment": "Awesome build! If you are looking for some ideas for new widgets my blog would\ndefinitely spark some ideas. Mine ran windows 10, so I used a program called\n'rainmeter' that just adds widgets to your desktop. I found music visualizers,\ncandles, gifs, and google chrome experiments really cool.\n\n[1] innate.cc\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.372"
    },
    {
        "id": 21250054,
        "hacker": "soared",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 218,
        "comment": "Quote pulled for critical context - The schools want everyone involved in an\nextracurricular activity. This solves tons of issues - bad home life, gangs,\nloneliness/depression, etc.\n\n> Finding a niche for all students to participate in an extracurricular\n> activity is one of the DISD’s key goals. Trustees made extracurricular\n> participation a major priority in 2017, setting a districtwide goal of 78%\n> participation by the 2021-22 school year.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.159"
    },
    {
        "id": 5587225,
        "hacker": "losethos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 219,
        "comment": "Who's Your favorite king, God?\n\nGod says...\n\nsalvation.\n\n13:6 I will sing unto the LORD, because he hath dealt bountifully with me.\n\n14:1 The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God. They are corrupt, they\nhave done abominable works, there is none that doeth good.\n\n14:2 The LORD looked down from heaven upon the children of men, to see if\nthere were any that did understand, and seek God.\n\n14:3 They are all gone aside, they are all together become filthy: there is\nnone that doeth good, no, not one.\n\n14:4 Have all the workers of iniquity no knowledge? who eat up my people as\nthey eat bread, and call not upon the LORD.\n\n\\----\n\nMutiny on the Bounty\n\n\\----\n\nGod, does Hawkings impress You more? Who?\n\nGod says...\n\nnot drunken, as ye suppose, seeing it is but the third hour of the day.\n\n2:16 But this is that which was spoken by the prophet Joel; 2:17 And it shall\ncome to pass in the last days, saith God, I will pour out of my Spirit upon\nall flesh: and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men\nshall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams: 2:18 And on my\nservants and on my handmaidens I will pour out in those days of my Spirit; and\nthey shall prophesy: 2:19 And I will shew wonders in heaven above, and signs\nin the earth beneath; blood, and fire, and vapour of smoke: 2:20 The sun shall\nbe turned into darkness, and the moon into blood, before the great and notable\nday of the Lord come: 2:21 And it shall come to pass, that whosoever shall\ncall on the name of the Lord shall be saved.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.175"
    },
    {
        "id": 2819719,
        "hacker": "losethos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 219,
        "comment": "Somehow, I don't think Apple is in the sights of the liberals who hate\ncorporations.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.800"
    },
    {
        "id": 5384247,
        "hacker": "losethos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 219,
        "comment": "TempleOS has no networking. God is God--ouija board, basically.\n\nGod says... C:\\TAD\\Text\\PLATO.TXT\n\nand will be administered in a spirit unlike that of other States, in which men\nfight with one another about shadows only and are distracted in the struggle\nfor power, which in their eyes is a great good. Whereas the truth is that the\nState in which the rulers are most reluctant to govern is always the best and\nmost quietly governed, and the State in which they are most eager, the worst.\n\nQuite true, he replied.\n\nAnd will our pupils, when they hear this, refuse to take their turn at the\ntoils o\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.293"
    },
    {
        "id": 5784599,
        "hacker": "losethos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 219,
        "comment": "This is retarded.\n\nPeople talk about programming instead of doing it. Best advice is to do it and\ndo it more. You learn.\n\nI hate all the gurus. They want to explain how to take a shit.\n\nWhy don't you tell your boss to make the problem simpler so you can use one or\ntwo arguments.\n\n\\----\n\nGod says...\n\n2:25 The children of Kirjatharim, Chephirah, and Beeroth, seven hundred and\nforty and three.\n\n2:26 The children of Ramah and Gaba, six hundred twenty and one.\n\n2:27 The men of Michmas, an hundred twenty and two.\n\n2:28 The men of Bethel and Ai, two hundred twenty and three.\n\n2:29 The children of Nebo, fifty and two.\n\n2:30 The children of Magbish, an hundred fifty and six.\n\n2:31 The children of the other Elam, a thousand two hundred fifty and four.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.071"
    },
    {
        "id": 6432326,
        "hacker": "losethos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 219,
        "comment": "I have God. Mine will last 1,000 years.\n\nGod says... store acceptable emptinesses elevated patience litigation\ndiligently threats roses_are_red moon interest refresh self-confidence meant\nsociety faces presented outrages sumptuously conceive right-doing exuberance\nclasp solemnise exultation swine Somalia royalties perversion approved\nintermitting Enricher gentle exquisitely Mothers asterisk tamer deepness woot\ngrossness plenty Guinea barked as_a_matter_of_fact females deem consulting FBI\nsubmitting forethink plant hung dispraise Singapore chiefest idleness\nbuildings Guardian Already Catholics broughtest Only gates goest lucre garb\nVermont presuming startles consider completely Readable expose Heaven shame\ninebriated Mexico\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.260"
    },
    {
        "id": 20600232,
        "hacker": "rv-de",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 220,
        "comment": "Both in mathematics as well as in colloquial language a term's definition must\nbe such that it is useful. The term \"normal\" is grammatically an attribute\n(something is normal or is not normal). If \"normal\" is defined such that no\nobject can be called \"normal\" \\- then the the term \"normal\" is useless.\n\nThis way of thinking about language is not just logical and economical but\nalso conforming with a friendly approach on communication. Of course, this is\nsomething unattractive to many people who celebrate their incredible and\nsuperior intelligence for the purpose of grandstanding. And I fear this\nattitude is relatively more normal on HN.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.231"
    },
    {
        "id": 18346080,
        "hacker": "rv-de",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 220,
        "comment": "I think it depends on your definition of boredom. What does feeling bored mean\nto you?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.406"
    },
    {
        "id": 19338169,
        "hacker": "rv-de",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 220,
        "comment": "I'm currently traveling through the UK.\n\nI went from Hamburg to London via Antwerp by blablacar.\n\nI so far stayed at two places through couchsurfing.\n\nand I'm now heading towards my third Airbnb place.\n\nsharing economy is certainly not a scam.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.002"
    },
    {
        "id": 20568327,
        "hacker": "rv-de",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 220,
        "comment": "Maybe a good moment to commemorate the infamous RedTubeGate from 2013 in\nGermany:\n\nA couple lawyers and fishy business men launch an ad campaign on RedTube.\nThrough that advertisement they collected IP addresses of visitors.\n\nBefore launching that campaign they allegedly bought the rights for three\ncheap porn flicks.\n\nNow they also claim that they have some miraculous software which allows them\nto track who has been watching those flicks on RedTube. They even get a\ntotally unclear blueprint for that software officially certified by a\nsurveyor. [4]\n\nThen they appeal to a court in Cologne for the real world addresses\ncorresponding to the IP addresses arguing they can prove those poor schmocks\nwatched their illegally uploaded crap flicks.\n\nSuddenly thousands of people receive letters threatening legal action if they\ndo not agree on paying a fee of 250 Euro. Many people comply out of fear for\ntheir reputation and just pay.\n\n1: https://web.archive.org/web/20140822000304/http://www.wbs-la...\n\n2: https://www.joyofdata.de/blog/tool-visualization-connections...\n\n3: https://web.archive.org/web/20140911214044/http://www.cracka...\n\n4: https://www.abmahnhelfer.de/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/EV.pd...\n\n(many of the original sources have been deleted and are only available through\narchive.org)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.063"
    },
    {
        "id": 6387744,
        "hacker": "kyro",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 221,
        "comment": "In-app payments accounted for 76% of total revenue in the App Store.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 164953,
        "hacker": "kyro",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 221,
        "comment": "Dugg for 'Ask Reddit.'\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 872222,
        "hacker": "kyro",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 221,
        "comment": "I'm always getting stuck on the Courier New vs. Helvetica Neue ones.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.136"
    },
    {
        "id": 7361823,
        "hacker": "kyro",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 221,
        "comment": "$50 says no more than 0.5% of users will leave a Facebook-owned Whatsapp for\nprivacy concerns. People do not care, at all.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 17051435,
        "hacker": "Can_Not",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 222,
        "comment": "> What would \"improving their central planning\" mean? Force people to study\n> certain subjects? Force people to teach for free?\n\nThat's an unfair misrepresentation of central planning, using the phrase\n\"force people to\" to imply some kind of slavery unique to central planning.\nMaybe the Chinese government will choose to use it's state monopoly on\nviolence to coerce people into unwanted job, but it's not like you don't need\na garbage crew in both economic systems. Central planning can be used to make\nfunding available for high priority items. You can technically force people at\ngunpoint into specific degree paths and occupations, but more likely you'll\nmake the jobs exist and make sure potential engineers aren't trapped at the\nbottom of the economy.\n\n> Yes, it is. That means that these aren't simply forces that can be wished\n> away by a central government with an agenda. They are things that come about\n> naturally.\n\nThere are tons of examples in science where designed and engineered systems\noutperform natural systems. No amount of \"natural horses\" can compete with\nmodern trains, space shuttles, bus systems, race cars, etc.. And there are\nthings science hasn't discovered how to optimize yet, so we do end up still\nusing horses from time to time, despite cars being ubiquitous in modern\nsociety.\n\n> \"Good central planning\" is an oxymoron if you ask me. In order to guarantee\n> that people have jobs, you have to take away people's free will to make sure\n> they can perform the functions you as a central planner desire. They cannot\n> study what they want, you will essentially have to plan people's entire\n> lives for them. This is all assuming that people are interchangeable cogs\n> and you are able to predict that people will be good at the tasks you wish\n> for them to perform.\n\nThis is a pretty flawed argument against central planning. You do not have to\nplan people's entire lives. Outside of religion and perhaps some SciFi novel\nabout AI, I've never heard of any central planning theories having a plan for\npeople's entire lives. What happens is that people naturally pick what they\nwant to do, and some people don't really pick anything coherent. You make\nplans based on where you currently are, what resources you estimate you will\nhave next year, and where you are looking to go. You iterate each planning\ncycle based on successes and failures. This is not much different than how\nlarge corporations do their planning. Most notable difference is that\n\"success\" will be measured in something much more valuable to society than\nprivate profits. Another aspect of a good central plan is that you can't plan\nfor everything. There are people who are naturally motivated to do something\nuseful, so it may be optimal to give them a team and see if future planning\ncycles can benefit from the team's output.\n\nThe alternative to this is that you have writers and artists wasting their\ntalents serving coffee at starbucks. You have people who didn't study what\nthey want because only STEM jobs are going to be above minimum wage for sure\nin the next 20 years. You have a system that looks at the bottom half of the\neconomy and says \"I have no plan for you.\". How many teams are building\nredundant clones of candy crush? How many teams are seeking to innovate for\nthe sake of seeking new rents rather than for innovation itself? How many\nteams are focusing on getting consumers to buy fake/misleading products? How\nmany teams are trying to market dangerous, unhealthy, and/or addictive high\nmargin items to children? How many \"free markets\" have rational actors that\ndepend on information asymmetry for the majority of their consensual\narrangements? These issues are rampant epidemics under capitalism.\nEntrepreneurs are a slave to profit motives and the people are not free. Only\nthe free market is free.\n\n> Point being, I think it is pretty safe to say that private R&D spending\n> dwarfs public spending. The large corporations that are often maligned are\n> the best institutions to do risky R&D as they have lots of resources and\n> experience in their problem domain. Of course they don't always do so, but\n> if they don't a competitor will.\n\nLooking at your sources, $200 billion in private R&D is less than the 1.1\ntrillion in public spending. I don't think it would be accurate or meaningful\nto say there is a significant difference.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.165"
    },
    {
        "id": 20177588,
        "hacker": "Can_Not",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 222,
        "comment": "Morality is not defined by the law, there are lots of moral activities that\nare illegal, and there are lots of immoral activities being carried out by the\nlaw.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 15058844,
        "hacker": "Can_Not",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 222,
        "comment": "Didn't swift only target iOS devices? Then you have to write an entire second\napplication?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 2104825,
        "hacker": "patrickgzill",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 223,
        "comment": "All you are buying is a paper promise of yuan.\n\nUS dollars, devalued as they are, are still the reserve currency of the world\nand most importantly, oil is still denominated in USD.\n\nSo basically they can print up as many yuan as they can sell, and exchange\npaper with pretty pictures on it, for oil and other commodities they can\nactually use.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.254"
    },
    {
        "id": 4716035,
        "hacker": "patrickgzill",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 223,
        "comment": "We are complimenting companies for not having redundant setups but telling us\nabout it, when they have been claiming all along, that they have redundant\nsetups?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 3842658,
        "hacker": "patrickgzill",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 223,
        "comment": "For one, KVM virtualization does not run on Illumos, nor Solaris.\n\nSecond, Oracle is encumbering Solaris with a not-nice license. I haven't\nfollowed the latest developments because I no longer care, since I will never\nuse a non-free OS.\n\nWhether you meant to ask, \"Why Illumos over Solaris\" or \"Why SmartOS or OmniOS\nover Illumos?\" I think I have answered your question :-)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.333"
    },
    {
        "id": 1749405,
        "hacker": "patrickgzill",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 223,
        "comment": "If you had told random people in the 1950s and 1960s that this was happening,\nyou would have been branded a nutcase.\n\nWhat are the \"nutcases\" telling us now, that we will find out about 50 years\non?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 6852044,
        "hacker": "Houshalter",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 224,
        "comment": "Lastpass doesn't have a password itself?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6997749,
        "hacker": "Houshalter",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 224,
        "comment": "Both are worrying. Overpopulation obviously has problems with dividing up\nnatural resources among more and more people and/or trying to find jobs for\nthem all.\n\nBut too low birth rates mean there won't be enough kids to replace the current\nworkers, and we will have fewer people supporting a larger population of\nretired people (though this might be possible with technology and of course,\nimmigration.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.094"
    },
    {
        "id": 7233241,
        "hacker": "Houshalter",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 224,
        "comment": "Social media buttons are annoying and useless as well as a major privacy\nconcern. Block them with adblock and the filter \"Fanboy's Annoyance List\"\nwhich can be found on this page: https://easylist.adblockplus.org/en/\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.301"
    },
    {
        "id": 7801264,
        "hacker": "Houshalter",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 224,
        "comment": "If an AI can speak it can tell humans why it did what it did. But it's\nimpossible to look through it's brain and see for yourself. To see if it's\ntelling to truth or exaggerating or rationalizing.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.667"
    },
    {
        "id": 8263940,
        "hacker": "Houshalter",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 224,
        "comment": "Only if you are certain there is a correct answer. If there isn't a correct\nanswer, you just cause a paradox. It's also more likely that the machine will\nspontaneously fail, or the creator will get hit by a bus before he can\ncomplete it, etc.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.052"
    },
    {
        "id": 10722181,
        "hacker": "Houshalter",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 224,
        "comment": "The danger of nanotechnology is that it can be built better than biological\nlife. It could outcompete it in it's own environment, or at least different\nenvironments.\n\nSolar panels can collect more energy than photosynthesis. Planes can fly\nfaster than any bird. Guns are far more effective than any animal's weapons.\nSteam engines can run more efficiently than biological digestion. And we can\nget power from fuel sources biology doesn't touch, like fossil fuels or\nnuclear.\n\nWe conquered the macro world before we even invented electricity. Now we are\njust starting to conquer the micro world.\n\nBut AI is far more dangerous. It would take many many decades - perhaps\ncenturies - of work to advance to that level. It's probably possible to build\ngrey goo, it's just not easy or near. However AI could be much closer given\nthe rapid rate of progress.\n\nIf you make an unfriendly AI, you can't just shut it off. It could spread it's\nsource code through the internet. And it won't tell you that it's dangerous.\nIt will pretend to be benevolent until it no longer needs you.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.192"
    },
    {
        "id": 14577688,
        "hacker": "Houshalter",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 224,
        "comment": "And my comment in reply to this nonsense got flagged and downvoted, _3 days\nlater_ , on an already flagged and buried subthread. Wtf. You guys are just\nproving my point.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14878968,
        "hacker": "Houshalter",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 224,
        "comment": "I'm not against moderation at all. But I feel really weird about it when it\ncomes to politics.\n\nI was a moderator on a default subreddit for a year or two. I saw mods censor\neven relatively polite and thought out comments that had the \"wrong\" political\nmessage. In some cases nuking entire threads because they didn't like the\nideas being discussed. This article gives solid examples of this tool\nfiltering comments that happen to discuss Islam or terrorism. Likely the\nperson who trained it had some kind of political bias that this tool is\nreinforcing.\n\nOn the other side of the coin, the vast majority of comments that should be\nremoved aren't targeted by this tool at all. E.g. inane joke comments by\npeople who were adding nothing to the conversation. These aren't \"toxic\" or\nharmful, but they take over and crowd out actual discussion.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.044"
    },
    {
        "id": 14996144,
        "hacker": "Houshalter",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 224,
        "comment": "The best essay I've seen on the subject is here:\nhttp://slatestarcodex.com/2017/08/07/contra-grant-on-exagger... it's a lot\nbetter than the original memo.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.427"
    },
    {
        "id": 1252247,
        "hacker": "adrianwaj",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 225,
        "comment": "headline fails - the new spam\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.182"
    },
    {
        "id": 6182698,
        "hacker": "adrianwaj",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 225,
        "comment": "\"encrypt emails in such a way that they literally did not have access to the\ncontent stored on their own servers\"\n\nhow is that possible? I'm curious to know as to how they achieved that\ntechnically. I mean if the user is reading an email in their browser, then it\nwould've had to have been created on the server first.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.073"
    },
    {
        "id": 6183323,
        "hacker": "adrianwaj",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 225,
        "comment": "I'd take it personally and go after the individuals.. even the lawyers know\nwho is paying them. We're dealing with a set of individuals that are\nharrassing the entrepreneurial community... and have never IPO'ed anything or\nhave any customers to vouch for their character. They may have patents, but no\nproducts, and they are harrassing those creating products and getting\ncustomers. If I got a patent troll on my back, I would find a bunch of their\nother prior targets and get a petition from all our customers, and ..... do\nwhat's right. Maybe obtain some punitive damages. They're not acting in the\nspirit of the law, rather the spirit of the cockroach. One could even conceive\nof a reverse troll, creating a honeypot company to attract the trolls, and\nthen to counterstrike.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.027"
    },
    {
        "id": 7823309,
        "hacker": "buckbova",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 226,
        "comment": "For non-technical folks this is pretty difficult.\n\nThe average person can purchase an off the shelf personal cloud and probably\nget somewhere with storing and accessing files but going beyond that requires\nhelp.\n\nAs a test I set up owncloud and personal email on a digital ocean droplet just\nlast night on their lowest tier. So far so good. But it needs some help on the\nuser friendly aspects, like sharing a photo gallery.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.077"
    },
    {
        "id": 9612927,
        "hacker": "buckbova",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 226,
        "comment": "If you look up the artist you'll note his previous illustrations are mostly\ncrudely drawn comics. I suppose that is the charm.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.433"
    },
    {
        "id": 9695000,
        "hacker": "buckbova",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 226,
        "comment": "> ivory acquired before a worldwide ban in 1989\n\nThis allows those who own ivory, potential many historical, to trade in those\npieces.\n\nHow does this contribute to extinction? Unless there's time travel involved.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.275"
    },
    {
        "id": 21403739,
        "hacker": "jotm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 227,
        "comment": "Yeah, it's impossible to do it perfectly as long as human voices' frequencies\noverlap with instruments, basically.\n\nIt's like asking to recover layers from a PNG/JPG File.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.239"
    },
    {
        "id": 6154452,
        "hacker": "jotm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 227,
        "comment": "I'm not knowledgeable in this area, but isn't Thunderbolt a more direct\ninterface (since it's basically external PCI-E) with less overhead than USB,\nmaking it a better choice for devices requiring low latency (audio interfaces,\ngraphics cards, SSDs, etc.)?\n\nRegardless, I believe _Intel 's_ Thunderbolt is here to stay, along with USB\n3.x...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.156"
    },
    {
        "id": 16360187,
        "hacker": "jotm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 227,
        "comment": "Wow, really smart guys...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.157"
    },
    {
        "id": 20674636,
        "hacker": "jotm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 227,
        "comment": "What do you mean long gone? It's easier than ever.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.181"
    },
    {
        "id": 4714284,
        "hacker": "eco",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 228,
        "comment": "What I like about LTE is the decreased latency (rather than the higher peak\nspeed).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.075"
    },
    {
        "id": 7711505,
        "hacker": "eco",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 228,
        "comment": "Putting on my tinfoil hat it seems like almost all of her recent articles cast\nnegative light on existing large retailers. You'll get shot going to Starbucks\nand Jack in the Box. J.C. Penny still hasn't forked over money for the victims\nof the Bangladesh factory collapse (and neither has Walmart but they don't use\nthat factory so that's a weird thing to mention). You're exploiting fast-food\nworkers by eating there. Hobby Lobby and Chick-fil-A are controlled by\nreligious nutjobs.\n\nNone of these are a problem if you shop at home from, say, Amazon.com.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.031"
    },
    {
        "id": 8604099,
        "hacker": "eco",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 228,
        "comment": "kickme444 refutes onewaystreet. kickme444 is a reddit employee.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3738426,
        "hacker": "eco",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 228,
        "comment": "Sounds neat. I just use my phone.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3272324,
        "hacker": "ggchappell",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 229,
        "comment": "Another question:\n\n _Why_ do you feel it necessary to remain engaged and active across all of the\nmajor social networks?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.009"
    },
    {
        "id": 5715913,
        "hacker": "ggchappell",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 229,
        "comment": "Lovely.\n\nMy findings:\n\nHere is one with a curious counter-clockwise rotation phenomenon:\n\nhttp://wry.me/hacking/Turing-Drawings/#6,5,5,2,0,2,1,0,4,4,2...\n\nAnd a few that take a long time to stabilize and do some interesting things in\nthe meantime:\n\nhttp://www.wry.me/hacking/Turing-Drawings/#3,5,2,4,1,1,1,3,1...\n\nhttp://wry.me/hacking/Turing-Drawings/#4,3,0,2,2,1,2,1,3,2,0...\n\nhttp://www.wry.me/hacking/Turing-Drawings/#3,6,1,3,3,2,1,0,0...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.130"
    },
    {
        "id": 7880452,
        "hacker": "ggchappell",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 229,
        "comment": "The footnotes seem to be missing.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 9248357,
        "hacker": "ptaipale",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 230,
        "comment": "Well, the point about that scandal was that what Apple, Google and others were\ndoing was illegal.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 12517697,
        "hacker": "ptaipale",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 230,
        "comment": "Brits won't be kicking out any Polish plumbers, either. They're people who do\nwork and make business and it will be generally recognized a useful practise\nto allow them to stay.\n\nCurrently, EU citizens don't need a _work or residence permit_ , but if you\nactually get a job and stay longer than that, you will still need to _register\nyour right of residence_. It's not really _that_ different. And believe me,\nexisting rights of residence will not be forfeited in case of Brexit.\n\nShall we make a bet? I'll offer a pint if I'm wrong.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.004"
    },
    {
        "id": 14562986,
        "hacker": "ptaipale",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 230,
        "comment": "However, people on social welfare in Spain hardly can afford a cheap... (ok\nnot sun) holidays in UK and Ireland.\n\nNot to mention Latvia or Bulgaria.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.160"
    },
    {
        "id": 12344863,
        "hacker": "ptaipale",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 230,
        "comment": "I have the same feeling, about both windmills and motorways: they can be very\nbeautiful engineering constructs.\n\nPerhaps it's just that enough is enough, or rather, too much is too much.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.233"
    },
    {
        "id": 3509895,
        "hacker": "unwind",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 231,
        "comment": "Also: http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=3509141.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 1364204,
        "hacker": "unwind",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 231,
        "comment": "I would have thought that a place like MIT ran their on-campus wireless using\nencryption, which should make this kind of sniffing/snooping a bit more\ndifficult.\n\nEven our home wlan is encrypted. Weird. Is this by design?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 17585369,
        "hacker": "unwind",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 231,
        "comment": "Meta/OT: Mods, please fix the missing 'p' in the title. Thanks.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12192284,
        "hacker": "unwind",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 231,
        "comment": "Site seems down. I tried to find an alternative source but didn't come up with\nmuch.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.022"
    },
    {
        "id": 1616919,
        "hacker": "unwind",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 231,
        "comment": "Isn't that, in turn, perhaps because oftentimes donors then get to _name_ the\nbuilding? At least this seems common in the US, but that's just an observation\nfrom the outside.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 4262191,
        "hacker": "unwind",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 231,
        "comment": "My guess would be that it's simply not a color image.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 8679492,
        "hacker": "mattm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 232,
        "comment": "Disagree. It only really works for workers that are actively producing. For\njobs that are reactionary (mainly service jobs where customers come to them\nand they are expected to deal with them) it doesn't really work. You need\nsomeone in the store or answering the phones during certain hours.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.078"
    },
    {
        "id": 7564152,
        "hacker": "mattm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 232,
        "comment": "It was from Hacker News. Someone was attempting to reset my password. I got\nthree of these emails 2 minutes apart each. I wondered if it had to do with\nthe recent heartbleed bug.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 2039622,
        "hacker": "mattm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 232,
        "comment": "I don't know if I agree with this completely. I lived in Nairobi in the summer\nof 2004 and had a real difficult time understanding people for the first\ncouple of weeks.\n\nHowever, the people generally do speak quite slowly with melodic voices and\nemphasized pronunciation.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.130"
    },
    {
        "id": 17553644,
        "hacker": "mattm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 232,
        "comment": "Try signing up again now that you're in the bay area. I think anyone outside\nof their target market gets the closed beta page.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 19046909,
        "hacker": "olliej",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 233,
        "comment": "I assume people with blue ray want to rip at original quality - isn’t that 10s\nof gig per disk? (I have never bought blue ray so have no idea).\n\nFor me the problem was ripping my dvds just took so long, and wasn’t\nautomatable (weirdly my bottom of the line Mac mini struggles with re-encoding\n;) )\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.013"
    },
    {
        "id": 19032158,
        "hacker": "olliej",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 233,
        "comment": "That would make it a mere 7 years after the failure to maintain pipeworks\nresults in an explosion that killed 8 people.\n\nIt also didn’t stop giving bonuses to the executive board that make the\nbudgetary decisions.\n\nThis is also a glib dismissal of the effects of decades of under maintenance\nresulting in ever increasing costs to bring things back in order. Essentially\ndeferring maintenance until the point of failure, at which point you declare\nbankruptcy and get bailed out by the people you defrauded.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.222"
    },
    {
        "id": 19873639,
        "hacker": "olliej",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 233,
        "comment": "What do you mean by access the data?\n\nActivation lock effects the ability for the phone to be set up (e.g.\nactivated).\n\nActual data on the phone is encrypted to a set of keys, that are themselves\nprotected by the SEP, which checks the passcode, does the timer enforcement,\nand increments counters, etc.\n\nThe moment the device is reset/wiped the keys are gone forever and the data\ncannot be recovered (even if your took it apart and read the flash directly)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.071"
    },
    {
        "id": 20946385,
        "hacker": "olliej",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 233,
        "comment": "Here's the problem: Prop 13 amended the CA constitution to prevent the state\nfrom increasing assessed property value by more than 2% a year. Landlords\nrecognize that the real value is actually increasing faster than 2% and so\nincrease the rent at the actual market rate. Given living costs make up the\nsingle largest force controlling cost of living, including for tax payer\nfunded workers: police, firefighters, teachers, etc this fundamentally\nresulted in a massive tax cut for landlords, and more importantly _businesses_\n(who unfortunately aren't impacted by this).\n\nThe increasing disparity between taxed value and real value results in _all_\ntax payers having to pay increased income tax, which is then directed largely\nto landlords who aren't contributing their fair share - their properties are\nbenefiting from services that they aren't paying for.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.179"
    },
    {
        "id": 10834209,
        "hacker": "quanticle",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 234,
        "comment": "I wonder how much \"nice\" IDE features like auto-completion and auto-\nrefactoring go towards encouraging an \"intuitive\" mode of thinking. I've\ndefinitely noticed that when I work on Java or C# code in vim, I have to think\nabout it much harder than when I work on the same code in IntelliJ or Visual\nStudio. The lack of automated refactoring forces me to slow down and think\nabout what I'm doing, and reason about all the implications of my change,\nrather than just clicking some buttons and letting the IDE take care of the\nrest.\n\nThat said, while I'd _like_ to use as my sole development tool, I'm not sure\nI'd be _able_ to. The (proprietary) framework I'm forced to use is basically\nimpossible to navigate without some kind of IDE support. Yeah, it's not ideal,\nbut it's the state of the world I have to deal with.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.037"
    },
    {
        "id": 3848916,
        "hacker": "quanticle",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 234,
        "comment": "\"using the same naming convention on server as client means our JS doesn't\nhave a mix of camelCase and under_scores for things received via JSON\"\n\nCouldn't that almost be viewed as a feature, rather than a bug? I mean, this\nway you can instantly tell if a particular variable was received from the\nserver via JSON or was defined in the client code itself. I would consider a\nnaming distinction like to be a benefit, rather than a harm.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.036"
    },
    {
        "id": 10701880,
        "hacker": "quanticle",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 234,
        "comment": ">It's not a \"Tech company thing\" it's a \"junior engineer who doesn't know how\nto interview\" thing. It is an indicator of a low quality company.\n\nI guess Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook and Dropbox are all low quality\ncompanies, then.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 5070124,
        "hacker": "pedrocr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 235,
        "comment": "It can be useful as a currency as I mentioned. My point is that it's mostly\nuseless in itself (for actual uses of the metal) as can be seen by the fact\nthat we're perfectly happy keeping a lot of it locked away.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 7700795,
        "hacker": "pedrocr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 235,
        "comment": "I think the OP is right. The first mistake he mentions is just not reading\nenough from urandom and thus falling back on unsecure values, which is just\nsloppy C. Then all the other attack scenarios require the ability to replace\n/dev/urandom in various insane ways (sparse actual files, symlinks, other\ndevices). It all just seems pretty pointless. Just read /dev/urandom in a loop\nuntil you have enough and abort on any other case. That way you assure a\nsecure result as long as the user has a sane environment and abort otherwise.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.057"
    },
    {
        "id": 7622460,
        "hacker": "pedrocr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 235,
        "comment": "Right. These days a lot of people have a cable box or a fancy receiver feeding\ntheir TV and then end up with a mess of remotes to manage this. Connecting a\nmonitor to the cable box or receiver and having a single remote would actually\nbe much cleaner. As you say, if the cable box shuts down the HDMI port when\noff the monitor should turn itself on and off nicely.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 9581802,
        "hacker": "pedrocr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 235,
        "comment": "You're mixing up concepts. You want an experiment that can falsify the\nhypothesis, because if it can't it's worthless. That doesn't mean you don't\nrun the experiment to give evidence to the hypothesis.\n\nSo in the LHC case the hypothesis is \"the Higgs exists and it's energy is X\".\nThen they run the experiment and get evidence that says \"there is a very high\nprobability that there is a particle with energy X\" and so their initial\nhypothesis is considered proven. If you don't like the word proven, then they\nconclude it's extremely unlikely to be false.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.301"
    },
    {
        "id": 19139741,
        "hacker": "pedrocr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 235,
        "comment": " _> This wasn't my experience either on memory.net or crucial.com_\n\nAs far as I can tell crucial.com shows a total of 2 options. Both 16GB UDIMMs.\nOne tall, one short. I think last time I checked it had none. I didn't see a\nsingle option on memory.net. Remember that you need Unbuffered/Unregistered\nECC (UDIMMs with ECC) and there aren't many options of those. RDIMMs will not\nwork.\n\nIt's also hard to verify the DIMMs will work because the motherboard's QVL\ndoesn't list any of the ones I've found so far. Not all retailers will have\nthese either, so that seems hard enough to find for me.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.005"
    },
    {
        "id": 17331452,
        "hacker": "int_19h",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 236,
        "comment": "If you don't mind me asking - why Azure specifically?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19643082,
        "hacker": "int_19h",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 236,
        "comment": "I think the question is, does it stop being terrorist if a revolution happened\nin the past, but the actions are still recognized as having being terrorism?\nAre Jacobine writings terrorist in nature, for example? How about a scan of\nPravda circa 1918, with headlines like \"Long live the Red Terror!\"?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.041"
    },
    {
        "id": 19734673,
        "hacker": "int_19h",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 236,
        "comment": "I get the point you're making, and it's valid... but \"Vladimir, Jinping,\nJeong-Un, Narendra, etc\" is a bit offensive. One's ethnic background, and even\ncitizenship, does not define one's morality. Take a look at the list of names\non http://neveragain.tech/ \\- it's not all Americans and Europeans.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18737880,
        "hacker": "int_19h",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 236,
        "comment": "I would argue that console JRPGs constituted a separate genre from PC CRPGs at\nthe time. I remember that there was little intersection between the fan bases,\nand even some hostility.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.188"
    },
    {
        "id": 18830306,
        "hacker": "int_19h",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 236,
        "comment": "By \"libc\" I mean the userspace layer here broadly - on Windows that would be\nkernel32 etc. What VC++ calls CRT is built on that in turn.\n\nAlthough as of Win10, the actual CRT is also an API-stable OS-level component\nnow, not a VC++-specific thing:\nhttps://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/vcblog/2015/03/03/introduci...\n\nThe right thing here is the general notion of abstracting away core kernel\nAPIs in userspace. It lets you refactor the whole thing significantly without\nbreaking everything. And userspace calls are easier to maintain long-term for\nlegacy support reasons, as well (at some point you can make it into a DLL that\ndoesn't even have to be distributed with the OS, and just ship that with apps\nthat need it).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.094"
    },
    {
        "id": 15368542,
        "hacker": "int_19h",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 236,
        "comment": "The South expected massive cotton revenues to prop its economy.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Cotton\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 14251261,
        "hacker": "int_19h",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 236,
        "comment": "The problem is that he still has to target that platform as a developer,\nmeaning avoiding dependencies like new libstdc++ versions.\n\nAlthough one can always link statically...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.136"
    },
    {
        "id": 13798928,
        "hacker": "int_19h",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 236,
        "comment": "Thing is, switching the \"world language\" becomes a more expensive endeavor as\nmore content exists in it, and more speakers understand it. Last time that\nhappened - when French was replaced by English - the numbers were very\ndifferent. Sure, many educated people spoke French, but nowhere near as many\nas there are English speakers today, even in proportion to world's population.\nAnd it was not nearly as dominant for content: science was mostly done in\nnational languages, and so were books.\n\nTwo things changed the landscape a lot. First, universal school education,\nwhich in most countries includes at least some rudimentary English, vastly\nexpanded the number of people proficient with it to some extent. And second,\nthe amount of cultural and scientific interchange has skyrocketed, with both\neffectively standardizing on English as the common language.\n\nSo, short of some kind of near-extinction event that would unwind our progress\na couple hundred years back, I don't see a high likelihood for change. It\nseems that we're in the beginning of the \"common language\" era, and English -\nor whatever it evolves into over time, anyway - is going to be that language.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.132"
    },
    {
        "id": 13395102,
        "hacker": "int_19h",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 236,
        "comment": "Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't MapBox with vector tiles essentially\ncache and serve the raw GIS data (in PBF format) on a tile by tile basis, and\nthen render that on the client?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.244"
    },
    {
        "id": 13025221,
        "hacker": "int_19h",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 236,
        "comment": "https://www.facebook.com/int19h/posts/10209935398253997\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11857316,
        "hacker": "int_19h",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 236,
        "comment": "Human languages also solve it by taking into account context - and so do PLs.\nFor example, if your language can overload functions based on argument types,\nthen \"Char\" is already redundant.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 11050208,
        "hacker": "im2w1l",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 237,
        "comment": "Yes, it's clear that some parts of academia has people with really suspicious\nagendas.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 9223557,
        "hacker": "im2w1l",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 237,
        "comment": "If you don't even know the question (can I afford Ivy League?) internet is\nlittle help.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.188"
    },
    {
        "id": 8595210,
        "hacker": "im2w1l",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 237,
        "comment": "Invest directly in stock and bonds. And if that is not available, than invest\nin low fee funds.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.033"
    },
    {
        "id": 14456205,
        "hacker": "conductr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 238,
        "comment": "I agree. It's weird as f __* having every word spoke in my home recorded. I\nguess they say they 're not recording, but you know they are or will soon.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 16649913,
        "hacker": "conductr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 238,
        "comment": "Life long Texan and agree San Antonio has the best Tex Mex. Houston & Austin\nare close enough to be very good (and where my expectations come from, first\n25 years living there). I live in Dallas now, the Tex Mex here is just\nhorrible (comparatively). It's more of a Cali/modern inspired style. I've only\nfound a couple places that are close to what I consider authentic, but they're\nin odd locations that are difficult to patron. This, well the Dallas food\nculture in general (it sucks), is my biggest complaint about living in this\ncity.\n\nThat said, I still eat Tex Mex 2-3 times a week, but always look forward to my\nvisits back to Houston/Austin. Unfortunately don't make it to SA too often but\nwill give that place a try next time I do.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.029"
    },
    {
        "id": 16034557,
        "hacker": "conductr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 238,
        "comment": "I used to enjoy it. Now I dislike it. Perhaps your understanding will come\nwith time.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 13782272,
        "hacker": "patrickg_zill",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 239,
        "comment": "The Anandtech article linked above explains that the Arm cores differ from the\nXeon, since the pipeline architecture is not as complex.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 12616486,
        "hacker": "patrickg_zill",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 239,
        "comment": "I know Bernie supporters that live in TX and NC. Don't know anyone from AZ.\n\nUnless you are some odd political bent that is truly rare, I wouldn't worry\nabout it; and after all, there are plenty of nice people in those states that\nyou don't have to talk politics with, at all.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.174"
    },
    {
        "id": 7014987,
        "hacker": "patrickg_zill",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 239,
        "comment": "I can say, bluntly:\n\nYou have absolutely no competence to determine that.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 17395231,
        "hacker": "patrickg_zill",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 239,
        "comment": "I don't know about the other examples but Xerox made all their money back on\nParc and then some, via the laser printer patent iirc.\n\nThey did miss the boat on personal computing though...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.042"
    },
    {
        "id": 17737268,
        "hacker": "patrickg_zill",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 239,
        "comment": "Pascal came out in 1970; C in 1972...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20491760,
        "hacker": "joelx",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 240,
        "comment": "I used ancestry DNA and I don't understand why there isn't a single company\nthe compiles of master family tree for everyone with the data available?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.164"
    },
    {
        "id": 20275794,
        "hacker": "joelx",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 240,
        "comment": "This privacy issue is no fun, but it pales in comparison to the horrors\nperpetrated by the pharma industry and oil companies like this...\nhttps://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-environment/2019/06/2...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 21165237,
        "hacker": "joelx",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 240,
        "comment": "This is not true. The interstate highway system was a massive improvement to\nour country and enabled us to leap ahead. There are always sour grapes from\npeople who had to move, but moving should not be a big deal.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.081"
    },
    {
        "id": 14942230,
        "hacker": "Overtonwindow",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 241,
        "comment": "I'm deeply troubled by the response to this \"manifesto\". Pitchforks are out\nfor this guy, and when they find him, it won't be pretty. I think that's\nwrong. He has expressed his opinion, and people are free to confront, and\ndenounce him all they want. But this guy might lose his job. His career. All\nfor voicing his opinion. I don't think it matters that he did this internally.\nHad he stood up at a discussion in Palo Alto and said these words, the\npitchforks would still be out. Our country has reached a dangerous fork in its\nevolution where the freedom to speak can literally ruin your life. There was a\ntime when people were, and still are, shot for speaking their minds. Is this\nthe natural evolution we are heading towards?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.121"
    },
    {
        "id": 14061884,
        "hacker": "Overtonwindow",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 241,
        "comment": "I once worked for a large trade association in Georgia. The Director had a\ngeneral policy that anyone who refused to provide expected salary was not even\nconsidered, at all, no exceptions.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.055"
    },
    {
        "id": 14436690,
        "hacker": "Overtonwindow",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 241,
        "comment": "But wouldn't a guaranteed job program incite corruption?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15184403,
        "hacker": "contingencies",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 242,
        "comment": "AFAIK mining doesn't actually require connectivity until you want to reveal\nthe block. It's unlikely anyone else will discover it quickly, so you can just\nhave someone walk across a border (or get on a flight) and plug it in to the\nglobal network from elsewhere.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.042"
    },
    {
        "id": 18227207,
        "hacker": "contingencies",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 242,
        "comment": "For a counter point, I saw a huge group of people happily doing yoga out in a\nsquare the other day. Also this was shared in the open across domestic\nelectronic media. This would have been unthinkable around the Fulun Gong\nperiod. It looks to me like things are opening up slowly but surely. What was\nthe quote? \"Religion is poison\". Well, yeah. I'll take yoga over millenial\ncultists any day. But it'd be nice to see something like Taipei's desperately\nunderappreciated _Museum of World Religions_ [0] here in the mainland, to\ncelebrate the human journey and common perspective rather than denominational\nreligion per se.\n\n[0] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Museum_of_World_Religions\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.071"
    },
    {
        "id": 15122523,
        "hacker": "contingencies",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 242,
        "comment": "It depends what you mean by significant. SQL update becomes a two phase commit\nwith double network connection setup, execute, teardown latency as a worst\ncase. External auditing must be made. Sounds like hell.\n\nA flip-side view is that, in many cases, if you really want to trust your data\n(not your database), then you want to be doing this stuff to a large extent\nanyway... which means that, basically, it's just enforcing good practices that\nshould have already been present.\n\nComplexity and per-TX latency increases, but for that you get maintainability\nand a great deal of flexibility. Nothing is free... take your pick!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.165"
    },
    {
        "id": 15094392,
        "hacker": "contingencies",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 242,
        "comment": "Wife of billionaire with a track record of 100% failed ventures in mobile\ntells us all about mobile.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 13448968,
        "hacker": "contingencies",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 242,
        "comment": "Immediate graphical corruption and hard resets based upon minor pressure on\ncertain regions of the touch pad, comes and goes. When it's \"on\" it's frequent\nand irritating. Quote to fix is too high.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.045"
    },
    {
        "id": 13240402,
        "hacker": "contingencies",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 242,
        "comment": " _Look at the list of PV types for Kube_\n\nWhat I see is a lot of complex network filesystems, vendor-specific solutions\nand gateway protocols to expensive SAN solutions, which are already chalk and\ncheese in terms of features and performance.\n\nArguably one of the best features of unix-style systems is support for\narbitrary mount points, filesystem drivers and (network or local) blockstores.\nStorage is, essentially, a well-solved problem at the OS level. The fact that\nthis option is marked \"single node testing only – local storage is not\nsupported in any way and WILL NOT WORK in a multi-node cluster\" raises\neyebrows.\n\nBy choosing to expose individual remote storage model semantics as Kube-level\nPV drivers instead of just leaving this to the OS, what I would argue we\nessentially see here is the legacy of a cluster orchestration system that came\nout of Google... a system optimized for large, homogenous, dynamic workloads\nto provide organization-internal IaaS, and not reduced feature-set systems\nwith simpler architectural properties (eg. no multi-client network-aware\nfilesystem locking).\n\nI would argue that, in fact, what many people actually want is simpler, and\nthe current pressure to use 'one size fits all' cluster orchestration systems\nwith a high minimum bar of functionality and nodecount (read: minimum hardware\ninvestment) is misplaced. At the very least, there's some legitimacy to this\nline of thinking.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.015"
    },
    {
        "id": 13029364,
        "hacker": "contingencies",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 242,
        "comment": "Qunar was a travel meta-search engine in those days; we used to pay them to\nlist our inventory. Their API was quite shoddy. We stopped paying them,\nbecause it didn't make sense (we paid more for less business in return than\nwas profitable). They then turned around and started offering the same\nservices other companies used to offer and advertise through them... after\nthey'd taken everyone's listing and price data. I personally find that a\nquestionable change of model which would have caused legal havoc in a western\ncontext, not so in China. Tuniu I am unfamiliar with.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.044"
    },
    {
        "id": 11859681,
        "hacker": "contingencies",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 242,
        "comment": "I am a member of an informal dilettante multilingual poetry group here in\nChina and have been asked to translate quite a few Chinese poems and even\nwrite some myself, as well as to read translated poems at performances. I feel\nthis article doesn't really raise many interesting points, rather it glosses\nover the broadly accepted realities and imperfections of the translation of\nany subject, not just poetry.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.128"
    },
    {
        "id": 11071859,
        "hacker": "contingencies",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 242,
        "comment": "Yes, because humans are animals. Ignoring humans, while we are different to\nother animals, we are not really that different, particularly to other social\nmammals. So the answer remains yes.\n\nNote that this answer is self-evident and did not require torturing other\nbeings.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.063"
    },
    {
        "id": 8129420,
        "hacker": "contingencies",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 242,
        "comment": "Let's break this down. You've called drafting migrant workers from third world\ncountries defensible because they are paid more than in third world countries,\nand you used the euphemism \"available pool of talent\" to describe base rate\nunskilled labour.\n\nWhat happens to these people if they have an accident? I'm willing to bet they\ndon't get invited to a Singaporean hospital and kept on for two years while\nthey recover. What happens if they want to form a labour union? I'm willing to\nbet their visa is not renewed. What happens if they have an argument with an\nemployer? I'm willing to bet they're sent packing immediately with no\nopportunity to find alternative work or access social services. These are only\nbasic examples of security that people deserve in equal measure. A society\nthat relies upon the exploitation of others is not a sustainable or just\nsociety, even if everyone in town agrees not to mention or think about the\nreality of the situation or if there are worse places in the world.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.023"
    },
    {
        "id": 7598205,
        "hacker": "contingencies",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 242,
        "comment": "I think you missed, misunderstood or disagree with the phrase _in its\nconventional systems administration utilization_ with regards to ssh's\nevilness in production.\n\nI think its one of the latter two because of your third paragraph there, where\nyou slam the model under proposal (the disposable service container) as a\nnonexistant dream. Well, let me tell you, it exists and it works. I think most\nlarge companies use something similar (Google, etc.) because scaling any other\nway is too expensive.\n\nDisposable service containers are 100% predictable copies of well tested\nsystem images that never, ever get logged in to or altered... only started,\ncommunicated with, or destroyed in very well defined ways. They are not\nallowed to accrue undocumented state, because there be dragons.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.005"
    },
    {
        "id": 20857139,
        "hacker": "contingencies",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 242,
        "comment": "IMHO author is a US 'China expert' ripoff, source: I sought a quote from him\nand his rates were (even by lawyer standards) absolutely atrocious.\n\nHis interest in writing this article is clearly in removing HK in client minds\nas it's effective competition for him.\n\nI can recommend alternative law firms by email.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20680346,
        "hacker": "contingencies",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 242,
        "comment": "Not sure I agree. There are plenty of curated resources and institutional\nframeworks but the last time I took an online university-affiliated class I\nwould have learned more and saved time by simply reading a book. I think being\nbroadly educated is partly having the capacity to delve fruitfully in to\nunknown domains and grapple with unknown semantics. Perhaps I am biased: my\nmother was a librarian.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.016"
    },
    {
        "id": 5770973,
        "hacker": "ksec",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 243,
        "comment": "am i missing something?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 20440298,
        "hacker": "ksec",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 243,
        "comment": "They are certainly not _Sharp_ as in Sharp that it hurts. And I prefer the\niPhone 4 design ( Current iPad Pro Design ) then the current rounded every\ncorner design\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.016"
    },
    {
        "id": 15728379,
        "hacker": "ksec",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 243,
        "comment": "> Special talents\n\nSpeaking from my (limited) project management experience, I found distributing\ntasks to the right person is actually a talent in itself.\n\nNote: I was actually surprise how many people could not do it when I was\ntrying to transition away into another project.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.179"
    },
    {
        "id": 5304381,
        "hacker": "ksec",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 243,
        "comment": "I actually think that is where the path we should go, Hybrid of both tech.\nServing the initial view with HTML and the rest via client side JS.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14956100,
        "hacker": "ksec",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 243,
        "comment": "I asked everytime but never get an answer.\n\nHow did Unreal manage to evolve so quickly? If it was just one patch notes\nthen may be just a coincidence, but they have manage to do it every time for\nthe past months or years. I cant think of a single software / middleware that\nhas this pace of development. And Games Development were suppose to be hard?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.070"
    },
    {
        "id": 10103912,
        "hacker": "speeder",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 244,
        "comment": "How you noticed Ritalin? I mean, what it did that you noticed?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.312"
    },
    {
        "id": 5776206,
        "hacker": "speeder",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 244,
        "comment": "For those wondering why it is in a kickstarter clone and not on kickstarter:\n\nIt is REALLY, REALLY, REALLY hard to setup a Kickstarter if you live in\nBrazil, in fact I found the existance of catarse.me really cool, and I am\nrooting for their success (specially if this shows to Kickstarter what they\nare losing by only using Amazon payments as platform and thus making\nincredibly hard to people from other countries to setup projects).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.054"
    },
    {
        "id": 6340925,
        "hacker": "speeder",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 244,
        "comment": "He said that 70% do not speak Mandarin, and most of these do not speak \"well\".\n\nI guess only the \"speak well enough\" is related to dialects.\n\nThe other 30% I think he is referring to people that speak cantonese, and all\nother interesting languages that exists there, including the mongolian\nlanguages (almost everything in China west of the great wall, was originally\npart of mongolia, like Tibet for example... and thus they have not much to do\nwith China actually, specially Han people).\n\nI hope someday people will figure a way to keep mongolians peaceful without\nerasing their culture or resorting to extreme tyranny.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.177"
    },
    {
        "id": 5183925,
        "hacker": "speeder",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 244,
        "comment": "Oh, it is very political and related to very long term thinking, if I disclose\nhere the result will be a crazy flamewar (because it is a sensitive topic,\nthat I know lots of people support, and lots of people think it is horribly\nwrong).\n\nSo, it is better not :)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.008"
    },
    {
        "id": 6360281,
        "hacker": "speeder",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 244,
        "comment": "Beside the skull incident the guy in the other reply mentioned, we had for\nexample:\n\nDRM from Game Maker 6 and 7, made the software refuse to launch entirely\nsometimes, it was specially worse when other products with the same DRM were\ninstalled (interestingly, the other products worked fine... I believe GM\nimplementation of the DRM that was particularly broken).\n\nAlso the forums frequently had people complaining of the thing losing its\nregistration, or ask for the serial over and over and over again, and so on.\n\nMy own story: I decided to make my university final project with Game Maker.\n\nI bought 3 copies as needed for the team.\n\nThen one of them stopped working on my own machine, since I was the lead\nprogrammer, that was a problem... I started interacting with GM support team\nover it, they were rude, and not interested at all in fixing it.\n\nThen I complained on the forum, and my posts were deleted.\n\nThen I searched around on internet, and found out the past horror stories\nabout YoyoGames and how much people used cracked GM even after buying it\nbecause of all its issues...\n\nI got curious, and downloaded a cracked copy, and YAY! It worked super fine\n(eventually I delivered my project to the university using the cracked copy,\nmy dispute with Yoyo only finished after I delivered the project, when I was\ntrying to make another game then, and decided in the end to switch to\nNovashell).\n\nI then told support it was their DRM fault, their reply was: \"It is not... And\nif it is, complain to Softwrap (DRM vendor)\"\n\nThen I told them that the cracked copy worked, and asked them for a official\nno-DRM version.\n\nTheir reply was: \"You are a filthy pirate asshole\" (or something like that)\nand they closed all my support tickets (even ones that had nothing to do with\nthe DRM issue).\n\nI got extremely upset, and posted the whole story on their forums, screenshots\nand all...\n\nThen two bizarre things happened:\n\nAlthough SOME users got outraged too, most of them embarked into a sort of\nfanatic fanboism and started to spout lots of random crap, trying to offend me\n(and any other user that was outraged by my story), and throwing weird\ndefenses... Mind you, most of these were users of the free version (some\nprobably used cracked versions themselves, without paying... I paid for 3\ncopies, remember that).\n\nThen they deleted my post again... That was expected. What I did NOT expected,\nwas that they \"stealthbanned\" me, instead of banning me (something that would\ntell all other users I was banned), they just removed all my permissions, and\nkept doing that to any account I created... As soon I logged in the forums\n(with any account), I would get \"permission denied\" and could not see even the\nfront page, or log-off, but when I visited my past posts as a guest, they were\nthere like if nothing happened, like if I was never punished.\n\nSad with the whole situation, specially hearing that Mark Overmars (GM\noriginal creator) was a nice person, I e-mailed him.\n\nHis reply (I am copying and pasting from my g-mail)\n\n\"I am sorry but I am completely not involved in this process. I can only\nrecommend that you ask nicely and apologize for using a cracked version.\nHopefully that helps.\n\nMark\n\n______________________________________________ prof. dr. Mark H. Overmars\nInstitute of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University\"\n\nLater Yoyo pulled (against other people... I had already left, for obvious\nreasons) other funny stuff, like their first iOS Gamemaker they did some\nbacktracking on promises and did some unexpected stuff, and charged a \"tax\"\ntoo (I don't remember the exact numbers, but if you sold something for 1 USD\nat iTunes, you paid 30 cents to apple, and more 30 cents to Yoyo, also the\ngame had to be on their account, so they got all download numbers and whatnot,\nnot benefiting you of cross purchases).\n\nTo me it does not matter that the programmers are nice, or that the thing is\nwell programmed, or that they removed (after so much problems) their DRM, what\nmatters is that Yoyo games is a company that has no respect for its costumers.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.018"
    },
    {
        "id": 20772966,
        "hacker": "js2",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 245,
        "comment": "Just today, I uncovered an old gift card from a dept store called Rich's,\nwhich apparently became part of Macy's. I have no idea how old the card is,\nbut it has a year 2000 logo on it.\n\nThe card has a 800 number on it to check its status. So I called it and\nentered the card number. It was unrecognized. :-(\n\nIt was probably a $50 holiday gift to me at some point.\n\nI wonder whose pocket that money ended up in?\n\nWhat a racket gift cards are.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 3607076,
        "hacker": "js2",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 245,
        "comment": "The title is a bit unclear. Up through Lion, Apple bundled XQuartz to provide\nX11 support. Going forward, they will no longer do so. Instead you'll have to\ndownload and install the XQuartz binary separately. Apple will continue to\nsupport XQuartz as an open source project. There will just no longer be an\n\"official\" Apple version.\n\n[Edit: why would someone downvote this?]\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12497517,
        "hacker": "js2",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 245,
        "comment": "My morning cup of joe is usually made in an Aeropress from freshly roasted and\nground beans. Typically Counter Culture or Larry's beans (local suppliers),\nlight roast. I use a burr grinder.\n\nI sometimes also make Turkish w/o the cardamon, usually with a bit of sugar,\nmaybe with a splash of cream (blasphemy I know). But I will also occasionally\nuse a French press, a Chemex, or make cold brew. My wife uses a Moka pot, and\nI will sometimes use that to make a Cubano, though it's not nearly as good as\na Cubano made in a pump espresso machine.\n\nIt just depends on my mood.\n\nI gave up trying to make good espresso at home after getting frustrated with a\nGaggia machine. My fault, not the machine's, but in the end I decided it was\ntoo much effort for 1-2 oz of coffee. :-(\n\nTo answer your question: as long as the beans are freshly roasted and ground,\nand the coffee made with care, I'm not particularly partial to any technique.\nYou can even have a mighty fine cup of drip coffee. I think espresso is just a\nmuch more demanding technique to make well.\n\nAbout instant: I know Israelis and South Africans who prefer it, but no\nAmericans.\n\nMaybe the worst way to brew coffee: percolators. Oh the horror.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.039"
    },
    {
        "id": 14948073,
        "hacker": "tveita",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 246,
        "comment": "Normalizing household debt against the GDP makes the assumption that we are\ncomparing the debt with the ability to pay for it.\n\nBut according to graphs like this, even though the GDP has been rising, median\nhouseholds have not been getting a corresponding increase in income:\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Household_income_in_the_United...\n\nSo the income we are adjusting against is not necessarily going to the people\nthat are in debt!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4687517,
        "hacker": "tveita",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 246,
        "comment": "The rubber-band patent was also the patent asserted to make Motorola Mobility\nrecall their phones in Germany. I don't know how these things work, is the\npatent invalid in Europe now, or must it be investigated separately? Either\nway I'm guessing this will help their appeal.\n\nhttp://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2012/sep/14/motorola-mo...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7595993,
        "hacker": "tveita",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 246,
        "comment": "If miners want to provide this service, can't they just resolve double-spends\nbased on mining fee?\n\nIt doesn't seem like it there needs to be a middle-man here.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13725585,
        "hacker": "tveita",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 246,
        "comment": "It could be made to work on Git, but you'd need to make a collision that\nincluded the git blob header. The resulting files would not have the same\nSHA-1 hash until the header was added though, so they wouldn't be useful\nexcept for testing Git itself.\n\nMy guess is that Git wouldn't be 'hosed' like SVN, since it currently doesn't\nhave a secondary hash to detect the corruption. It would simply restore the\nwrong file without noticing anything was amiss.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 6287377,
        "hacker": "DigitalJack",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 247,
        "comment": "Do you think it would be feasible to use a drill to raise/lower it?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4343232,
        "hacker": "DigitalJack",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 247,
        "comment": "Are you suggesting the wiretap laws shouldn't be applicable if the uninformed\nend of the conversation is a public official?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4960350,
        "hacker": "DigitalJack",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 247,
        "comment": "They used a lightscribe dvd burner. I am not sure if the laser is much\ndifferent, but it scribes the \"back\" side of a dvd.\n\nhttp://cleantechnica.com/2012/03/17/make-your-own-supercapac...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 7392130,
        "hacker": "DigitalJack",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 247,
        "comment": "My rule of thumb is insure for 10x your income. That makes it feasible for\ninterest on the payout to replace your income.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9782143,
        "hacker": "meowface",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 248,
        "comment": "Why not HyperLogLog?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7875964,
        "hacker": "meowface",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 248,
        "comment": "You might be surprised that they often not only use a weak password in that\ncase, but also use a weak password for their IRC sysop account. And in some\ncases it is the exact same password. :)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.014"
    },
    {
        "id": 19158027,
        "hacker": "meowface",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 248,
        "comment": "But they did grill him pretty hard in that interview, at least. I think the\ninterview scenes reinforced he was a complete liar and charlatan. I was not\naware they paid him for it, but I think it was valuable to present his side of\nthe story (and knock it down if it was bullshit - which it was, and which they\ndid).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.075"
    },
    {
        "id": 15295459,
        "hacker": "legulere",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 249,
        "comment": "> but legal complexity is inherent in human affairs and cannot be simplified\n> too much.\n\nLegal systems are systems constructed by humans just like software and also\ncontain complexity by cruft. Our law concepts are based on Roman law. For\ninstance ownership was designed in a way to also deal with ownership over your\nwife and kids, slaves and debt peons.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 8862871,
        "hacker": "legulere",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 249,
        "comment": "It seems more like a checklist to me to estimate how bad the code is.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 8194727,
        "hacker": "legulere",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 249,
        "comment": "The \"issue\" with the turkish really cooled down in the last maybe 20 years.\nOver 50% of young people in Germany already say that Islam belongs to Germany.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.036"
    },
    {
        "id": 7503144,
        "hacker": "legulere",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 249,
        "comment": "Nah, LLVM is to slow for JIT. However the final compilation step still could\nbe done at install-time or link-time.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 574689,
        "hacker": "blasdel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 250,
        "comment": "There's a long history of people trolling/baiting Guido (just on whitespace\nalone!), but one commenter on this blog post had me giggling for quite a\nwhile:\n\n    \n    \n      How very pythonic of you to make up stupid reasons for not implementing a very simple optimization.\n      This is very pythonic because it shows poor decision making, poor performance and immature ideology.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.180"
    },
    {
        "id": 1328945,
        "hacker": "blasdel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 250,
        "comment": "The real problem is that pure content is being treated as an application.\n\nThere needs to be a separate whole section of the iTunes Store for this shit:\nMusic, Movies, TV, Apps, _Interactive_. It'd come with its own Webkit-based\ndevelopment environment, like Apple is doing for their new iTunesLP format\n(and did for Dashboard). The people making these pointless apps don't really\ngive a shit about integrating with the phone, and they aren't doing anything\nthey couldn't do in Mobile Safari -- they're in the App Store to get paid.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 1085912,
        "hacker": "blasdel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 250,
        "comment": "But you still get the same flash cookies, which are persisted _across\nbrowsers_.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 598447,
        "hacker": "blasdel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 250,
        "comment": "\"[Rob Pike] is a Canadian citizen and has never written a program that uses\ncursor addressing.\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10136250,
        "hacker": "richmarr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 251,
        "comment": "I agree, the article's assumptions are lined up to stretch to an attention\ngrabbing headline, but...\n\n\"99.999999% certainty that no human will ever live to the age of 130\" is not\nthe same as \"99.999999% chance of an individual reaching 130\".\n\nSorry, just my statistics pedantry for the day.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.073"
    },
    {
        "id": 13667074,
        "hacker": "richmarr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 251,
        "comment": "Agree with you.\n\nA couple of examples of change in that area;\n\nCompanies taking advantage by mothers who want to the workforce once their\nkids are in school by offering flexible working.\n\nCompanies dropping their long-standing policies of hiring from specific\nschools or attainment levels. These policies are historically quite common in\nprofessional services firms, but heavily reduce the available talent pool (and\nthus the quality of hires, because schools and attainment levels are not\nstrongly predictive of productivity).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.031"
    },
    {
        "id": 10717154,
        "hacker": "richmarr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 251,
        "comment": "I think you're spot-on in a scenario where insurance companies have deep\nenough pockets for any new floats they want to set up and had reduced\nregulatory requirements (with respect to things like EU Solvency II\nobligations)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.045"
    },
    {
        "id": 18169250,
        "hacker": "baby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 252,
        "comment": "I look for food, people, bars, atmosphere.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18093030,
        "hacker": "baby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 252,
        "comment": "> My main problem with discourse today\n\n> You can't debate things anymore\n\nI can't stop hearing this \"it used not to be like this\". Does this erroneous\nargument has a name?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 16551601,
        "hacker": "baby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 252,
        "comment": "> A better position is to use QUIC. Not only is the payload encrypted, but the\n> entire transport flow control is covered by the veil of encryption.\n\nI'm not sure I understand his/her point. Maybe this is pointing to QUIC\nencrypting part of the handshake?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.062"
    },
    {
        "id": 12104047,
        "hacker": "baby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 252,
        "comment": "It's interesting that all the posts on the terrorist attack in Nice(, France)\nyesterday were flagged on HN and this one is not.\n\nIf you want to get away from live/sensational news, rumors and dangerous\ndebates it makes sense to wait a few days before starting a discussion on the\nsubject. So why moderating the french attack and not this?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.019"
    },
    {
        "id": 7737472,
        "hacker": "baby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 252,
        "comment": "Leboncoin is so badly made it's a joke, and they completely monopolize the\nmarket. I'm raging just thinking I'm gonna have to use it to look for an\napartment and sell my furniture in Bordeaux those next months. Makes me want\nto build a competition.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 12056984,
        "hacker": "baby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 252,
        "comment": "Ah that was a cool video! I was showing that to my girlfriend the other day to\nexplain DH to her :)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.271"
    },
    {
        "id": 9708772,
        "hacker": "baby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 252,
        "comment": "There is a weird behavior when you highlight something that has partially\nalready been highlighted. I think you should take a look at how `preview` on\nosx does it. It cancels the already highlighted parts only if they are\nincluded in the new highlighted area. If an already highlighted part cross\nwith the new highlighted area, then it will behave like it is behaving in your\nscript.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.055"
    },
    {
        "id": 11131419,
        "hacker": "baby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 252,
        "comment": "ಠ~ಠ\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 21229708,
        "hacker": "baby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 252,
        "comment": "Maybe to avoid deadlocks?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 21139567,
        "hacker": "baby",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 252,
        "comment": "I’ve read other comments like this. Is this why Google created Alphabet?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 15690492,
        "hacker": "mojomark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 253,
        "comment": "The sun isn't the only source of radiant energy (visible light, IR, UV, etc)\nin a planetary system. Chemoluminescence and indeed heat itself (infrared (IR)\nemission) are other sources. I would think that living in a thermal\nenvironment closed off from the sun, creatures would be likely to evolve\nbioluminescent emitters/receptors or even fully developed IR Eyes in order to\ngain survival advantage.\n\n1.) https://voices.nationalgeographic.org/2014/03/14/from-night-...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.046"
    },
    {
        "id": 13967724,
        "hacker": "mojomark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 253,
        "comment": "I second the recommendation to write/file patents yourself vice wasting money\non lawyers. As implied, you generally won't be succesful selling an idea\nwithout a decent demo prototype, so dont fall into the trap of thinking the\npatent is the end-game. If you do consult a lawyer, I suggest thinking twice\nbefore filing any foreign patents (assuming you're outsie of the USA). If\nfound foreign patents to be a major money pit, which pobably isnt worthwhile\nunless you've invented something like, say, \"the wheel.\"\n\nFor patent images, you can do just about everything in PowerPoint and\nSketchup.\n\nLastly, if you do file yourself, note that you can file your first few patents\nas a micro-entity, which lets you pay a little less. Don't forget however that\nther are mainennance fees down the road though after the non-provisional is\npublished. These can be a shock if you're not expecting them. Here's a rough\nsummary of small entity USPTO patent lifecycle costs.if you file yourself (its\na little cheaper for micro), details may vary slightly:\n\n1\\. Provisional Filing - $130 ______________ (after 1 yr file non-provisional)\n2\\. Non-prov. Filling - $140 3\\. Utility Search - $300 4\\. Utility Exam - $300\n\nTotal non-provisional fees (2-4): $800 ______________ (after ~2yrs patent will\nissue) 5\\. Notice of Allowance (i.e. issuance) fee: $480 ______________\n(Maintenance fees over patent's life) 6\\. @ 3.5yr: $800 7\\. @ 7.5yr: $1800 8\\.\n@ 11.5yr: $3700\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.035"
    },
    {
        "id": 19558420,
        "hacker": "mojomark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 253,
        "comment": "Here, here! I was thinking the same. Ever since they first detected persistent\nearth-borne little buggers living on the exterior of the spacecraft. [1]\n\nI do think the detection of a methane spike by and orbiter and terrestrial\nrover within a day of each other, is an anomaly on a scale that doesn't seem\nto make a plausible for the case for earth-based bio-contamination. Perhaps\nthey should have at least addressed that aspect.\n\nThat said, I do cringe everytime I see an animation of a screw (rotating)\npropeller-based submarine exploring the oceans of Europa. Screw propellers\nwill always contaminate some material (not necessarily biological) and there\nis a risk of a lot of contamination should a seal fail. Propellers are a poor\npropulsion choice for exploration of pristine liquid environments, including\nEarth's subglacial lakes [2]. Instead they should either use seaglider [3], or\nsome oscillating foil propulsion like Thunniform locomotion [4] (both do not\nrequire any parts to penetrate the hull nd risk contaminating the\nenvironment).\n\nI will say though, that per the article, the findings of methane spike by an\norbital craft and a terrestrial craft within\n\n1\\. https://www.google.com/amp/s/relay.nationalgeographic.com/pr...\n\n2\\. https://salsa-antarctica.org\n\n3\\. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underwater_glider\n\n3\\. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/RoboTuna\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.069"
    },
    {
        "id": 8182360,
        "hacker": "smacktoward",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 254,
        "comment": "Wondering if Introversion Software had to deal with this when they made Defcon\n(http://www.introversion.co.uk/defcon/)...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 5935134,
        "hacker": "smacktoward",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 254,
        "comment": "\n    \n    \n       Fill your bowl to the brim\n       and it will spill.\n    \n       Keep sharpening your knife\n       and it will blunt.\n    \n       Chase after money and security\n       and your heart will never unclench.\n    \n       Care about people's approval\n       and you will be their prisoner.\n    \n       Do your work, then step back.\n       The only path to serenity.\n    \n\n\\-- Tao te Ching, Stephen Mitchell translation\n(http://www.amazon.com/dp/0061142662).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9316822,
        "hacker": "smacktoward",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 254,
        "comment": "Yeah, it's the curse of the generalist. My interests are so catholic that my\nblog ends up being about everything, which means as far as Google is concerned\nit's about nothing.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 9488952,
        "hacker": "smacktoward",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 254,
        "comment": "No, people who use ad blockers are cranky old idealists who demand tiresome,\nexpensive relics like \"privacy\" and \"dignity.\"\n\nDigital Natives™, having never lived in a world with those things, don't cause\ntrouble over them.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.220"
    },
    {
        "id": 19256991,
        "hacker": "smacktoward",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 254,
        "comment": "Attention.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7524758,
        "hacker": "smacktoward",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 254,
        "comment": "Or just sell the same product through two different channels. Call it\n\"Tarsnap\" and make it work via a CLI and low-fi Web site for the geeks who\nappreciate such things, and call it \"Super Secure Backup Pro XP\" (or whatever\nname appeals to normals) with a GUI and a lickable Web site for the non-geek\npopulation.\n\nUnderneath it can all be the same product, just packaged differently depending\non who the potential customer is.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.092"
    },
    {
        "id": 6135743,
        "hacker": "smacktoward",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 254,
        "comment": "I agree with you 110%.\n\nThat being said, I can also imagine how frustrating it must be to be a person\nwho's spent years (maybe decades) worrying about something that's really\nhappening, only to have their concerns dismissed with a wave of the hand or\nmarginalized as \"tinfoil hat\" conspiracy theories. It's not hard to imagine\nhow that could sour the disposition of even the sunniest person.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.051"
    },
    {
        "id": 13349087,
        "hacker": "jcoffland",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 255,
        "comment": "There is a simple test. Grab a random piece of Perl code and try to read it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 10916976,
        "hacker": "jcoffland",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 255,
        "comment": "This is exactly what I'm talking about. You can enable options to filter\nthough these warnings. Too many devs get overwhelmed by the output and give up\nearly. It takes some practice to use correctly but tools like valgrind are\ninvaluable.\n\nAlso, if you are ignoring warnings about using the wrong deallocator in C++\nthen you are making a big mistake. Your code may work but this causes nasty\nbugs. E.g. if you allocate with 'new []' and then deallocate with plain old\n'delete' or worse 'free()'.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.057"
    },
    {
        "id": 15990311,
        "hacker": "jcoffland",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 255,
        "comment": "> you'll have an authentication server which does only authentication\n\n> you'll have a file server which ONLY serves files\n\nThese sound like disadvantages. Decentralization would be better. I'd like to\nshare the storage of all my servers and not have one auth server as a single\npoint of failure. I imagine you can setup up a redundant auth server at the\ncost of more hardware but why not decentralize? This seems a lot like the old\nway of doing things.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.101"
    },
    {
        "id": 16241375,
        "hacker": "jcoffland",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 255,
        "comment": "> It's not like stocks where you can see actual bid/ask and daily volume\n> numbers.\n\nActually, it's exactly like that.\n\n> And since transaction costs and times make arbitrage impractical, the price\n> is not even the same across exchanges.\n\nArbitrage across crypto-currencies is happening constantly. As with stocks,\nbonds, futures, etc. the average person is unable to take advantage. Effective\narbitrage requires large sums of money and the ability to execute quickly.\nQuick execution often means having a preferential agreement with one or more\nexchanges. This is true in or out of crypto. Price differences reflect\nfriction and risk.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 7692076,
        "hacker": "bsilvereagle",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 256,
        "comment": "MKIV owners get to 400K without [engine] problems. Usually the water pump has\nto be replaced multiple times.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 7860413,
        "hacker": "bsilvereagle",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 256,
        "comment": "> I've seen professors actually stop their lectures to yell at some student in\n> the back until said student puts his laptop away.\n\nI had a professor that would make the student using the laptop come up to the\nfront of the room and finish giving the lecture. He said he picked it up from\nNabokov.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12094506,
        "hacker": "bsilvereagle",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 256,
        "comment": "> (Kodi's distro modded to boot straight to Retroarch)\n\nA little pedantic, but Lakka is based on OpenELEC (and may have switched to\nLibreELEC by now). OpenELEC/LibreELEC are buildroot based OSs that boot\nstraight into Kodi. Neither are affiliated with the Kodi project - but the\ndevs get along and communicate.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.071"
    },
    {
        "id": 2533827,
        "hacker": "orangecat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 257,
        "comment": "When Zuckerberg is running around saying that wanting to share things with\nonly certain people shows a \"lack of integrity\" (http://eparnell.net/?p=169),\nit's not an unreasonable preconception.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.107"
    },
    {
        "id": 2240294,
        "hacker": "orangecat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 257,
        "comment": " _Google requires you to be logged into a Google account to access the OS._\n\nReally? I thought it was like Android, where setting up a Google account was\nencouraged but not mandatory. If that's the case I'm revising my assessment of\nChrome OS from \"pointless\" to \"actively dangerous\".\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.217"
    },
    {
        "id": 20435370,
        "hacker": "orangecat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 257,
        "comment": " _I 'd MUCH rather have the menu say, \"Our prices reflect paying our workers a\nstrong wage, we encourage you not to tip.\"_\n\nYes, and I'd go even further because all phrases like \"tipping is optional\"\nare now firmly established as lies that you're expected to recognize as such.\nJust say \"we do not accept tips\" and eliminate the tip line.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.056"
    },
    {
        "id": 16068287,
        "hacker": "qwerty456127",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 258,
        "comment": "Xamarin.Forms is cool but still doesn't work on Linux so it seems the same\nstory as XAML to me - cool but of little use, unlike to HTML which is less\ncool but absolutely useful as it works everywhere. JavaFX - doesn't work on\nmobiles/tablets (there was a prototype in 2011, seemingly abandoned), sadly it\nseems to be about as dead as Flash and Silverlight now. As for QML - search\nresults suggest it works everywhere but still hardly a popular choice for some\nreason, worth taking a closer look perhaps (but I still doubt it can compare\nto HTML as using Qt means producing binary builds for every platform to\nsupport AFAIK).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.109"
    },
    {
        "id": 18490752,
        "hacker": "qwerty456127",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 258,
        "comment": "> But, on her computer, my mail appeared like it has been translated from\n> French to English then to French again... After a bit of fiddling, I\n> discovered that disabling the \"suggest to automatically translate a website\n> in a foreign language\" option solved the issue... That every email, even in\n> ProtonMail, is sent to Google even if, in this case, the translation should\n> not happen (translation had been disabled for both French and English\n> websites so there was no reason to think PM would be translated).\n\nSounds like a bug. I am going to disable the translation feature now, I never\nuse it but have never bothered to turn it off completely.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.028"
    },
    {
        "id": 18541576,
        "hacker": "qwerty456127",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 258,
        "comment": "Which can be active if taken with a MAOIs inhibitor and is outlawed in\nFlorida.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 20475749,
        "hacker": "tigershark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 259,
        "comment": "I don’t really think that it’s white noise, it’s mostly thermal noise and\n“reading the sensor” noise (forgot the real name) that have very different\nshape from white noise. If they were so easily filtered we’d have far superior\ndenoise effectiveness during raw processing.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.190"
    },
    {
        "id": 15461489,
        "hacker": "tigershark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 259,
        "comment": "Tell this to someone that committed suicide because of mindfulness.. Oh wait..\nthey look exactly the same to me in this case.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 15163267,
        "hacker": "tigershark",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 259,
        "comment": "I'm always sad at how tasteless are vegetables that you can find in uk\ncompared to Italian ones..\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.367"
    },
    {
        "id": 13101126,
        "hacker": "Rebelgecko",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 260,
        "comment": "GCM (Galois Counter Mode) authenticated encryption\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20915223,
        "hacker": "Rebelgecko",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 260,
        "comment": ">derogatory views of people that have chosen or have ended up in different\nlife paths\n\nI have no qualms admitting that I have derogatory views regarding the homeless\nguy that screams racial slurs at the driver when he's asked to stop smoking on\nthe bus. Most people aren't concerned about the \"average\" passenger, they're\nconcerned about the worst one you'll experience on a given day. And the worst\ncan range from minor things like the kid blasting shitty trap music on his\nbluetooth speaker, to someone who is in such a low place in life that it would\nactually improve their situation to shove you in front of a train and spend\nthe rest of their life being housed and fed in prison.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.189"
    },
    {
        "id": 20446875,
        "hacker": "Rebelgecko",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 260,
        "comment": "On some Macbooks, the USB-C on the left and right side don't support the same\nmax bandwidth\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.095"
    },
    {
        "id": 9248926,
        "hacker": "Rebelgecko",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 260,
        "comment": "They're swiveling landing gear is pretty cool, although it does look\nunsettling when a plane on the ground isn't moving the same way its nose is\npointing e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94AcSHpcZbI&t=39\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 9771174,
        "hacker": "basch",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 261,
        "comment": "beep beep error error\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15287922,
        "hacker": "basch",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 261,
        "comment": "every person should read this Adam Curtis article.\n\nhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/adamcurtis/entries/78691781-c9b7-...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 16424974,
        "hacker": "basch",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 261,
        "comment": ">in tech communities like HN and Reddit, the vast majority of people who know\nwhat AMP is also know that they hate AMP.\n\nwhich is an extremely tiny portion of people clicking links on the internet.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.267"
    },
    {
        "id": 17644447,
        "hacker": "basch",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 261,
        "comment": "Salt does other things to food besides alter taste and preserve.\n\n\"Salt is special. See, rather than simply flavoring meat by working itself in\nbetween muscle fibers, it actually alters the structure of meat, primarily by\ncausing certain parts of the protein myosin to become dissolvable in water.\n\nWhat does this accomplish? Well, by dissolving myosin, muscle structure is\ngreatly loosened, allowing it to retain more moisture (this is the principle\nbehind brining), and more importantly in this case, it allows proteins between\nmuscle groups to cross-link, causing them to stick to each other.\n\nThis is why, for instance, sausages get a nice bouncy, snappy texture, and why\nif you remove the salt from one, it becomes crumbly and dry (see here for more\ninfo on salting and making sausages, and here for some deeper scientific info\non the process of salting meat. http://qpc.adm.slu.se/Low_salt_pig-\nmeat_products/page_23.htm...\n\nhttps://www.seriouseats.com/2013/05/food-lab-tacos-al-pastor... (and a variant\nI like even more https://www.seriouseats.com/2016/02/how-to-make-mexican-\npueb...)\n\nThe same idea works with steak, but you need to be careful if you are anywhere\nbetween immediately salting the steak, and less than an hour. (scroll to the\nSalt section) https://www.seriouseats.com/2011/03/the-food-lab-more-tips-f...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.199"
    },
    {
        "id": 16353502,
        "hacker": "gruez",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 262,
        "comment": "or \"obtain\" a remux.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 17250456,
        "hacker": "gruez",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 262,
        "comment": ">Cockroaches can cure cancer\n\nsounds like pesudoscience. where's the evidence backing this up?\n\n>“The effectiveness of cockroaches has been tested by the bodies of our\nancestors and proven by lab experiments,” Geng said. [...] Researchers at the\nfirm have published dozens of articles about its product in both Chinese and\nEnglish-language medical journals. [...] Geng, Gooddoctor’s chairman, hopes\nthat multiple-substance drugs – such as those used in traditional Chinese\nmedicine – will one day be recognised by the international science community.\n\nmakes me think the papers they wrote weren't published in any serious\npublications.\n\n>But despite its kangfuxin ye potion having proven effective in treating\nulcers and skin wounds, the company has been unable to fulfil modern Western\nmedicine’s requirement to isolate a single active chemical substance from\ncockroaches, for use in drug manufacturing.\n\nAFAIK all you need to do to get a drug approved by the FDA is to demonstrate\nit's safe and effective. I seriously doubt isolating the drug to a single\nsubstance is a requirement of \"Western medicine\".\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.014"
    },
    {
        "id": 17416752,
        "hacker": "gruez",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 262,
        "comment": ">https://www.secretflying.com/posts/fuel-dumping-basics/\n\n>The extra flight added on to the itinerary that causes the fuel dump to occur\nis called the “strike”. This flight should be short and inexpensive, otherwise\nit defeats the purpose of this whole practice.\n\nwhy would adding an extra flight to the itinerary remove/replace the fuel\nsurcharge? surely this must be a bug in their booking system?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.140"
    },
    {
        "id": 17707350,
        "hacker": "gruez",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 262,
        "comment": ">the ads are killed before they are downloaded, in stead of stripped after the\ndownload (like with uBlock).\n\nThat’s false. https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock/wiki/Does-uBlock-block-ads...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 20634351,
        "hacker": "gruez",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 262,
        "comment": "That's not how it works. Arbitraging fuel isn't as easy as driving to another\nstate/indian reservation and buying cheap gas. Planes have maximum rake-off\nand landing weights. All that extra fuel you're carrying is freight that you\ncouldn't carry. Planes carrying too much fuel (typically because they're\nmaking an emergency landing shortly after take-off) have to dump their fuel to\nmeet their maximum landing weight.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.144"
    },
    {
        "id": 20636093,
        "hacker": "gruez",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 262,
        "comment": "* it's to testify against assange/wikileaks, not herself\n\n* she was offered immunity\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 21284070,
        "hacker": "gruez",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 262,
        "comment": ">Then I went to create one of these fake cards and got a notification that my\nactual credit card was charged $3. What? Turns out activating one of these\nfake cards automatically activated my free trial. I had no idea and was\nannoyed by this dark pattern, and even more annoyed I fell for it.\n\nWere you actually charged, or was it an authorization?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.117"
    },
    {
        "id": 14581109,
        "hacker": "Tade0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 263,
        "comment": "Everything has already been said in the article, but there's one thing that\nmakes Vue stand out the most: The author(s) are really focused on _keeping_\nthis framework's API simple and getting rid of/deprecating stuff that doesn't\npromote productivity.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.233"
    },
    {
        "id": 14805824,
        "hacker": "Tade0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 263,
        "comment": "Every other kind of environmental damage(as long as it's containable) can be\nprevented or undone with enough energy, so as long as that's being done all we\nneed to worry about is the energy ROI.\n\nSolar panels, throughout their life cycle, produce much more energy than it is\nrequired to produce and recycle them in an environmentally friendly way.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.179"
    },
    {
        "id": 18228292,
        "hacker": "Tade0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 263,
        "comment": "I rediscovered(after 10 years or so) a half-solution the other day: any\nactivity that requires focus but is done offline(so not programming nowadays,\nunless you have your docs/tutorials/etc offline).\n\nIn my case it's making music. The product is obviously crap and takes _a lot_\nof time to create, but it has done wonders to my ability to focus.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.463"
    },
    {
        "id": 10641822,
        "hacker": "pkaye",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 264,
        "comment": "This seems to be a hardware issue.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20133437,
        "hacker": "pkaye",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 264,
        "comment": "So what is the safer alternative to Glyphosate?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20446120,
        "hacker": "pkaye",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 264,
        "comment": "As Bill Gates was alleged to have said \"640k ought to be enough for anybody.\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 4942728,
        "hacker": "thefreeman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 265,
        "comment": "CM has already been updated with the fix\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7885580,
        "hacker": "thefreeman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 265,
        "comment": "I don't know, to me he presents at least one pretty compelling point\nindicating that point. The species which exhibit the exaggerated facial\nfeatures could not even form a fist with which to fight.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 8278480,
        "hacker": "thefreeman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 265,
        "comment": "But spammers would just send \"pokes\" as well. The system would have nothing to\ngo on besides the reputation of the sender when a poke is initiated, so this\nis no different then just sending encrypted text to begin with.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 5777785,
        "hacker": "genwin",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 266,
        "comment": "Yep. Frozen veggies with pesto is under 1 minute to get into the microwave.\nAfter heating, sprinkle on some cashews.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 5886994,
        "hacker": "genwin",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 266,
        "comment": "The ALTER doesn't have to be in the embedded code. It can be a separate\nutility.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7034042,
        "hacker": "genwin",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 266,
        "comment": "It would be like a passerby finding your door continuously wide open, stepping\ninto your foyer and shouting to let you know, you weren't there or didn't\nrespond, so he told your neighbor to tell you. Then you call the police\nbecause of trespassing.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 20129562,
        "hacker": "TheAceOfHearts",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 267,
        "comment": "Target does this. The price of certain online items sometimes varies in store,\nbut they at least inform you of it on their website.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.043"
    },
    {
        "id": 14946549,
        "hacker": "TheAceOfHearts",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 267,
        "comment": "Sometimes you're just forced to accept you need to take some shortcuts.\nThere's a few fields for which my general approach is to just try and maintain\na mental index of \"when might I want to use this\".\n\nI'd have a hard time implementing my own crypto, but I've learned enough to\nknow how to use it to secure communications, hide or protect information,\nensure no alterations have been made to some arbitrary asset, identify an\nasset's source, etc.\n\nI love working with a well understood and boring RDBMS. It's predictable and\nit lets you quickly move on to other problems. But you still need to have a\ngood understanding of how it's implemented in order to store and query your\ndata efficiently. If you have a poor understanding of how indexing works,\nyou'll probably have a hard time selecting the right data model.\n\nThere's actually lots of fun problems in the frontend world. Try to write a\nmulti-touch gesture responder, it's very tricky to get things right. How about\na natural animation system that allows interruptions? CSS animations tend to\nlook unnatural because they're largely time-based, and they don't handle\ninterruptions very well. (Spoiler alert: springs are the magic sauce.)\n\nLearning about compilers unlocks lots of powerful skills too. You can\nimplement your own syntax highlighting, linter, refactoring tools,\nautocomplete, etc.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.091"
    },
    {
        "id": 16821452,
        "hacker": "TheAceOfHearts",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 267,
        "comment": "No, I'm quite serious. Can you explain why you think that? What aspects of New\nZealand's government do you favor over the US? And to maintain a balanced\nview, are there any aspects of it that you'd criticize?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.098"
    },
    {
        "id": 1312646,
        "hacker": "jackowayed",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 268,
        "comment": "Yes. Every time a new Ubuntu release comes out, it's finally the one that has\nfixed everything wrong with Linux! It's only a matter of time before Linux has\na 50% market share of desktops thanks to this release!\n\nAnd then market share basically stays flat. But don't worry, there'll be\nanother _perfect_ release in 6 months :)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.148"
    },
    {
        "id": 1165092,
        "hacker": "jackowayed",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 268,
        "comment": "From the blog post pg linked to above:\n\n> _we say that \"groups that apply early have a significant advantage.\" We're\n> referring to Harj, who has already started to engage with groups that seem\n> promising._\n\nSounds like he's reading the apps and contacting groups if he thinks anything\nis unclear. All 4 YC partners read them all, at least officially.\n\nAs volume of applications gets even more ridiculous, I could forsee a future\nwhere he screens them all and marks them either \"skim\" or \"read\", where skim\nmeans \"I'm pretty sure they have no hope, just skim it it make sure I didn't\nmiss anything\" and read means \"I'd definitely consider interviewing them.\" but\nthey're probably reluctant to do that since it's important that they get the\nbest groups possible, and I highly doubt they'd do that on harj's first cycle.\nThey'll have to be really comfortable with his judgment before they let him\nprejudice their readings of applications.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.222"
    },
    {
        "id": 988567,
        "hacker": "jackowayed",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 268,
        "comment": "At least since Posterous just uses email, you could still post to Posterous\nfrom the office.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 646799,
        "hacker": "jackowayed",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 268,
        "comment": "It doesn't seem like that big of a deal to me.\n\nI had to sign one for my job this summer (small tech consulting firm that's\nnow doing a couple products and less consulting), but it was pretty limited.\nIt just said that I wouldn't work in the couple of pretty-specific fields that\nmy company's products are in for the next year.\n\nOne nice thing about the one they gave me was that they had a clause saying\nthat it did not in any way prevent me from using the programming knowledge\nthat I'm gaining, just the specific knowledge about the fields the products\nare in.\n\nNow, I wouldn't be comfortable of signing one much longer than a year. A lot\ncan change in say, 5 years. But 1 year so that you can't steal their ideas or\nhave an unfair advantage in competing with them because you know their plans\nis fairly reasonable.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.036"
    },
    {
        "id": 2857841,
        "hacker": "jackowayed",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 268,
        "comment": "But then @decorator doesn't work. I guess if I did that for every single\ndecorator I use, I would at least have consistency. But that's not a very\nsatisfying solution even ignoring the fact that now I have to wrap every zero-\narg decorator I want to use.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.188"
    },
    {
        "id": 12526017,
        "hacker": "qwertyuiop924",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 269,
        "comment": "Yep. I think most of us have this, gifted or no.\n\nAnd plenty of people on this forum are average. Including me.\n\nActually, I'm pretty sure that the average high school student doesn't browse\nHN, so maybe I'm not average in that respect...\n\nAlso, that joke was terrible. And it made me sad.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.019"
    },
    {
        "id": 12883118,
        "hacker": "qwertyuiop924",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 269,
        "comment": "What did you expect? You know where they come from, right?\n\nIf you don't, they come from 4chan. So yeah...\n\nBut they got accepted into GSoC as a mentor project, so they can't all be bad.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.207"
    },
    {
        "id": 12495333,
        "hacker": "qwertyuiop924",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 269,
        "comment": "Well, I've heard that the Mongo investors in investing in some _really_\nrevolutionary database technology next. Instead of having a document store,\nyou have many \"tables\" each containing \"rows\" of objects of the same type. And\nthe best part is that these objects can have _relationships_ to other objects,\nallowing you to separate complex data into its components, and describe all\nkinds of systems. It has a strong mathematical background, and the creators\nhave even developed an english like _structured language_ for _queries_. It's\nalready in use at Google and Facebook, so it's totally web scale.\n\nCrazy, right?\n\n/s\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.107"
    },
    {
        "id": 12312273,
        "hacker": "qwertyuiop924",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 269,
        "comment": "No, it's not. Binder was designed for Java, and the rest of the Unix family\ndoesn't support it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12678600,
        "hacker": "qwertyuiop924",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 269,
        "comment": "Checksums.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10612748,
        "hacker": "catshirt",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 270,
        "comment": "> _\" No, depression does not mean you're a recluse who does nothing with your\n> life.\"_\n\ni never implied anything of the sort.\n\n> _\" There is no stigma in having a mood disorder or seeing a\n> psychologist/psychiatrist. Please stop acting as if there is one.\"_\n\nsorry, but i think you may have accidentally responded to the wrong post all\ntogether. i have no other way to reconcile how completely irrelevant your\nresponse to my comment is. without getting into the details, i'm even somewhat\noffended by the assumptions you've made about my beliefs and personal\nexperiences.\n\nthe list of symptoms you posted even support my original statement.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.113"
    },
    {
        "id": 13875278,
        "hacker": "catshirt",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 270,
        "comment": "what is a \"slider toggle\"? sliders should be used for ranges of values.\ncheckbox for toggling values.\n\nwe could argue it's unfortunate that iOS(?) decided to start making their\n\"checkboxes\" look a little like sliders, but they still only toggle values\nthus you don't slide them.\n\nin any case, i get where you're coming from. using mousedown instead of click\nor up maybe kind of solves both use cases?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.022"
    },
    {
        "id": 5281976,
        "hacker": "catshirt",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 270,
        "comment": "Spotify solves this two ways:\n\n1\\. notifications for new releases (not sure what criteria solidifies future\nnotifications, but works well for me)\n\n2\\. apps. there are a ton of Spotify apps, and i believe all of them revolve\naround discovery. many of which alone are dedicated to ranked new releases\n(the Billboard app probably being the largest).\n\nboth of these methods work well for me... obviously, ymmv.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.087"
    },
    {
        "id": 1759937,
        "hacker": "cryptoz",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 271,
        "comment": "Wow, Google runs ads on Television? I consume all of my video media from the\nInternet these days so I guess I just didn't know, but that's surprising to\nme. Do they run the same type of promotional videos that you find on YouTube\nabout Chrome, or are they totally different adverts?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 3534380,
        "hacker": "cryptoz",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 271,
        "comment": "Well, the very point being made is that details can't be provided - we can\n\"scarcely imagine\" them. But if you look to the past, I think you can draw\nparallels that give the author the benefit of the doubt here. Take a few\nselect years from the last few decades and look at how \"your life\" may have\nchanged as a direct result of technology in the time span of a few years.\nAround 1992, the Internet began to fundamentally alter most people's[1] lives\nfor the better. Most of them never saw it coming. In 2008 or so, the\nsmartphone app revolution altered developer's lives in a huge way. The\nexamples abound, but of course it depends on who you are and what \"your life\"\nis. None of this will affect the solitary farmer in China - at least not\ndirectly, nor for a while.\n\n[1] in the developed world. See ~2012 for the developing world.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.079"
    },
    {
        "id": 1835219,
        "hacker": "cryptoz",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 271,
        "comment": "The implied ending to that sentence is \"...on Google.\"\n\n\"Maybe you shouldn't do it [...on Google]. Or, [...on the internet]. Or [...in\na way that people can find out].\n\nThe idea is that privacy is difficult on the Internet: your ISP knows what\nyou're doing, your search engine knows what you're doing, etc.\n\nSo doing something online _without telling someone about it_ is really really\nhard. So if you don't want someone to know about it, basically your only\nchoice is to not do it [online].\n\nIt's not that creepy and it's not the typical privacy fallacy everyone thinks\nit is (the \"if you're not doing anything wrong then you have nothing to hide\"\nbullshit)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.326"
    },
    {
        "id": 13426436,
        "hacker": "shostack",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 272,
        "comment": "I thought it meant having enough investments to live off\ndividends/interest/rent without having to touch your principle such that it\ncontinues growing on its own?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.184"
    },
    {
        "id": 13595141,
        "hacker": "shostack",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 272,
        "comment": "Do I recall correctly that you are a Googler working on AMP? Or am I mistaken?\n\nRegardless, the questions were hardly rhetorical--I'd really like to know, and\nthe other responder answered some of the questions with answers that confirmed\nsome of my concerns.\n\nDon't get me wrong...I think parts of what Google is doing here are solid and\nadmirable. Publishers screwed the pooch and something had to give. But that\ndoesn't mean Google gets a free pass on the strategic pieces of this they are\nclearly trying to set up and what they've done to date. The questions are\nvalid and if you feel they are unwarranted concerns, I'd love to learn why you\nthink the concerns are overrated.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.097"
    },
    {
        "id": 9957897,
        "hacker": "shostack",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 272,
        "comment": "Thanks for this post. How do things change if you use the default Messenger\napp vs. Hangouts?\n\nI just updated my Messenger app settings to uncheck these options, but when I\nwent into Hangouts to check there, \"Auto retrieve MMS\" was checked, but all of\nthose boxes were greyed out and it said \"SMS disabled - Touch to make Hangouts\nyour default SMS app\".\n\nSo the question then is whether that is a sufficient indicator that Hangouts\nis not used, and is Hangouts still vulnerable if I am just using the default\nMessenger app?\n\nEDIT: Stock Nexus 4 running vanilla Android 5.1.1\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 10149817,
        "hacker": "shostack",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 272,
        "comment": "I'm guessing you have a lot of flexibility with how you tackle things in your\ncurrent role, as well as more control over your work/life balance. Consider\nhow those would change by taking a new role. More money might solve some\nproblems currently, but it quite likely may come at the cost of far less free\ntime.\n\nIf you ever want to get your own stuff off the ground (and it sounds like you\nare equipped to attempt that), and your current pay is workable, it might be\ngood to focus your free time on these new endeavors vs. taking the higher\npaying job and not having the free time to explore that.\n\nBeyond that, if you still feel passionate about your current company, start\ndigging into why you don't feel there is growth potential. Is it a management\nissue? Is the company itself stalled? Is it that the founders are greedy and\ndon't want to pay you more? Getting at the root of that might add some clarity\nto your decision-making process and priorities.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.220"
    },
    {
        "id": 10617642,
        "hacker": "shostack",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 272,
        "comment": "That always made me a little nervous. We have all these new safeguards in\nplace around mortgages since the last crisis, and I wonder how things like\nthis are ok to leave up to back-channel conversations.\n\nNot knocking you or your situation specifically, but in general if someone is\nnot a great risk, but that goes away if they get someone to make the right\nphone calls, is that a good thing in the big picture?\n\nNot judging, just posing the question.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.121"
    },
    {
        "id": 11927276,
        "hacker": "shostack",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 272,
        "comment": "Can you expand on your experiences, and why you think they are a trend?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13054926,
        "hacker": "shostack",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 272,
        "comment": "On a related note... What stops companies from doing things like adding a\nbackground mining script to a website that uses people's browsers to do the\nmining?\n\nI'm not very familiar with the tech behind BTC mining so there may be some\nobvious reason that isn't feasible. I was always surprised some evil company\nlike EA hasn't added it to wait screens when matchmaking for various games.\nThey could install whatever they want, target machines likely have solid GPUs,\nand they are sitting around waiting.\n\nI also wonder about the legal aspects of this. Would someone need to opt in\nthis? Is the energy cost of something like this legally distinguishable from\nsites that say... load a bazillion tracking tags and eat up your data cap?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.095"
    },
    {
        "id": 13085838,
        "hacker": "shostack",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 272,
        "comment": "Can you set it to never, set it to always while using it, and set it to never\nwhen the ride ends?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13097541,
        "hacker": "shostack",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 272,
        "comment": "I might be doing it wrong but it might also be that I'm on a Nexus 4. When I\ndo that it brings me to Google search but the voice prompt still needs to be\nactivated via tapping the mic button or using the voice command. Is there a\nway to change that to just immediately activate it?\n\nAnd what about from when the screen is off? I have a software home button so\ncan't use it until the screen is turned on unfortunately.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 15475319,
        "hacker": "Clubber",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 273,
        "comment": "In all fairness, it sounds like the author took over the project after it was\nalready 2 years late.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 16416669,
        "hacker": "Clubber",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 273,
        "comment": ">What ever happened to making useful things?\n\nLots of things.\n\n    \n    \n      - The patent debacle that started in the Clinton administration\n      - Not enforcing anti-competition laws allowing companies to consolidate. \n      - Companies giving away all their IP to China in exchange for cheap labor.\n      - Allowing our tech manufacturing sector to rot on the vine.\n    \n\nThe US still makes lots of useful things, they just can't make them within our\nborders.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.333"
    },
    {
        "id": 15283554,
        "hacker": "Clubber",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 273,
        "comment": "Yes, it's required for generators too. You have to install some sort of switch\n(I forgot what it's called) so the house power doesn't feed back into the grid\nand kill a lineman.\n\nThe title is very misleading as well. Just goes to show that Fox News and\ntheir ilk aren't the only ones who do fake news, it's journalism in general.\n\nAlso, the title is an outright lie: \"Thanks to Lobbying, It's Illegal to Power\nYour Home with Solar Panels in Florida\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.079"
    },
    {
        "id": 7345206,
        "hacker": "altcognito",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 274,
        "comment": "Sure, and we had video and web storage too. This is just standardizing and\nmaking it possible to interoperable different frameworks on top of this.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 8631685,
        "hacker": "altcognito",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 274,
        "comment": "Because software development isn't a small fixed set of problems on a single\nplatform?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.074"
    },
    {
        "id": 4805609,
        "hacker": "altcognito",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 274,
        "comment": "Because I've worked at no less than three companies that have done exactly\nthat, and the entire basis of the article talks about the monetary value of\nhow you can move hours around, completely eliminating the human nature of work\nand craftsmanship. People who work on projects that they aren't going to be\nassociated with in the future usually care less about quality.\n\nWorking colocated is only one facet of the equation. I would think ownership\nis a well understood concept in the startup industry. Being invested means\nmore than being colocated or even having a financial stake. (open source\ndevelopment -- again, some small number of passionate developers generally in\nit for the long haul)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.014"
    },
    {
        "id": 7318346,
        "hacker": "altcognito",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 274,
        "comment": "Scraper sites usually don't reference the source material, but yeah, you might\nwant to get some ice for that burn.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 21524926,
        "hacker": "sjg007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 275,
        "comment": "YC, effectively, owns the whole stack (i.e. vertical). Their main selling\npoint is the YC network and being founder friendly to derisk creating\nstartups. YC also created the continuity fund that is where the typical VC\ncomparison would be. I am not sure what the terms on it are but I imagine it\nis geared only to their companies. This means YC is willing to assume more\nrisk and gives a vote of confidence for their products. It's amazing really to\nsee this grow as big as it has in 15 years give or take.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.206"
    },
    {
        "id": 14933733,
        "hacker": "sjg007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 275,
        "comment": "Well just sell Ebooks.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 21415325,
        "hacker": "sjg007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 275,
        "comment": "Go get a sleep study done. That will tell you. You may have sleep apnea. Also\nyou may want to ask your doctor about a sleep aid such as ambien.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 16179219,
        "hacker": "sjg007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 275,
        "comment": "Bezos has a house there. So we should rank these by where the CEO has a house.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.800"
    },
    {
        "id": 21118812,
        "hacker": "sjg007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 275,
        "comment": "If you want to spend your day working on theorem proving then get a PhD. If\nnot, don't. You may also find another PhD subject you may like more. A PhD\nopens different doors even though you may still arrive at the same\ndestination. If you are paralyzed in making a decision, you might want to\nstart the PhD and do a summer internships at various companies. Use\ninternships as a way to evaluate a \"regular\" jobs. BTW this advice doesn't\nmean you have to stay in this country that you hate. You may be able to get a\nPhD somewhere you like!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.017"
    },
    {
        "id": 17065477,
        "hacker": "sjg007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 275,
        "comment": "I’m suggesting it’s turtles all the way down. The AI class you take in college\nis based on results from DARPA funded grants on say threat assessment or\nbattlefield awareness or even automated defense technologies. It’s exactly the\nsame except where you are on the R&D product timeline.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.031"
    },
    {
        "id": 20414085,
        "hacker": "sjg007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 275,
        "comment": "Eh maybe. Technology can be a major differentiator for business success even\nfor a non-tech player. I am not sure what a non-tech player is anymore..\nDominoes is pretty tech savvy as is Chick-fil-A for instance.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.091"
    },
    {
        "id": 21098594,
        "hacker": "sjg007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 275,
        "comment": "possibly.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20384034,
        "hacker": "sjg007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 275,
        "comment": "In the long term, you may not want to switch companies. It forces upon you a\nwhole lot of unexpected costs, even accounting for a higher pay.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 7275726,
        "hacker": "sjg007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 275,
        "comment": "Imagine sending money via What's App.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18277775,
        "hacker": "sjg007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 275,
        "comment": "It's not really a game..\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 10457535,
        "hacker": "noja",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 276,
        "comment": "Don't touch my OS! If you want to install some packages, tell me to install\nthem (or ask me!). I don't like this script so far.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 19604083,
        "hacker": "noja",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 276,
        "comment": "AirBNB needs to show rating percentages, i.e. the % of people who _do_not_\nleave a rating. Most people do not like to leave negative ratings.\n\nAirBNB (Amazon too) also need to enforce normalized ratings. Another five star\nreview? Either adjust all ratings to an agreed average (e.g. 3 stars) or let\nusers \"use up\" their 5-star ratings allowance.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.017"
    },
    {
        "id": 15468220,
        "hacker": "noja",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 276,
        "comment": "In one case you were looking at the world from the perspective of a poor boy,\nin the other from a rich earner.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 11420933,
        "hacker": "noja",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 276,
        "comment": "with other <strike>open source</strike> solutions.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 9049870,
        "hacker": "yodsanklai",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 277,
        "comment": "Very true. Propaganda was so successful that even when you rationally know\nStates are bad, your heart tends to give them the benefits of the doubt. Like\n\"they did that in the past, but we're more civilized now\", \"our president is\nsuch a nice guy, he wouldn't do anything evil - he said it won't happen\nagain\", \"it happens in other country, but mine is better\".\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.086"
    },
    {
        "id": 9069852,
        "hacker": "yodsanklai",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 277,
        "comment": "> they can spot the music majors in the first day of class just by noticing\n> how much better at pronunciation they are than the other students\n\nIt makes sense. I can see at least two explanations. First musicians are used\nto listening to sounds in order to reproduce them accurately. Second, less\nobvious reason, is that they are less shy to \"perform\". Maybe I'm wrong and\ngeneralizing my own case, but I think that sometimes people are just too shy\nto work on their accent. As kids, we used to make fun of those that were\ntrying to have a correct accent.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.026"
    },
    {
        "id": 9077583,
        "hacker": "yodsanklai",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 277,
        "comment": "I worked for a while with a Turing Award winner. And indeed, he wasn't the\ntype of person that had time to lose on a forum. He's been working a lot his\nwhole life. But that being said, he wasn't the most interesting person in the\nworld either. I had other colleagues who were far less accomplished\nprofessionally but with a much broader culture than him, including in computer\nscience.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.168"
    },
    {
        "id": 7827333,
        "hacker": "yodsanklai",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 277,
        "comment": "What's the difference between this work and for instance [1] where they use F7\nand F#?\n\n[1] Karthikeyan Bhargavan, Cédric Fournet, Markulf Kohlweiss, Alfredo Pironti,\nPierre-Yves Strub: Implementing TLS with Verified Cryptographic Security. IEEE\nSymposium on Security and Privacy 2013\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 8369608,
        "hacker": "yodsanklai",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 277,
        "comment": "How to explain it? is it an addiction that grows slowly, or is it a\nconsequence of people being dissatisfied with their lives. I also wonder if\ncannabis, when fully legalized, will replace alcohol as our \"drug of choice\".\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 20723310,
        "hacker": "Annatar",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 278,
        "comment": "Much has improved and illumos keeps getting better and faster: since 2005, no\ncode which causes performance regressions was allowed into the Solaris\ncodebase. Each speedup committed set the base higher. Nobody would be allowed\nto commit code which slowed the performance thereafter. Any case where\nGNU/Linux was faster was treated as priority 1 bug. Yes, a bug.\n\nImplementing tools within other tools for convenience is stupid, as it kills\nmodularity, which is the UNIX®️ philosophy: I don't need that kind of\n\"convenience\" since I know UNIX®️ and therefore which pipes to use to which\ncommands to get the same effect. grep -r replaces find + xargs + grep and\ntherefore goes against \"do one thing and do it well\" as well as against\n\"design tools to interface with other tools\". For example tar is a tape\narchiver, therefore it has no business implementing compression - that's what\ndedicated compressors like bzip2 or xz or 7z are for - they know best how to\n(de)compress and how to handle their own formats. Therefore, the GNU approach\nof convenience is stupid beyond retarded.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.023"
    },
    {
        "id": 11654210,
        "hacker": "Annatar",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 278,
        "comment": "> Can you please reframe your response with solutions, and not snark?\n\nHardly, as it would require writing a book.\n\nBut, what I can do is give you some starting points:\n\nhttps://wiki.smartos.org/display/DOC/Home\n\nSet up a TFTP server, a DHCP server, and use PXEGrub (ipxe is flaky). Boot the\nsystem off of the network. As soon as you log in, read the manual pages for\nimgadm(1M), and vmadm(1M), then pull down the \"base64\" image. Also read up on\nSolaris zones. Oracle documentation will do, as SmartOS and Solaris 10 are\nsimilar to a good degree.\n\nNext, read up on pkgsrc, and make a simple \"helloworld\" package. After you get\nall that working, get Gemalto SmartCard code working on SmartOS (as Solaris\nwas a big market for SmartCards, the code should still work on SmartOS).\n\n> \"They are dumb, because they don't do it how I would do it. I know better.\n\nTo summarize:\n\nif you want security, you have no business running Linux-anything, not now,\nnot ever: the choices are either OpenBSD or SmartOS, and rejoice that we do\nhave alternatives.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.038"
    },
    {
        "id": 17165688,
        "hacker": "Annatar",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 278,
        "comment": "HP-UX was hard to get started on building software, but once one builds up a\nbase of common libraries, it gets easier and easier, just like it did on\nSolaris.\n\nhp's engineers never broke backward compatibility. The OS is lightning fast\nand rock solid. That takes a lot of insight and knowledge.\n\nredhat constantly brakes things, I find things which work yetsterday that\nbreak tody, even in the same mainline release. They couldn't even get shutdown\nto work correctly, a couple of years back when we were working on integrating\nXFS (and they were still resisting it), the kernel was panicking because they\nwere trying to write to an unmounted filesystem; that was 18 years into\nLinux's development.\n\nSmartOS engineers would never do such a thing on purpose, as they are guided\nby the 'empathy is still a core engineering value', put in words in an answer\nby Keith Wesolowski, and in those very rare cases when they do, they fix it\nimmediately.\n\nWith redhat we get constant finger pointing between them and the hardware\nvendor, they never act responsible for anything although we pay them lots of\nmoney. What the hell are we paying them for then? They can't even engineer\nproper code and drivers for their own OS for the hardware they officially\nsupport. That's not engineering, that's hacking!\n\nThe worst by far is their lack of architecture. Take Satellite for example,\nwith their concept of channels: unbelievably confusing and complicated. Have\nyou tried integrating your own RPM's into it? The needless complexity!\n\nWe had Satellite filling up an Oracle tablespace with irrelevant garbage log\ninformation even though we just installed it; I called redhat up and asked\nthem how to lower the amount of information Satellite is generating so that it\nwouldn't constantly fill up the tablespace. Their support told me that I have\nto go talk to Oracle because it's an Oracle database problem! Yeah, they are\nthat kind of experts!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.058"
    },
    {
        "id": 11078066,
        "hacker": "dingo_bat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 279,
        "comment": "Firefox on Android with uBlock Origin.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11057983,
        "hacker": "dingo_bat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 279,
        "comment": "I'm not very familiar with ChromeOS but I can cite an example in Android:\n\nWhen you turn on Location in your Android phone, every time there is a\ndisclaimer (unless you turn the notice off). It says that Google will collect\nyour location data. If you decline, your phone's GPS is useless. So, in order\nto utilize the hardware you bought, you are forced to give up your privacy.\n\nThis is the definition of \"tracked by default\". Is there any hardware feature\nthat Windows does not allow users to access if you turn off all the tracking?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.315"
    },
    {
        "id": 12410825,
        "hacker": "dingo_bat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 279,
        "comment": "I think you mean G5. Also, newer Moto phones are also modular in a way.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.312"
    },
    {
        "id": 13458822,
        "hacker": "dingo_bat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 279,
        "comment": "According to very quick Web searches, $1000 is about 80% of the median\npersonal income in the usa. I calculated the same rate for India and it comes\nto ₹2751 per month based on a median income of $616 per annum.\n\nIf I were to get ₹2751 extra every month, it wouldn't make a difference for me\nat all. In fact, my monthly expenses are 10x this amount and I'm only spending\nless than 50% of my income.\n\nSo this measure surely isn't meant to have any effect on people like me. I\nwould imagine it's a similar calculation for most people on this website. For\nthis reason alone, we are very badly positioned to react in an emotional\nmanner. The only decisions that should be taken should be taken on the basis\nof trials and hard statistics. Otherwise the \"free money for slackers\"\nsentiment is too strong when it may not be the truth.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.060"
    },
    {
        "id": 14821789,
        "hacker": "dingo_bat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 279,
        "comment": "The first link was the first time I really understood something about bitcoin.\nI think the key is that it is just technial enough but not too much. Thanks.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 15377690,
        "hacker": "dingo_bat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 279,
        "comment": "Why not just give them some money and let them decide where to spend? I doubt\nphone top ups are critical for a refugee.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 15482799,
        "hacker": "dingo_bat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 279,
        "comment": "Interestingly, your inference is almost opposite to the commonly accepted\ndefinitions.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.067"
    },
    {
        "id": 21070104,
        "hacker": "AJ007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 280,
        "comment": "I can’t speak authoritatively about this specific instance, but I use multiple\nunlinked google products across multiple devices and they absolutely split\ntest UI changes. It can be fairly nefarious on the advertiser/publisher side\nof things if you actually understand what their attempting to do.\n\nIt’s really too bad, because Google traded their pristine reputation for\npossibly a slight boost in their near term earnings.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.058"
    },
    {
        "id": 4577877,
        "hacker": "AJ007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 280,
        "comment": "Gator/Claria did this 10 years ago. Replacing existing ads is a big no, and is\nquite different than popping up ads over someone's existing site.\n\nBased on what happened with them, pretty much any one who owns a website that\nshows display revenue can be a plaintiff again Megabox.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.113"
    },
    {
        "id": 6484036,
        "hacker": "AJ007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 280,
        "comment": "Starting on page 24,\n\n1) Located the first reference to \"silk road\" on the internet. You can find\nthis yourself on Google: \"silk road\" site:shroomery.org Date range: Jan 1,2011\n- Jan 31,2011 __*\n\n2) The same username, \"altoid\", showed up on a bitcointalk days later.\n\n3) Later in 2011 \"altoid\" made a post on bitcointalk with his email address,\ncontaining his real name, in it:\nhttps://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=47811.msg568744#msg5... If you search\nthe name on Google it doesn't show up, but if you look at the user's page you\ncan see it in his posts.\n\nThat seems like more than enough for a warrant for this individual. Everything\nafter that should be easy.\n\nI've used Google before to locate when a particular word or phrase first\nappeared. Kind of surprising someone didn't figure this one out quicker.\n\n __* Obviously this is a common word, so either adding other keywords with it\nwould be likely.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.149"
    },
    {
        "id": 7534793,
        "hacker": "AJ007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 280,
        "comment": "You can hand over the task of bidding for conversions to Google. Besides\npresenting your business on a silver platter for them, you lose control over\nthe finer points of your campaign.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10853753,
        "hacker": "AJ007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 280,
        "comment": "First another country takes control over the place you live, then the US\ngovernment bans everyone from letting you participate in global trade. I guess\nthe same thing happened in Cuba.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.097"
    },
    {
        "id": 10985519,
        "hacker": "AJ007",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 280,
        "comment": "You are wrong on #1. The biggest con was Facebook selling those \"likes\" to\nyour competitors.\n\n#2 addressed elsewhere\n\n#3 YouTube started through copyright violations and continues to benefit from\ncopyrighted content today (if the rightsholders do not try to enforce.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 3218020,
        "hacker": "sneak",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 281,
        "comment": "It's not the first amendment thing I posted it for - but for the part where he\npoints out that... \"THEY'RE JUST WORDS.\"\n\nYes, words have meaning, and that meaning can change the world, but if someone\nmaking dick jokes causes you to get hyper-uncomfortable, maybe you have some\npersonal sensitivity issues to work through before you start worrying about\nthe level of professionalism at a conference that you obviously don't want to\nbe at.\n\nIn short: \"Yes Virginia, the world has dick jokes in it.\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.062"
    },
    {
        "id": 3752990,
        "hacker": "sneak",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 281,
        "comment": "There is a certain gloriousness to waking up WELL-RESTED at 3PM after a long\nnight of hacking or clubbing, having a leisurely breakfast, and then hopping\non IM with your colleagues in EST5EDT that just rolled in to the office at\n10AM. Or maybe that's just me.*\n\n* http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-24-hour_sleep-wake_disorder\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.082"
    },
    {
        "id": 5905150,
        "hacker": "sneak",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 281,
        "comment": "If you have the key from the server, and it's not using a cipher suite that\nsupports forward secrecy, then you do not need to actively MITM to decrypt the\ntraffic. All you need is the long term key and the intercepts. You can then\ndecrypt the session key from the initial connection setup.\n\nThis is why the DHE/EDH modes exist. It uses DH to agree on a session key,\nthen uses the long term key just to ensure the DH agreement hasn't been\nactively mitm'd. The session key is never transmitted or permanently stored,\nso once the connection cache expires, nobody can decrypt retroactively, not\neven the parties to the conversation.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.033"
    },
    {
        "id": 5922920,
        "hacker": "sneak",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 281,
        "comment": "That's how it works now. It would be foolish to assume that your emails are\nstored on disk unencrypted.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15493760,
        "hacker": "sneak",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 281,
        "comment": "You’re objectively wrong, and likely have significantly outdated understanding\nof what is possible on a “terribly limited” “phone os”.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.194"
    },
    {
        "id": 19701762,
        "hacker": "sneak",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 281,
        "comment": "It is racist to assume that someone’s place of birth determines their\nallegiances.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12762325,
        "hacker": "klodolph",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 282,
        "comment": "This response got a bit long.\n\nNo, that's absolutely not how to think about it. In short, it's a dangerous\nsimplification and it's not at all representative of how failures work in a\nsystem like S3 or Google Cloud Storage. It does make good marketing copy, but\nif you are an engineer or a program lead you have a certain level of\nresponsibility for understanding why cloud storage does not, in practice, give\nyou eleven 9s of durability per object every year. (At a first approximation,\nyou would _at least_ expect the data loss to follow a Poisson distribution,\nbut…)\n\nDrilling down into the techical guts, S3 and Google Storage do not store\nseparate objects in the lower storage layers, it's too inefficient. So below\nthe S3 / GCS object API, you have stripes of data spread across multiple data\ncenters with error encoding, along with a redundant copy on tape or optical\nmedia. Randal Munroe estimated Google data storage at 15 EB (https://what-\nif.xkcd.com/63/), so taking that number, let's suppose a stripe size of 100 MB\n(just picking a number out of the air that seems reasonable) and you get\n1.5e11 stripes. Taking Amazon's 11 nines, that gives a loss of 1 stripe every\n8 months.\n\nSo, all we've done so far is look at how a system would be implemented, and\nwe've already completely destroyed the notion that you would expect 40 of 400B\nobjects to disappear due to bit rot in any particular year. Supposing the\nobjects are 10KB in average size, you might expect most years to lose no\nobjects at all, and if you lose any you might lose 10,000 at the same time—and\nthe entire extent of your recourse is to get a service credit from your cloud\nprovider.\n\nThe gotcha is that the system simply isn't that reliable. First of all,\nengineers at Amazon and Google are constantly pushing new configuration and\nsoftware updates to their stack. Some of these software updates can result in\ncatastrophic data loss, and some of these errors will not get caught by\ncanaries. \"Catastrophic\" might mean metadata corruption, it might mean the\nloss of many stripes all at the same time, but from the cloud provider's\nperspective they're still meeting SLA for _most_ of their customers so _most_\nof their customers are happy. On top of that, you also have to take into\naccount the possibility that a design flaw in the storage media would cause\nmassive data loss across multiple data centers simultaneously, or other\nnightmare scenarios like that. Given that I've personally experienced data\nloss due to design flaws in storage media and I only have ever owned twenty\nhard drives or so in my life, you can imagine that a fleet with millions of\nhard drives presents some unique reliability and durability problems.\n\nYou can pretend that these configuration and programming errors are \"unusual\nevents\" but the fact is that stripe loss for any reason is already an unusual\nevent, and you might as well include the _most probable_ cause of data loss in\nyour model if you are going to model it at all.\n\nSo, what is the SLA? It's part of a contract. It defines when the contract is\nperformed and when it is broken. It's also a piece of marketing and sales\nleverage. That's all. It's not a realistic or particularly useful description\nof how a system actually works—so the responsible engineers and program\nmanagers at companies which use cloud services are always asking themselves,\n\"What happens if Amazon or Google violates their SLA? Will I lose my job?\"\n\n(A footnote: You don't need to verify the bits yourself, cloud providers will\nsend you messages when your data is lost. If you want more durability then you\ngo multi-cloud or buy a tape library.)\n\n(Disclosure: I work at a company that provides cloud storage.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.097"
    },
    {
        "id": 9314967,
        "hacker": "klodolph",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 282,
        "comment": "Intuitively, the view already doesn't correspond to what you see, even if\nyou're only a commercial pilot. That's why planes have attitude indicators.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 8146662,
        "hacker": "klodolph",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 282,
        "comment": "I think it has to be the sheer number of APIs that Microsoft has developed:\nthey just don't have the resources to care about very many of them. It stems\nfrom Microsoft's extremely insular culture in the 1990s and 2000s, where being\na \"Microsoft developer\" meant that you just didn't read code for open-source\nprojects, didn't look at competing APIs, just did everything your own way.\nApple had its own bad APIs, and blew a bunch of them away when OS X came\nalong. So you want TLS/SSL on OS X, the typical way to do it was to just use\nOpenSSL. OpenSSL has tons of problems, but at least they're well-understood\nproblems, with source code and documentation.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.073"
    },
    {
        "id": 19102315,
        "hacker": "klodolph",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 282,
        "comment": "The messy part of C# is the way it does function overloading. (Speaking as\nsomeone who likes C#.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 19188127,
        "hacker": "klodolph",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 282,
        "comment": "Incorrect. This falls under “immigration status”, a protected class under the\nImmigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. Please consider reviewing your\ntraining material if you are involved in the hiring process.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 17546177,
        "hacker": "klodolph",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 282,
        "comment": "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chili_pepper\n\nI don’t go around telling britons to get rid of their Us or trade in their Zs\nfor Ss. No point in it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15745879,
        "hacker": "klodolph",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 282,
        "comment": "The Let’s Encrypt client validates your server by placing a file on your\nwebsite at a specific location.\n\nThere are other ways too, but this is the easiest.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.062"
    },
    {
        "id": 4015947,
        "hacker": "jonursenbach",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 283,
        "comment": "They've since taken the video down.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.156"
    },
    {
        "id": 2053774,
        "hacker": "jonursenbach",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 283,
        "comment": "Light grey text on a white background scalds my eyes.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.117"
    },
    {
        "id": 3095728,
        "hacker": "jonursenbach",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 283,
        "comment": "They didn't post it indefinitely. They postponed it till the 27th.\n\nhttp://thenextweb.com/google/2011/10/07/samsung-and-google-t...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7213197,
        "hacker": "pessimizer",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 284,
        "comment": "\"Search engine\" is not jargon. An English speaker from a century ago would\nunderstand what it meant - although they wouldn't know from what you were\nbuilding the engine, or what it was meant to search.\n\nSearch engine? http://www.etoday.ru/assets_c/2009/11/sobaka2-thumb-600x462-...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14525813,
        "hacker": "pessimizer",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 284,
        "comment": "They should just do what Uber did: be heavily invested in by the mayor's\nbrother.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 11536882,
        "hacker": "pessimizer",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 284,
        "comment": "Paging Dr. Wakefield... Paging Dr. Lysenko...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6500354,
        "hacker": "pessimizer",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 284,
        "comment": "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purchasing_power_parity\n\nLook up Switzerland within any measurement of it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7374761,
        "hacker": "pessimizer",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 284,
        "comment": "You're implying that accounting for the fact that people in Denver get \"2x to\n4x the average radiation\" but \"have far lower rates of cancer\" is a problem\nfor people who saying that small multiples of radiation exposure raise cancer\nrisk, but ignoring that a lower incidence of cancer for Denver would have to\nbe accounted for in any case, no matter what you believe about the\nrelationship between radiation exposure and cancer.\n\nUnless your actual argument here is that radiation prevents cancer - and I'd\nsay that you have a higher burden of proof for that.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.010"
    },
    {
        "id": 2908849,
        "hacker": "pessimizer",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 284,
        "comment": "If you're paying $20 an hour and you can't find a decent Java programmer, I'm\nnot sure if it's a failure of the market. I wouldn't program for $20 an hour\nno matter where I lived, unless life sucked or I wasn't very good. And if\npushed by desperation to take that job, I would be constantly trying to find\nanother one.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.102"
    },
    {
        "id": 6035078,
        "hacker": "pessimizer",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 284,
        "comment": ">if you start giving men maternity leave in the same way as women\n\nI agree.\n\n>Normal banter between men about women kept on the \"acceptable in a sitcom\"\nwhen not directed at any specific women, in my view is not sexual harassment,\nbut clearly some people disagree with that.\n\nI definitely disagree with that _at work._ If you want to discuss your\nsexuality, comment on people's body parts, or articulate your unified theory\non the differences in the natures of men and women, get some friends. People\nhave to work in order to eat - allow women (and men) to get through it without\nhaving to constantly bite their tongues or else be seen as the problem. We've\nmade a decision as a society that racial, sexual and religious discrimination\nare problems at work. Find another subject.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.020"
    },
    {
        "id": 5016481,
        "hacker": "alttab",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 285,
        "comment": "Not great conversation for a dinner party, but I'd buy one for $100.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 1716230,
        "hacker": "alttab",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 285,
        "comment": "Intersting idea, but what does this have that ruby or javascript doesn't?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4192027,
        "hacker": "alttab",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 285,
        "comment": "Ah I understand. Yes polymorphism in this case would hide the details, and the\nimplementation for turning the car belongs inside of that object.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7476908,
        "hacker": "alttab",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 285,
        "comment": "Which is not a viewpoint from someone who \"likes\" it. They have an objective,\nprofessional point of view. He doesn't like it though.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 10462343,
        "hacker": "alttab",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 285,
        "comment": "I have not hired capable \"homework programmers\" for this very reason. If you\ndo not code outside of your CS degree you are toast in this industry.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 12023678,
        "hacker": "alttab",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 285,
        "comment": "I feel good managers often delegate the decision making power to the group or\nteam leads. This creates scale for the manager, and allows room for the\ndevelopment teams to develop leaders and judgement.\n\nCompanies that are set up well also give minimal control over bonus allocation\nor salaries. These things should be controlled by HR and recruiting, along\nwith salary and compensation policies based on role and level. Managers\nsupposedly have the best view on IC performance, so within some band they\nshould be able to influence rate increases and promotions. Anything outside of\nthat would need to be a conversation between the manager/IC and HR. My advise\nhere is if you feel there is a deviation in your pay, get your manager to bat\nfor you, do not go to HR yourself.\n\nAnd by design, management will have access to more information than individual\ncontributors, but that's the purpose of the role. This person brings in\ninformation, priorities, and resources to the team to execute. This is where\nthe \"power\" idea comes in, but anyone in this position long enough would tell\nyou its more of a \"responsibility.\" It's not always clear what is right and\nwhat isn't, nor even a way to really prove it ex post facto. Could it give\nsomeone enough perspective to make self-interested decisions that ICs could\nnot? Probably.\n\nI suppose the question is, is that bad and how is it bad, and how would you\neliminate it?\n\nEdit: My wishful novelist inside me says its the software program that\nautomates resource allocation, charter, and IC development. You could\nessentially build an autonomously managed organization with IC roles being the\nonly true human employees.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.142"
    },
    {
        "id": 19529408,
        "hacker": "rorykoehler",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 286,
        "comment": "Am I the only one who sees depopulation of rural areas as a good thing? It's\nan opportunity to rewild large parts of the continent. We don't need humans\ndominating every last square metre of the globe. That's part of what is\ncausing most of our problems in the first place.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.238"
    },
    {
        "id": 15649181,
        "hacker": "rorykoehler",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 286,
        "comment": "Same reason people who didn't take taxis take Uber.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12716979,
        "hacker": "rorykoehler",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 286,
        "comment": "I've always found the right-libertarian philosophy to be extremely confused.\nThey want freedom to do whatever they want but they also want to base\neverything off of capitalism which by definition means you can't do whatever\nyou want unless you're rich. It just doesn't make any sense (unless of course\nyou're already a billionaire in which case your world is already quite\nlibertarian in reality).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.275"
    },
    {
        "id": 11511642,
        "hacker": "Gravityloss",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 287,
        "comment": "There's going to be problems as long as money gives such a big boost towards\nbeing elected.\n\nCould candidates have standardized, free/fixed low price advertisement? At\nleast some portion of it?\n\nThere they would get to state their goals and views, and people could make an\ninformed decision on who to vote.\n\nThere are \"voting advice applications\" where a voter can answer a web quiz and\nthen see which candidate answered closest to them, with explanations, comes\nclosest. We have a few of those, by broadcasting companies, newspapers and\nmagazines here, and I believe they have some effect at least on candidate\ndiscovery. Then they can go to the candidate's web site to learn more. I'm\nfrom a country that has a multi party system though. As far as I know, it\ndoesn't cost anything for the candidate to participate (answering the quiz),\nand the money comes from ads / general visibility to the quiz host.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voting_advice_application\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.020"
    },
    {
        "id": 8182771,
        "hacker": "Gravityloss",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 287,
        "comment": "It seems to fall quite slowly.\n\nIf the first stage is 38 m and travels its length in 1 s, that's only 38 m/s,\n140 km/h or 90 mph.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.017"
    },
    {
        "id": 7912849,
        "hacker": "Gravityloss",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 287,
        "comment": "The logo has the bike going left. This is against visual conventions and it\nseems backwards.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4296066,
        "hacker": "m0skit0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 288,
        "comment": "Backwards compatibility is an evil illness that sometimes must be broken. It's\nfor the good of evolution. I praise engineers that make such decisions, even\nif they are unpopular.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.175"
    },
    {
        "id": 17029387,
        "hacker": "m0skit0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 288,
        "comment": "My phrasing implied that other democratic regimes didn't care because the\nrepublic was too left leaning.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.062"
    },
    {
        "id": 14894158,
        "hacker": "m0skit0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 288,
        "comment": "Hydroelectric depends too much on orography. Not all countries have\nwaterfalls, and if they have, they could be in inaccessible regions where it\nis very costly to build, let alone transport.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 1541114,
        "hacker": "DennisP",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 289,
        "comment": "Adaptive payments just started accepting credit card transactions:\n\nhttps://www.x.com/people/BaldGeek/blog/2010/06/25/its-offici...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18672352,
        "hacker": "DennisP",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 289,
        "comment": "We could get imported hemp products but our farmers weren't allowed to grow\nit.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10272018,
        "hacker": "DennisP",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 289,
        "comment": "The first problem they mention is that we waste 30% of our food. A recent\nstudy found that for seafood in the U.S. it's even worse, we waste almost\n50%....but that waste is mostly at the consumer level. I don't see how that's\nfixable. You're not going to stop people from throwing out leftovers.\n\nhttp://phys.org/news/2015-09-seafood.html\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.036"
    },
    {
        "id": 10859083,
        "hacker": "zAy0LfpBZLC8mAC",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 290,
        "comment": "> The routing tables don't get bigger\n\nThey do, because of route fragmentation, not because of address size.\n\n> AS numbers are 32 bit anyway and unlikely to get bigger\n\nNo, AS numbers were 16 bit until well after the introduction of IPv6.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 19809510,
        "hacker": "zAy0LfpBZLC8mAC",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 290,
        "comment": "Why exactly should a vendor not be responsible for the quality of its product\njust because they weren't hired to repair it?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.225"
    },
    {
        "id": 14855595,
        "hacker": "zAy0LfpBZLC8mAC",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 290,
        "comment": "> It isn't. The arguments that it is a 'myth' boil down to arguments that it\n> isn't perfect and doesn't protect against every attack. Well, guess what: no\n> security measure is perfect and no security measure protects against every\n> attack.\n\nExcept NAT provides absolutely no security, and complicates your network\nsetup, thus making it more prone to configuration errors and other attack\nvectors due to complexity.\n\n> At the very least, a secure IPv6 network will need to hide end user\n> addresses somehow, because giving everyone a unique, globally-addressable\n> and trackable ID is a security showstopper.\n\nThat is called privacy extensions. Also, it's pointless if you allow cookies\nin the browser.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.194"
    },
    {
        "id": 12701055,
        "hacker": "zAy0LfpBZLC8mAC",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 290,
        "comment": "That's where it matters least because it doesn't solve the problems with\nelectronic voting computers.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 10311234,
        "hacker": "0x0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 291,
        "comment": "I'd say the \"-R\" might actually be harmful; for example the mysql GPL\ndistribution binaries from dev.mysql.com installs in /usr/local/mysql and you\ndefinitively don't want to mess with the database file permissions there.\n\nIt might not be \"best practice\" to let non-homebrew stuff put things in\n/usr/local, but it happens.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.275"
    },
    {
        "id": 9631180,
        "hacker": "0x0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 291,
        "comment": "I do expect them to understand that, when they are arguing against it. :)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 8742588,
        "hacker": "0x0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 291,
        "comment": "I guess what I meant was the type of libraries that (often non-crypto-experts)\nport over to their favorite language. I'm sure that Go is one of the better\nones, but there's lots of \"random\" implementations of ssh/ssl/crypto floating\naround on sourceforge/codeplex/pear/github/whatever which are unlikely to have\nbeen as thoroughly battle-tested as the ubiquitous ones.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 5233154,
        "hacker": "0x0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 291,
        "comment": "The x86 android emulator with the intel HAX thing isn't too bad, already.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.700"
    },
    {
        "id": 19608971,
        "hacker": "0x0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 291,
        "comment": "Seems unlikely to ever render identically. At the very least I believe chrome\nuses the platform specific font shapers (coretext on mac, cleartype on win).\n\nSo in the end, a mac version of edgeium just adds yet another browser to the\ntest matrix columns....\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.022"
    },
    {
        "id": 16818512,
        "hacker": "0x0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 291,
        "comment": "Apple has in fact stated that High Sierra is the last major release to run\n32bit apps \"without compromise\" (their words). So probably a macOS 10.14 could\nshow up in a couple of months at WWDC without 32bit app support, just like iOS\n11 did last year.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.056"
    },
    {
        "id": 9844819,
        "hacker": "0x0",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 291,
        "comment": "I'm having a hard time imagining any legitimate use cases for this API at all.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.292"
    },
    {
        "id": 19680368,
        "hacker": "lispm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 292,
        "comment": "Checkout the Lisp Game Jam. It's coming up in two days:\n\nhttps://itch.io/jam/lisp-game-jam-2019\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 8726582,
        "hacker": "lispm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 292,
        "comment": "TCP-PACKET-FILTER\n\nWINDOW-STREAM-DRAW-STRING\n\nWhat is the prefix of above symbols?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 1294774,
        "hacker": "lispm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 292,
        "comment": "The point was not lst[0:2] in Python. See the definition of Take in\nMathematica - it is quite a bit more capable.\n\nYou need also differentiate between 'pattern matching' and 'rewrite system'.\nPattern matching is just taking a pattern, some data and see if it matches.\n\n    \n    \n        (match '(+ (* ?a x) ?b) '(+ (* 123.0 x) z)) -> T\n    \n\nRoutines like the above are found in many books about Lisp and have been\nprovided in Lisp libraries for decades.\n\nSpecifying rewrite rules with patterns for mathematical purposes\n(simplification, integration, differentiation, ...) is also almost as old as\nLisp. Norvig's book 'Paradigm's of AI Programming' explains how it is\nimplemented in Lisp. These things are at the heart of several computer algebra\nsystems written in Lisp - like Macsyma.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.186"
    },
    {
        "id": 16592015,
        "hacker": "lispm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 292,
        "comment": "> I think of Paul Graham's On Lisp[2] as the first wave of modern Lisp style,\n> and Doug Hoyte's Let Over Lambda[3] as the second wave.\n\nBoth are seen slightly controversial by some. On Lisp for example indicates\nthat PG actually wanted to program in a different language - and eventually\ndid: Arc.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 6754341,
        "hacker": "tlarkworthy",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 293,
        "comment": "it's first author is a Googler, and its posted on a Google domain.\n\nEDIT: haha I am downvoted for speaking the truth. The parent and I have both\nread lots of papers like these, there is only a modest contribution of this\npaper. It basically says we fudged the inference and the end results look\nsimilar so its a good optimization. However, there will be probably lots of\nspecific models that \"need\" the mixing freedom the approximation removes, and\nhence the algorithm will only work for a specific subspace of MCMC problems.\nMCMC is basically impossible to debug, so we dunno how well it works overall.\nTHIS IS THE SAME CONCLUSION OF EVERY OTHER MCMC APPROXIMATION PAPER. The only\nreason this is on HN, is because of its heritage. I do not think this paper is\nrevolutionary (unlike some other papers coming out of Google).\n\nEDIT 2: evidence Modern: \"Fully Parallel Inference in Markov Logic Networks\"\n\\- Max-Planck \"Hybrid Parallel Inference for Hierarchical Dirichlet Process\"\n\"A split-merge mcmc algorithm for the hierarchical dirichlet process\" Old:\n\"Parallel Implementations of Probabilistic Inference\" a 1996 review paper!\n\nYou might say these papers are not exactly the same, ok, but the final\njustification for the given paper is:\n\n\"Depending on the model, the resulting draws can be nearly indistinguishable\"\n\nNOTE kewords: \"depending\" and \"nearly\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.046"
    },
    {
        "id": 4942583,
        "hacker": "tlarkworthy",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 293,
        "comment": "well at least you have came out significantly wiser\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.038"
    },
    {
        "id": 8312034,
        "hacker": "tlarkworthy",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 293,
        "comment": "QP framework. Its bloody brilliant.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 16450936,
        "hacker": "tlarkworthy",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 293,
        "comment": "It's replacing all the auth, provisioning, billing, load balancing, throttling\nand other crap. Sure you might still duplicate ur business logic, but at least\nno team is reinventing the serving infra\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.181"
    },
    {
        "id": 4275471,
        "hacker": "tommorris",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 294,
        "comment": "Another example at the moment is the UK government are slowly opening up with\nthe Open Government License.\n\nhttps://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:OGL\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 7126525,
        "hacker": "tommorris",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 294,
        "comment": "They can. It's expensive and often doesn't work when you need it most. Lots\nand lots of long-term gay couples can attest to the expense, complication and\nineffectiveness of trying to replicate marriage through contract law and other\ncivil deeds.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.073"
    },
    {
        "id": 12180363,
        "hacker": "tommorris",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 294,
        "comment": "Perfectly legal to charge for public domain photos, just as it is legal to\ncharge for software that's released under open source licenses, so long as you\nfollow the terms of the license.\n\nPeople are lazy and will pay money so they don't have to think about\nlicensing. If you are a graphic designer working in an ad agency and you have\na choice between \"go online and download a PD work and not be sure\" and \"pay\nGetty $50 and if there's a copyright issue, you can tell your boss that you\npaid Getty\", which do you do? Pop it on the corporate credit card is the\neasier option.\n\nIt's the same reason big companies were suspicious of open source for a long\ntime. And some still are.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.042"
    },
    {
        "id": 19559863,
        "hacker": "dominotw",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 295,
        "comment": "This is possible with public transportation too. Trains run express and skip\nstops all the time.\n\nI think that would be too much hassle with buses but it's possible.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 17017652,
        "hacker": "dominotw",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 295,
        "comment": "I have the same problem. Too traumatized (when I was young) by a person\nteaching in a lecture format. I like self discovery and tinkering.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 13564870,
        "hacker": "dominotw",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 295,
        "comment": ">experts have decided that it was indeed the protectionist policies causing\nthis.\n\nI am curious about this. Do you have a reference.\n\n>It's also a bit offensive.\n\nSorry I didn't mean it to be offensive. I think I got that from Nehru's\nbiography that I read couple of years ago.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.304"
    },
    {
        "id": 15867047,
        "hacker": "dominotw",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 295,
        "comment": "People are constantly quizzed on map-reduce, spark type of stuff in\ninterviews.\n\nResume 1:\n\n> Did simplistic programming using for loops.\n\nResume 2:\n\n> Map reduce using spark.\n\nGuess which resume gets picked up by filters? Noone wants to get caught with\ntheir pants down when they have to look for their next job.\n\nPressure to \"keep up\" is unfortunate reality of our profession. Resume Driven\nDevelopment is a thing.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.159"
    },
    {
        "id": 16177407,
        "hacker": "dominotw",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 295,
        "comment": "<deleted>\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12326941,
        "hacker": "dominotw",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 295,
        "comment": "This is exactly how my day is going to be today. Glad I never got married or\ndecided to have children.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.333"
    },
    {
        "id": 19734846,
        "hacker": "dominotw",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 295,
        "comment": "I had a coderpad facebook phone screen last week, interviewer said \" that code\nthe won't compile, can you see why?\" .. It was missing a semicolon.\n\non a related note, I write scala on daily basis but scala is not that well\nsuited for coding interviews, I found.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 15511829,
        "hacker": "rwallace",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 296,
        "comment": "What would the attribute columns consist of? My experience has been with named\ncolumns defined individually by humans, of which I've never seen more than a\nfew hundred; how do you get tens of thousands? Are they a different kind of\nthing?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.180"
    },
    {
        "id": 8684256,
        "hacker": "rwallace",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 296,
        "comment": "Reflection is like profanity: it has legitimate uses, but excessive and\ngratuitous use thereof should be frowned on. Save it for when you mean it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.354"
    },
    {
        "id": 17756445,
        "hacker": "rwallace",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 296,
        "comment": "Oh, to clarify, when I talk about that, I'm not talking about temperature\ntolerance - that's really more of a secondary byproduct - but metabolic\ndemands. A warm-blooded (i.e. fast metabolism) animal needs an order of\nmagnitude more food than a cold-blooded (slow metabolism) animal.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.120"
    },
    {
        "id": 16405366,
        "hacker": "rwallace",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 296,
        "comment": "I remember looking for such a thing and not finding it. Maybe it was added\nlater? I tried an early version of Wave, briefly.\n\nIf it was indeed added later, this is an example of something Joel Spolsky\ncautioned against: don't do a huge marketing blitz for version 1.0 of your\nproduct. Aim for user count to increase in step with product maturity.\n\nThough admittedly this might be hard to avoid with a product that has strong\nnetwork effects.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.080"
    },
    {
        "id": 13238095,
        "hacker": "rwallace",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 296,
        "comment": "If the proposed solution is to scatter a zillion tons of lead around the\nplace, I suggest we go back to burning coal instead. It would be less\nenvironmentally damaging.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 18967488,
        "hacker": "rikkus",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 297,
        "comment": "There are regulations[1] in the UK too.\n\nWe've had new UPVC windows installed over the past few years and they've all\ngot hidden 'trickle' vents.\n\n[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/ventilation-appro...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.120"
    },
    {
        "id": 18553700,
        "hacker": "rikkus",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 297,
        "comment": "I switch between iPhone and MacBook sometimes. My flow is usually turning off\nBluetooth on the iPhone then selecting the AirPods from the MacBook, or\nsimilar. It doesn’t feel like much of a pain but it does seem like there could\nbe an easier way. If the Bluetooth icon/menu on each device could have a ‘move\nAirPods to iPhone/MacBook/iPad’ option, and maybe a ‘move from’ on other\ndevices.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.044"
    },
    {
        "id": 16331020,
        "hacker": "rikkus",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 297,
        "comment": "After watching various films where organisations are able to pull up feeds\nfrom cameras absolutely anywhere in the world, I'm wondering how long it will\nbe before there's a mandatory internet connection and back door on all\n'security' cameras sold.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.130"
    },
    {
        "id": 19524682,
        "hacker": "tantalor",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 298,
        "comment": "\"we hypothesized that there may be a seizure-specific olfactory component that\nwould be common to different individuals and types of seizures\"\n\nVague & untestable. This is not a scientific hypothesis because it's not\nfalsifiable.\n\nIt's missing a suggested explanation of the phenomenon. What happens between\nthe seizure and the smell? Magic? Fairies? How could a seizure cause an odor?\n\nThe study fails to establish that the dogs are relying exclusively on odor.\nFor all we know there could something else happening. For example, we know\ndogs can sense magnetic fields. What if the seizure patient releases some kind\nof ferromagnetic material which the dogs can detect magnetically?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.056"
    },
    {
        "id": 18273920,
        "hacker": "tantalor",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 298,
        "comment": "https://vimeo.com/239238204\n\nVideo shows physical material tests and simulated structural tests. What else\nwould you suggest?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11534558,
        "hacker": "tantalor",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 298,
        "comment": "Huh? \"Amazon\" is the 6th word of the title.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9490825,
        "hacker": "tantalor",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 298,
        "comment": "Academia vs. industry; or, Who pays the bills?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3274482,
        "hacker": "tantalor",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 298,
        "comment": "Why not just use a recursive default dict?\n\nhttp://kentsjohnson.com/kk/00013.html\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4626923,
        "hacker": "dhimes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 299,
        "comment": "When those white breadboards came out that allowed you to wire entire circuits\nwith no soldering at all it changed my life. Until then we would wire wrap, or\nsolder to pieces of copper wire used as posts stuck in, erm, breadboard. chips\nalways went into a socket holder whose leads were then soldered to the\nbreadboard (or wire-wrapped).\n\nMy first was a HeathKit digital electronics course which contained power\nsupplies, sources of +5/0 V, and leds to read output.\n\nMan, this takes me back...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 116920,
        "hacker": "dhimes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 299,
        "comment": "Get a good legal dictionary, and any time you think to yourself, \"I wonder why\nthey used that particular word there?\" LOOK IT UP! You'll be surprised. This\nis not something to do in the evening over a beer. A textbook wouldn't be a\nbad idea, either. Or, at least a trusted online reference.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.035"
    },
    {
        "id": 358798,
        "hacker": "dhimes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 299,
        "comment": "Hey, now that brings about an interesting question: If we were to discover the\ncorrect view of the universe, but that view would necessarily brings about our\nown demise, do we tell the world the correct view?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.367"
    },
    {
        "id": 423681,
        "hacker": "dhimes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 299,
        "comment": "That is quite frightening.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 1401118,
        "hacker": "dhimes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 299,
        "comment": "Flash cookie control:\n\n    \n    \n        alias playFlash='chmod 777 ~/.macromedia/Flash_Player/\\#SharedObjects'\n    \n        alias clearFlash='rm -rf ~/.macromedia/Flash_Player/\\#SharedObjects/*'\n    \n        alias stopFlash='chmod 555 ~/.macromedia/Flash_Player/\\#SharedObjects'\n    \n        alias showFlash='ls -l ~/.macromedia/Flash_Player/\\#SharedObjects'\n    \n        alias .cFlash='cd ~/.macromedia/Flash_Player/\\#SharedObjects'\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10880460,
        "hacker": "dhimes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 299,
        "comment": "Because it is old and wrong. Just a way to keep my fellow HNers from wasting\ntheir time.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 2377918,
        "hacker": "dhimes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 299,
        "comment": "I wonder if the folks who wrote the TOS for these sites even know what the\n_www_ stands for in their URL? This is ridiculous, and the first court that\nupholds this nonsense should be ashamed of itself.\n\nReminds me of the apocryphal girls who run around in see through tops and say\n\"don't look at my breasts!\"\n\nI mean, I totally get it if they have a paywall and they don't want their\ncontent released into the wild. But a public web page? C'mon.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.039"
    },
    {
        "id": 13273945,
        "hacker": "dhimes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 299,
        "comment": "Yeah but if you start a project like that it's difficult to make progress :)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13167309,
        "hacker": "dhimes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 299,
        "comment": "It might have something to do with the business you're in. If you are b2b in\ncertain areas, innovation isn't as highly valued as reliability. In fact it\ncan be downright disruptive.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.187"
    },
    {
        "id": 4247865,
        "hacker": "spudlyo",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 300,
        "comment": "Haha. Ranting on the second page is cheaper than explaining my emacs\npersecution complex to my therapist.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.033"
    },
    {
        "id": 6005210,
        "hacker": "spudlyo",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 300,
        "comment": "Internal security is often an afterthought. Even a neophyte hacker could find\npurchase in such fertile ground.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 763142,
        "hacker": "spudlyo",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 300,
        "comment": "It's a rite of passage.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18408789,
        "hacker": "duxup",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 301,
        "comment": "This reminds me of a company I worked at where they deiced people were\nspending too much on travel. So they came out with new rules about travel\nexpenses every 6 months until large swaths of people simply couldn't travel\n(me included).\n\nBut the problem wasn't solved at all because the bulk of the absurd spending\nwas caused by people who the rules didn't apply to....\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.010"
    },
    {
        "id": 17988711,
        "hacker": "duxup",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 301,
        "comment": "I'm tempted to move from Android to an Apple phone partly for that reason.\n\nI'm tired of the endless android situations where an app seems to be able to\ndo whatever regardless of permissions... and permissions can't really be\nmanaged anyway. I also don't belive Google will ever get a handle on those\npermissions / privacy, they just don't care to.\n\nIt doesn't help that google killed the nexus line and now we have pixels that\nare premium priced anyway so I may as well consider Apple where I didn't\nbefore.\n\nThe camera is also a big deal to me so a lot of the \"hey it's not a pixel but\"\noptions just don't do it for me.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.004"
    },
    {
        "id": 18235777,
        "hacker": "duxup",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 301,
        "comment": "Was Lehman Brothers really an intentional \"example\" or was just the first one\nto go and nobody was ready to act?\n\nI got the impression that they just weren't ready to respond and it was less\nso \"hey let these guys fall to set an example\".\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.137"
    },
    {
        "id": 20314247,
        "hacker": "duxup",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 301,
        "comment": "I'm happy to subscribe digitally to NYT and a couple other news sources (some\nwith walls, some not).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.225"
    },
    {
        "id": 19702445,
        "hacker": "duxup",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 301,
        "comment": "That sounds like it would produce pretty vicious cycle.\n\nBad credit, can't get job... can't get job, can't improve credit...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.483"
    },
    {
        "id": 20232760,
        "hacker": "duxup",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 301,
        "comment": "Yeah it seemed like you could put a lot of work into managing your circles ...\nand it wasn't apparent that you would get get nothing out of it until you did\nit.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 6794969,
        "hacker": "dpeck",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 302,
        "comment": "Chance favors the prepared mind.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7437266,
        "hacker": "dpeck",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 302,
        "comment": "related, Pundit provides some similar functionality in a very minimal package\nhttps://github.com/elabs/pundit\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.043"
    },
    {
        "id": 9889606,
        "hacker": "dpeck",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 302,
        "comment": "Not a user, and never have myself, but calling it non-scientific seems to be\nquite a stretch.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9891211,
        "hacker": "dpeck",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 302,
        "comment": "perhaps, I was thinking stuff like provigil/modafinil.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13424058,
        "hacker": "giancarlostoro",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 303,
        "comment": "That website screwed up my scrolling on Chrome, works fine with scroll wheel\nbut the trackpad two-finger scrolling just does weird side scrolling.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.042"
    },
    {
        "id": 14224139,
        "hacker": "giancarlostoro",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 303,
        "comment": "If you have total control you can cheat a little and not do other things like\nanalyzing what's being displayed on the screen, but that's just my thinking.\nIt might be more valuable to some to actually analyze the data on the screen.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.037"
    },
    {
        "id": 16600226,
        "hacker": "giancarlostoro",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 303,
        "comment": "Another public DNS is available from the IPredator.se guys as well. Forgot\nwhat page on their site they had it under though. They also run some tor\nnodes. They're one of my favorite VPN services. The staff is very welcoming on\ntheir IRC server too.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.275"
    },
    {
        "id": 17200871,
        "hacker": "giancarlostoro",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 303,
        "comment": "I hate to say it but first that sounds highly too stubborn that I wanna say it\nsounds incompetent. Secondly there's still room to rename and if they want it\nto go anywhere sooner is bettee than later. Call is Weasel for all anyone\ncares (yeah I know IceWeasel... But still better than flat out WAMP). The\nworse part is some people might completely dislike WAMP altogether given some\nUnix only devs out there and might never see this due to poor naming.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.084"
    },
    {
        "id": 21076573,
        "hacker": "giancarlostoro",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 303,
        "comment": "I find it so weird that they call this a commenting system. It is a forum or\nmessage board. Last thing I would call it is a commenting system. Never heard\nanybody calling vBulletin a commenting system.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 10395911,
        "hacker": "giancarlostoro",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 303,
        "comment": "I have no idea what any of this is about. Anyone care to fill me in?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7008417,
        "hacker": "bliti",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 304,
        "comment": "There are some people who simply look down at others because they are not as\n\"smart\" as they are. Experience has taught me that these type of people spend\ntoo much time writing comments on the internet rather than improving their\nskills (they are already \"smart\", they don't need it). I sometimes wonder why\nI even comment on HN, because somebody will get offended and do a crusade\nagainst me. Even to the point of emailing me saying how stupid I am (true\nstory). In reality, I'm never ever the smartest guy in the room. But I do work\nhard to learn and do things correctly.\n\nThere is also the belief of the 1%. People seem to think that there are these\nmagical programmers who are better than anybody out there. This makes a lot of\nthose who have drinked the SV kool-aid look down on others. In reality, all\nprogrammers are smart. Just in different areas/aspects. There is no 1%. Just a\nbunch of people trying to write code and innovate.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.061"
    },
    {
        "id": 7775075,
        "hacker": "bliti",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 304,
        "comment": "There are very few cases where MySQL or PostgreSQL can't handle. And for those\nexists Redis. Do yourself a favor and use one of those.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.260"
    },
    {
        "id": 6310751,
        "hacker": "bliti",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 304,
        "comment": "SEEKING WORK - [AMERICAN CITIZEN] [REMOTE] [WILL TRAVEL]\n\nWhat sets me apart from the rest?\n\nSimple. My focus is on delivering what you want. When you want it.\n\nProfessional experience with Python, Django, Flask, Ruby, Rails, Sinatra,\nJquery, .NET, JAVA, and more. My skills are all around, and am able to work on\nthe backend as well as on the front end.\n\nPast projects have had me building:\n\n\\- E-commerce platforms (with stripe/paypal integration)\n\n\\- Advertising Networks\n\n\\- Automation\n\n\\- Web Scrapping\n\n\\- Telephony systems (with twilio integration)\n\n\\- Business intelligence dashboards (with d3.js and justgauges.js)\n\n\\- Multiple API based systems\n\nIf you need a responsible freelancer. Who will not run away with your money.\nWho will complete the project as required. Then you should contact me through\nmy page on: http://bliti.github.io\n\nWhile you are there, check out some of my latest open source projects. Most\nare new, but you should make note of them. And yes, I am an open source\ncontributor.\n\nAgencies are welcome to inquire.\n\nHave a full-time position? Let's talk.\n\nhttp://bliti.github.io\n\nPS. I deliver. (:\n\nGithub pages seem to be down. Go to my profile and get my email address from\nthere.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 7833529,
        "hacker": "jader201",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 305,
        "comment": "This is what I like about the \"Who wants to be hired?\" threads. You're more\nlikely to get relevant hits because (hopefully) the prospective companies are\nreviewing your skills before reaching out.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.275"
    },
    {
        "id": 9297179,
        "hacker": "jader201",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 305,
        "comment": "I guess, if your philosophy is \"bad coverage is still coverage\". But hasn't\nthis happened with an Amazon product announcement before, and backfired?\nAmazon Echo comes to mind.\n\nNot even sure that was around April fools, but my point is, bad coverage can,\nand has often, backfired.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 3687885,
        "hacker": "jader201",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 305,
        "comment": "It looks like this is an oversimplification. The graphics and text are doing\nstuff independently of each other -- this illustrates that the graphics and\ntext are moving together, and they're not.\n\nI would be curious to see how that -- the graphics and text moving\nindependently -- really works.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.006"
    },
    {
        "id": 8095502,
        "hacker": "rurounijones",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 306,
        "comment": "Or disabled due to wind speeds being too high.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.055"
    },
    {
        "id": 8301599,
        "hacker": "rurounijones",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 306,
        "comment": "Helloooo Japanese summers.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 8392978,
        "hacker": "rurounijones",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 306,
        "comment": "> By the way, you didn't really address \"Cars are SLOW\" part.\n\nNot scientific but: Top Gear's race in Japan for example.\n\nCar absolutely obliterated the public transportation network which included\nthe Shinkansen (ignoring the \"I turned the satnav off accidentally and lost an\nhour\" bit).\n\nAlthough hard to determine just how much Clarkson was breaking the speed\nlimits..\n\nBut it shows that direct point to point travel can make up for slower average\nspeed.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.051"
    },
    {
        "id": 5658058,
        "hacker": "rurounijones",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 306,
        "comment": "> I'm not sure about this site...it would be nice if someone like the EFF ran\n> it and got actual lawyers to look at these. In this case:\n\nI agree with everything you said but isn't it pathetic that we require a\ntrained lawyer to be able to interpret something that affects a staggering\namount of people.\n\nA ToS shouldn't have to require the above, I also kind of like the idea of a\nlayman having a stab at it, I would love to have a site that lists ToSes and\nallows wiki style discussions on certain points (Think Github pull request\ncommenting). If only to highlight how bloody stupid it is that no one can\nunderstand or can agree on them.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.036"
    },
    {
        "id": 13736882,
        "hacker": "gjvc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 307,
        "comment": "Think long term.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 14724518,
        "hacker": "gjvc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 307,
        "comment": "When did this happen, and what frameworks did the throwing out?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 8691323,
        "hacker": "gjvc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 307,
        "comment": "if they mean \"turn the currently fat, repetitive scripts into slim wrappers\nwhich call into a well-structured collection of well-composed classes of\nobjects, which closely match the problem domain, thus promoting code reuse,\nand fix once, benefit everywhere behavior\", then good.\n\ndifficult to comment properly without more context.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.020"
    },
    {
        "id": 7905797,
        "hacker": "stephencanon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 308,
        "comment": "anymore is a regional thing; you'll hear it in pockets of Appalachia from\nwestern PA down to Kentucky and Tennessee.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.078"
    },
    {
        "id": 8551690,
        "hacker": "stephencanon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 308,
        "comment": "Exactly the same as I would make if I weren't working remotely. I'm doing the\nsame work, and it has the same value to my employer. (If anything, one might\nargue that remote employees should be paid more, since the overhead costs are\noften less).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.048"
    },
    {
        "id": 5375928,
        "hacker": "stephencanon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 308,
        "comment": "I have no doubt that all the big unix vendors will support C11 (if they don't\nalready).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3811034,
        "hacker": "draegtun",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 309,
        "comment": "Ditto for Perl. However Perl uses _last_ instead _break_.\n\nNB. Since Perl 5.10 it does have _continue_ & _break_ in its _given/when_\n(topicalizer) switch block.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 16468338,
        "hacker": "draegtun",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 309,
        "comment": "Pharo & Squeak (and I suspect also most commercial Smalltalk versions) are\nanother dynamically typed language that have a high grade JIT solution.\n\nsee: http://opensmalltalk.org/\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.220"
    },
    {
        "id": 1767968,
        "hacker": "draegtun",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 309,
        "comment": "Not sure myself but it can also be written like this:\n\n    \n    \n        builder.person do |b| \n            b.name \"Jim\"\n            b.phone \"555-1234\"\n        end\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 792323,
        "hacker": "zach",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 310,
        "comment": "Citation needed. Here, let me Google \"prison recidivism non-violent\" for you\n-- a 1997 study which suggests that only about 15% of nonviolent offenders are\nreturned to prison within three years for violent offenses [PDF]:\n\nhttp://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/pnoesp.pdf\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 5724823,
        "hacker": "zach",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 310,
        "comment": "This is very nearly a deal-breaker for me, and the current response is\ntypically \"yeah, it's verbose, deal with it\":\n\nhttps://github.com/fish-shell/fish-shell/issues/587\n\nI use Rails with rbenv, a common package which adds shell commands to control\nwhich version of Ruby is used. There is a fish port of it, so when you run the\nvery common command \"rake\" it invokes a fish function which sets up the right\nenvironment. And when you do run rake, you often need to set environment\nvariables to set one-time options for the procedure you're invoking.\n\nNow the trap is set for the would-be fish user. Because you're actually using\nthe fish shell to customize a command, you can't just punt to env with \"env\nVERSION=20130411222645 rake db:migrate:down\" because you actually want to run\nthe fish function, not an executable.\n\nSo for now, I'm setting environment variables at the command line and\nunsetting them afterwards. It's really getting old, especially because it\nloses context in my command history. I think I'll probably ditch fish if I\ncan't find a workaround for this, so any suggestions are appreciated.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.019"
    },
    {
        "id": 3725820,
        "hacker": "zach",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 310,
        "comment": "On Instagram, \"picture talking\" is very common since the service is completely\ngeared towards pictures but people still want to use words from time to time.\n\nSo to express a thought or thank friends, Instagram users have to find a way\nto put words onto a picture. The most common is to write a note in Notes, take\na screenshot and upload that. But on the stylish communication medium that\nInstagram is, it can look a little gauche. So people will often upload\npictures of handwritten notes, etc. which have some class but not everyone\nwants to go to that much effort.\n\nThe easiest thing is to offer a 612x612 template and the ability to show a PNG\nthat users could then save to their Camera Roll and then upload to Instagram.\nIf you can connect with the user's Instagram account and let them upload from\nInstagram like Chute does, even better!\n\nDisclaimer: been totally cranking on my own words-on-pictures app for the last\nfew weeks — congrats!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.123"
    },
    {
        "id": 14100698,
        "hacker": "Taniwha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 311,
        "comment": "I've mostly worked at home since my son was born (he's 26 now). I used to go\nin one day a week, I worked for startups for years and would start full time,\ndrop off to 4->3->2 days a week. These days I never go in (I live 10,000km\naway at the moment, it's no longer a 1 hour drive in the Valley).\n\nI think there's a few things you have to realise about working at home: \\- you\nget to avoid almost all office politics \\- you will eventually lose at office\npolitics\n\nEssentially you need to have a manager who will step up and root for you, and\nyou guys need to talk so he/she knows where your head is at\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.089"
    },
    {
        "id": 15209624,
        "hacker": "Taniwha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 311,
        "comment": "10 years ago I built a streetlight system, we implemented and tested the\nprotocol by build a simple simulator in a qt app and embedding the same\nsoftware stack inside it, it allowed us to create models that modelled x/y\nlocations, distance signal drop off, random noise, exit points etc\n\nLarge randomly placed simulations only started to slow with ~15k nodes ... In\nother words it's not hard\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.118"
    },
    {
        "id": 20194472,
        "hacker": "Taniwha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 311,
        "comment": "maybe they allow XXX1X (ie 39 but not 38)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18500777,
        "hacker": "ggm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 312,
        "comment": "You know we've been here before, right? I mean, lighthill report, Ray\nKurzeweil is a serial offender for over thirty years, the singularity is\naround the corner thing, outrageous claims for fMRI, self driving cars. Over\nhyped ibm Watson which now health professions are talking about misdiagnosis\nproblems.\n\nSure. We have google image match and better colorisartion and some\nimprovements in language processing, and good cancer detection on x-rays.\nThese are huge. But hype is, alas, making engineering increments look like\ncult.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.084"
    },
    {
        "id": 18645500,
        "hacker": "ggm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 312,
        "comment": "Bicycles, the upside of increased fractures is better cardio health. In Qld,\nhelmet laws mean less brain injury but now that prevents some people using\nbikes. Some epidemiologists say its not clear which has worse outcomes: the\npeople with horric brain injury, or the healthier people with less cardio\nrisk.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.099"
    },
    {
        "id": 18893549,
        "hacker": "ggm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 312,
        "comment": "I hassled decor (home plastic container company) about BPA and they said their\nfood grade containers had never had BPA.\n\nOddly they saw no need to market on this.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 19846663,
        "hacker": "ggm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 312,
        "comment": "Anyone else here remember \"eunice\" on Vax/VMS?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20330417,
        "hacker": "ggm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 312,
        "comment": "It's time for denialist policies to be repudiated and to vote denialist\ngovernments out of office\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20367468,
        "hacker": "ggm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 312,
        "comment": "Eben is usually responsive. I would love pointers to any acknowledgement this\nis a correct analysis.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 5813847,
        "hacker": "chatmasta",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 313,
        "comment": "I agree completely. No matter what started the protests or who the parties\nbehind the protest are, the fact that people are willing to withstand tear gas\nand water cannons shows that they have something worth fighting for.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 8024986,
        "hacker": "chatmasta",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 313,
        "comment": "I wonder how a website like this would convert if you were selling a product.\nI imagine if you're selling a web app, where design matters, conversions would\nbe shit. But if you're selling something where it doesn't matter how your\nwebsite looks? I bet this could convert fantastically.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 10041803,
        "hacker": "chatmasta",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 313,
        "comment": "> If these costs are being borne evenly, then it's complete societal waste.\n\nThat doesn't make sense.\n\nYou are saying because User reads Content, Advertiser pays Content, and User\npays Advertiser, that the middle step of Advertiser paying Content is\nunnecessary, because User could pay Content.\n\nSimple counterexample: I like reading techcrunch, but would never pay for it.\nBut I might see an ad for a new device that I like and _would_ pay for, _on_\ntechcrunch. If I click through the ad and buy it, then everyone wins.\nTechcrunch makes money from me, who would never pay them directly, because the\nadvertiser pays them, and the advertiser makes money, because I buy their\nproduct.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.005"
    },
    {
        "id": 12291291,
        "hacker": "chatmasta",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 313,
        "comment": "Ultimately it's up to you, of course. But the most obvious use case would be\nwhen you're building something explicitly modeled onto a graph, like a social\nnetwork.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 1177253,
        "hacker": "yumraj",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 314,
        "comment": "Personally, I'm really amazed that some people, both below and in comments to\nthat article, are finding themselves siding with the student.\n\nIMO the prof's email was excellent. He conveyed his point across very nicely\nwithout showing even a small hint of irritation or annoyance.\n\nThe part copied below, for me, really sums it up. This student is an immature\njackass and s/he really needs growing up. S/he first made a mistake and then\nhad the audacity of justifying his/her action. Personally I would hate to have\na person like that in my team.\n\nQuoted part: _Just so I’ve got this straight…you started in one class, left\n15-20 minutes into it (stood up, walked out mid-lecture), went to another\nclass (walked in 20 minutes late), left that class (again, presumably, in the\nmiddle of the lecture), and then came to my class. At that point (walking in\nan hour late) I asked you to come to the next class which “bothered” you._\n\nTo the folks who are siding with the student: Find out who s/he was, hire\nhim/her and then lets see what your reaction is when the moron walks in late\nto meetings, customer calls, doesn't deliver on time etc. and then when you\nfire him/her, sues you..\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.027"
    },
    {
        "id": 1478688,
        "hacker": "yumraj",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 314,
        "comment": "Not 100%, but rather 90% refundable. Link:\nhttp://store.apple.com/Catalog/US/Images/salespolicies.html\n\n[search for restocking fee]\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 16590517,
        "hacker": "yumraj",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 314,
        "comment": "Do you mind sharing the contents of your car earthquake kit?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 17577413,
        "hacker": "jandrese",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 315,
        "comment": "What's the use of a lunar orbiting space station though? What science can you\ndo in orbit of the moon that you can't do in orbit of the Earth?\n\nBuilding a space station in Low Earth Orbit nearly killed NASA's budget for 20\nyears. Lofting all of that mass to lunar orbit would have added considerably\nto the cost. At least with the landers we got to bring back some regolith.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.080"
    },
    {
        "id": 12508124,
        "hacker": "jandrese",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 315,
        "comment": "That's a risky position IMHO. You create a situation where it becomes\nprofitable to threaten to erect a tall structure in order to extort money from\nthe neighbors.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13309864,
        "hacker": "jandrese",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 315,
        "comment": "The whole point of the patent system is to make sure ideas aren't locked up so\nwe can advance as a society (something the Copyright office has forgotten), so\nonce they expire they are in the Public Domain forever.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.233"
    },
    {
        "id": 21220562,
        "hacker": "jandrese",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 315,
        "comment": "Unrelated question: Is there an Ignobel for Computer Science?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20265675,
        "hacker": "jandrese",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 315,
        "comment": "Given the arbitrary blocks to Google from the Great Firewall of China, I don't\nsee how it can compete in the first place.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.317"
    },
    {
        "id": 19912627,
        "hacker": "jandrese",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 315,
        "comment": "Didn't it just replace a patchwork mess of systems used by countries\nbeforehand?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.175"
    },
    {
        "id": 19504394,
        "hacker": "jandrese",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 315,
        "comment": "Also a willingness to debug COBOL programs written in the 80s to deal with\nstuff like Unicode on imported records.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18666918,
        "hacker": "jandrese",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 315,
        "comment": "Or:\n\n\"This is just an unmarked taxi.\"\n\n\"Except hailing/billing isn't stuck in the past so you don't have to get lucky\nto find an empty one on the street or call a surly dispatcher and wait 45\nminutes. You also get the bill up front so you know how much it will cost\nbefore you even say yes. You can always pay by credit card too, you'll never\narrive at the destination and then only be informed that the credit card\nreader is 'broken' and the cabbie can only accept cash. Added bonus: it's\nabout half the price of a regular taxi.\"\n\n\"Cool\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.003"
    },
    {
        "id": 17323642,
        "hacker": "jandrese",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 315,
        "comment": "The -w option in cut isn't universal which makes it unreliable for the\nextremely common use case of fields separated by arbitrary whitespace.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 14971664,
        "hacker": "jandrese",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 315,
        "comment": "A house would have to be staggeringly overpriced for a 1% fixed loan with no\ndown and no points to not make sense. Especially if they qualified for a prime\nrate.\n\nHell, if I had that loan available I would totally take it and run with it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.116"
    },
    {
        "id": 11400362,
        "hacker": "jandrese",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 315,
        "comment": "This is the perpetual problem with these no-name SBCs. All of the\ndocumentation and tech support is over in China, and even getting answers to\nsimple questions can be impossible.\n\nThis is why the Raspberry Pi remains so popular despite having worse\nspecs/higher price point than a multitude of competitors. The large English\nspeaking community built up around it means you can usually find answers to\nany weird questions you might have about it. Usually some sample code too.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.139"
    },
    {
        "id": 11036908,
        "hacker": "jandrese",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 315,
        "comment": "I thought it was a pretty clever way to kill off the H-1B visa program. The\ndownside is that the end result is probably just more companies outsourcing\nentire departments instead.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.229"
    },
    {
        "id": 5493624,
        "hacker": "jandrese",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 315,
        "comment": "I want to like DDD, but it has never been stable for me. Annoying it has a\ntendency to take down my Window Manager or even X.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.478"
    },
    {
        "id": 18677475,
        "hacker": "monocasa",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 316,
        "comment": "Nutrient requirements don't increase nearly as much as caloric requirements\nunder high activity. Additionally, vegan diets with enough nutrients tend to\nbe calorie heavy.\n\nSo flipping that around, my point is that it's difficult to have a healthy\nvegan diet that gives you enough nutrients, without an extremely high activity\nlevel.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.040"
    },
    {
        "id": 16140707,
        "hacker": "monocasa",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 316,
        "comment": "In most contexts, the RSP handles all T&L, making it analogous to modern\nvertex shaders.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.350"
    },
    {
        "id": 17093093,
        "hacker": "monocasa",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 316,
        "comment": "Hahaha, I've absolutely learned a little written Chinese for reading\ndatasheets. It's not that bad either, resistor for instance is \"electricity\npushing back device\".\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.081"
    },
    {
        "id": 17741924,
        "hacker": "monocasa",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 316,
        "comment": "Except the numbers of human counters increases linearly with the number of\nballots cast. And the counting generally happens in a room with several people\nfrom multiple counting the same subtotals.\n\nSo no, not the same as human ballot counters at all.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.007"
    },
    {
        "id": 17812389,
        "hacker": "monocasa",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 316,
        "comment": "A lot of good law is made protecting terrible people.\n\nFor instance Ernesto Miranda of \"Miranda rights\" was retried with his\nconfession marked as not admissible, and was still convicted of kidnapping and\nrape.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.067"
    },
    {
        "id": 19636769,
        "hacker": "monocasa",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 316,
        "comment": "> I don’t mean that it’s physically impossible. I mean that it would have\n> created an enormous international incident if the CIA abducted Assange\n> without the cooperation of the Swedish Police, or if the Swedish Police had\n> collaborated with the CIA to disappear a suspect in an ongoing criminal\n> investigation. Take a look at the case of Ahmed Agiza and Muhammad al-Zery\n> in 2006. The rendition of two Egyptians that no-one has heard of caused\n> enough of a diplomatic incident that Sweden stopped CIA rendition flights.\n\nI mean... it wasn't all that bad in the Agiza and al-Zery case for Sweden. No\nheads rolled in the Swedish government over the matter. And there were\nliterally Swedish personnel assisting.\n\nDo you have any evidence that Sweden has stopped allowing rendition flights?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 8903907,
        "hacker": "noelwelsh",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 317,
        "comment": "Replace marketers with, say, blacks, Jews, or any other minority group and all\nyou have here is the standard template of the bigot wrapped up in fancy words\nwith a technical twist. \"I like gays, some of my best friends are gays, but\n...\"\n\nThe first paragraph assures us the author respects marketers, and then\nsuddenly it's \"marketing people and SEO people and whatever people doing their\nbranding and paradigm shoving and optimizing through pipelines or down funnels\nor up pyramids of pigs with too much mascara\". I can no more get behind\nstereotyping of marketers than I can any other group in society.\n\nAt least the author has the insight to admit they are being a dick.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.008"
    },
    {
        "id": 10751259,
        "hacker": "noelwelsh",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 317,
        "comment": "Glitches as demonstrated via the diamond pattern can be avoided by traversing\nthe graph in topological order. This was demonstrated in Greg Cooper's PhD\nthesis: http://cs.brown.edu/~greg/\n\nTransactions, as I understand them, solve a different issue. This is the issue\nof multiple inputs to the graph occurring at the same time.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6809497,
        "hacker": "noelwelsh",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 317,
        "comment": "Let me clarify.\n\nIf you see a big group of people talking they probably all know each other (or\nthere will be one person, such as a speaker at an event, holding court).\nGetting into such a group will be awkward. You'll either break up their banter\nwhile you do introductions, or you'll stand there smiling like an idiot while\nnot getting all the in-jokes and being mostly unable to contribute. (If there\nis one person holding court you can work your way in, but these conversations\nare rarely productive.)\n\nHence the rest. I'm not suggesting you wait to ambush a particular person when\nthey leave a group. I'm suggesting you talk to whoever happens to be behind\nyou in line. Similarly, with couples or single people it is easier to have\nthose initial conversations where you search for common ground.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.166"
    },
    {
        "id": 17408372,
        "hacker": "noelwelsh",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 317,
        "comment": "I use a trackball in my right hand. I use a trackball as it's more ergonomic,\nand I've had wrist pain in the past from using a mouse. I use my right hand\nbecause the oppressive burden of living in a rightie dominated world has made\nme somewhat ambidextrous. I switch to a mouse in my left-hand for the\noccasional times I'm gaming.\n\nMy last two trackballs have been imports from Japan. Apparently somebody\nclaims a patent on the trackball, and sued Logitech, who have since ceased\nproduction of them.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.124"
    },
    {
        "id": 13252670,
        "hacker": "eganist",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 318,
        "comment": "This is also why smart money in appsec is focused on langsec and framework-\nintegrated security controls, such as by forcing security patterns (e.g. html-\ncontext output encoding) by default and by compelling developers to work\nharder or, should they decide to break the rules, to do so more visibly.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.183"
    },
    {
        "id": 11281171,
        "hacker": "eganist",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 318,
        "comment": "Entirely offtopic, but how is it that the xkcd blog suffers from such a\nterrible spam comment problem?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 11315240,
        "hacker": "eganist",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 318,
        "comment": "Thanks. There are plenty of others trying to apply the YC model in other more\nniche areas (Mach37 comes to mind here in DC), so it's neat seeing the\ndirection you and the team will continue to take.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.192"
    },
    {
        "id": 15176150,
        "hacker": "DonHopkins",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 319,
        "comment": "Something happens later that I'm not going to say anything about. ;) Give it\nanother try!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.156"
    },
    {
        "id": 14434759,
        "hacker": "DonHopkins",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 319,
        "comment": "I think the more important goal than being completely autonomous is killing\nand maiming as few people as possible. Cars depend on a lot of immobile \"base\nstations\" like gas and charging stations, traffic lights, drive through fast\nfood restaurants, and the roads themselves. Until cars can refine their own\npetroleum or generate their own electricity, replicate their own fast food,\nand pave their own roads [1], they're never going to be purely autonomous.\n\nMy question is how much do a bunch of cars an intersection all using LIDAR at\nthe same time interfere with each other? Would it make sense for them to\nwirelessly share their models, and share an even better model made possible by\nhigh resolution LIDAR placed on poles like street lights? Then approaching\ncars could see around corners, and know about otherwise invisible oncoming\ntraffic.\n\nI'm not suggesting that every intersection and long stretch of road through\nthe desert should be festooned with LIDAR base stations. But how about\nstarting with every busy intersection on Market street, for example?\n\n[1] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hG7-AQfbjE\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.145"
    },
    {
        "id": 10874473,
        "hacker": "DonHopkins",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 319,
        "comment": "Is there such a thing as \"architecture ground controllers\"?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10219670,
        "hacker": "DonHopkins",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 319,
        "comment": "I hoped this adjacent HN discussion [1] was about a new updated version of the\nword fuck, but was disappointed:\n\nF* reworked and released as v0.9.0 (lambda-the-ultimate.org)\n\n[1] https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=10217199\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.338"
    },
    {
        "id": 9107206,
        "hacker": "DonHopkins",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 319,
        "comment": "Back in 2003 at the Stupid Fun Club, I helped Will Wright make these hidden\ncamera one minute movies about robots roaming the streets and restaurants of\nOakland and having their feelings hurt:\n\nEmpathy: http://www.donhopkins.com/home/RobotMovies/Empathy.mpg\n\nServitude: http://www.donhopkins.com/home/RobotMovies/Servitude.mpg\n\nOne Minute Movies: http://www.allentownproductions.com/project.php?p=nbc\n\nEdit: oops, fixed the mpg links -- sorry!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.199"
    },
    {
        "id": 20007960,
        "hacker": "DonHopkins",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 319,
        "comment": "Speaking of weird retrocomputing BASIC features, does anyone know why\nDECSYSTEM 10's and DECSYSTEM 20's BASIC had a \"LISTREVERSE\" command?\n\nYes, it actually did exactly what it sounds like!\n\nChalk one up for DEC and BASIC. What other programming languages support that\nfeature, huh?\n\nNow all you need is a COMEFROM and COMESUB and RUNREVERSE (or NUR) statements,\nand you can write reversible BASIC programs!\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reversible_computing\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counter-Clock_World\n\nhttps://imgur.com/a/Bt40M\n\n    \n    \n        DECSYSTEM 20 BASIC User's Guide: LISTREVERSE command\n    \n        LISTREVERSE\n        LISTNHREVERSE\n    \n        LISTREVERSE and LISTNHREVERSE print the contents of the\n        user's memory area in order of descending line numbers. \n        LISTREVERSE precedes the output with a heading,\n        LISTNHREVERSE eliminates the heading.\n    \n        LISTREVERSE\n    \n        EQUIV             10:53                      13-NOV-75\n    \n        40    END\n        35    PRINT \"THE EQUIVALENT CURRENT IS\",I, \" AMPERES\"\n        25    I=E1/R\n        10    INPUT R\n        5     INPUT E1\n    \n        READY\n    \n\nhttp://bitsavers.org/www.computer.museum.uq.edu.au/pdf/DEC-1...\n\nhttp://bitsavers.org/www.computer.museum.uq.edu.au/pdf/DEC-2...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.010"
    },
    {
        "id": 19285384,
        "hacker": "DonHopkins",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 319,
        "comment": "Cool -- thank you for keeping the pie rolling!\n\nI love the way the new Blender 2.80 interface (which is a whole new ball game)\nintegrates pie menu layout as a first class citizen, so you can nest any other\nkinds of user interface stuff inside of pie menus, and everything just works.\n\nHave you seen the astounding Pie Menu Editor extension? It's getting seriously\ninto HyperCard territory!\n\nhttps://blendermarket.com/products/pie-menu-editor?ref=2\n\nIt's SO much more than just just a pie menu editor: you can edit all kinds of\nblender user interfaces widgets, linear menus, dialogs, panels, key bindings,\nmacros, modal operators and properties. You can make custom control panels and\nput them into pie menus, as well as copying existing parts of the Blender user\ninterface into your own pie menus and panels! And of course you can script and\ncustomize everything with Python.\n\nhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BY-kU2IrTxk\n\nIt's really hard to convey everything it does, and the documentation and demos\nare pretty sparse, but here is a playlist with lots of examples:\n\nhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTAsqEyZnEs&index=1&list=PLs...\n\nDefining your own modal operators (interactive modes for live editing with\nvisual feedback, temporary key and mouse bindings, etc) is particularly mind\nblowing! And those are great for invoking from pie menus, enabling a very\nfluid live direct-manipulation editing style.\n\nhttps://archive.blender.org/wiki/index.php/User:Raa/Addons/P...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.192"
    },
    {
        "id": 3059327,
        "hacker": "barrkel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 320,
        "comment": "Event 500 and 501 seem like false alarms (I had never heard about them until\ntoday). I have a fairly high spec video card (AMD 5870) and when I drill into\nthe log where those events show up, I can see there's been a few of them every\nday - but I've never actually noticed any performance degradation. I would\nnever have known that they were being produced until I looked into them, and\non the basis of the lack of actual degradation, I'm confident I can forget\nabout them.\n\nVideo is fine and clear for me across a much larger range of codecs than I've\never seen on Linux (or Mac, for that matter). I normally get no more than 2%\nCPU utilization for video playback; any HD content I have is hardware\naccelerated, I expect.\n\n50/100 requests per second is meaningless without knowing the _cost_ of those\nrequests. My machine, if you ignore superscalar architecture and\nhypethreading, is capable of over 12 billion operations per second. Unless\nthese registry reads have fairly substantial costs, they're completely\nunnoticeable.\n\nMy Windows 7 machine here currently has an uptime of 48 days. I seldom reboot\nuntil the Windows Update nag gets the better of me, and I frequently turn off\nthe update service to get rid of the nag. I have 12GB of RAM, and I've never\nseen this degraded performance you speak of.\n\nI wrote my own print spooler (it actually runs on a different machine) and\nhave a bunch of tray applications: CrashPlan, DropBox, Process Explorer,\ncorporate VPN, occasionally Skype and Steam. Again, I've not noticed any\nperformance drain from these things. Not even games these days are CPU\nconstrained; with 4 cores (or 8 if you include hyperthreading) the only thing\nthat taxes my CPU is video transcoding. There's plenty of spare CPU capacity\nin games; they seldom get above 30 or 40% utilization.\n\nIf you really think Windows is odd in starving the system for non-low-priority\nrunaway processes, try running a forkbomb without ulimits in place on your\nLinux or Mac machines. But I have no difficulty running Handbrake or SuperPI\nor similar utilizing 100% CPU but still having responsiveness enough to shut\nthem down etc.\n\nIt's extraordinarily rare for me to find myself in front of a Windows machine\nwhere the UI is completely unresponsive except in cases of driver conflict or\nflaky hardware (e.g. a paging error from a bad hard drive will do horrible\nthings). I don't know why you've soured so much on Windows, or what bad\nexperience it was that pushed you over the edge, but when you bring up things\nlike registry traffic and this \"event 500/501\", I get the impression that you\nare actively looking for things you think are worth complaining about, rather\nthan pointing out things that are actually hampering your interaction. It\nhurts your credibility in my eyes, frankly.\n\n(FWIW, I was a computer technician before I became a software engineer, and\nI've been working with Windows of all varieties since about 1993, including\nthe early (3.1 and 3.51) versions of NT (almost 20 years, scary!). I've dealt\nwith thousands of machines running Windows. And for MS OSes based on NT,\nproblems have overwhelmingly been because of hardware or driver issues, almost\nnever because of OS issues.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.004"
    },
    {
        "id": 796963,
        "hacker": "barrkel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 320,
        "comment": "I don't think supporting a lot of form factors and \"price points\" (i.e.\nhardware capability) is necessarily a recipe for success. The baseline\nhardware has to be pretty capable, e.g. including a 3D graphics chip, generous\nmemory, ample storage, etc. The phone can't be too cheap, or apps will run on\nsome Android installations and not on others, leading to platform\nfragmentation.\n\nIf anything, something like Vista's machine performance score could be\nimplemented, with the lowest-scoring element being the total score.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 1042537,
        "hacker": "barrkel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 320,
        "comment": "Well... an attempted bomber comes from Yemen, now people start thinking about\nmaybe focusing attention on Yemen. Maybe Somalia too. And there are riots on\nthe streets of Egypt because the US is paying off Mubarak to isolate Gaza,\nwhat with their democratically elected government not being popular enough\nwith the Israel.\n\nThe US seems to me to be playing a very predictable game, manipulated into\nbeing the big bad guy in the Islamic fundamentalist story. And when a chunk of\nthe US citizenry won't stand for doing nothing in the face of terrorism, the\nbody politic is paralyzed by its fear and can be directed like a herd of\ncattle. I have read supposedly rational people actually say that \"fighting\nthem over there is better than fighting them here\", as if terrorism was some\nkind of thing you beat by killing people. The mind boggles.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.038"
    },
    {
        "id": 1058517,
        "hacker": "barrkel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 320,
        "comment": "And on the other hand, text streams are easy to work with, because ad-hoc\ntools can be written to work with them, rather than having to wrestle with\nstrongly typed libraries and being constrained to languages compatible with\nthe libraries that define those types. Imagine a web written using CORBA RPCs\nover rendering APIs, rather than HTML over HTTP.\n\nYou can argue that HTML has inherent syntax and semantics, but of course\nserver and client can have slightly different ideas, and it all still works,\nmostly. The same is largely true of shell programming using pipes: different\nstages in the pipe expect certain formats, for regular expression or field\nextraction, and format pasting together, etc. The format is easy to eyeball\nand easy to test on the shell REPL, so in practice the problems aren't large.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.222"
    },
    {
        "id": 1992950,
        "hacker": "barrkel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 320,
        "comment": "You're defending your honesty, but your honesty isn't what's being attacked;\nit's your competence.\n\nI've been asked in interviews before, how to reverse a single-linked list, and\nimpressed interviewers with my answer to this seemingly trivial problem; but I\nalso remember when I first met the problem, in a newsgroup posting nearly two\ndecades ago, and I had temporarily convinced myself it couldn't be done in\nconstant space. But then I saw the problem as pushing and popping of stacks:\nview the old list as a stack to be popped, and the new list as a stack to be\npushed, and thence the list shall be reversed.\n\nBut doing it elegantly - in constant space - is besides the point. Reversing a\nlinked list is a problem which can be solved, even clumsily, without much\nthought. But demonstrating problem-solving in an interview situation, that is\nthe point.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.165"
    },
    {
        "id": 2279182,
        "hacker": "barrkel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 320,
        "comment": "They cannot all run current account surpluses with one another; it's a\nmathematical impossibility. Germany's current account surplus with other Euro-\nzone members corresponds exactly to a current account deficit; the sum of the\ntwo is zero in this zero-sum game.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.088"
    },
    {
        "id": 3123552,
        "hacker": "barrkel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 320,
        "comment": "I suspect you missed the point of the article, which was that the telemetry\nmeasured the wrong level of abstraction in users' tasks.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 3214586,
        "hacker": "barrkel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 320,
        "comment": "One of the nicer things about Flash is that it's easy to block en masse, which\ncuts out on so many visually distracting animated things.\n\nOne of my worries with HTML5 is that we won't have a good heuristic for\npreventing animation and video.\n\nAs it is, YouTube occasionally serves me up their HTML5 video player, and it's\na significantly worse experience than the Flash one, for the simple reason\nthat it autoplays, whereas FlashBlock will stop Flash autoplay. I can't tell\nyou how many times I've been listening to a video, wondering why it sounds so\nawful, and then figuring out there's another video autoplaying in a background\ntab.\n\nSo we (or at least I) will need some way of killing / freezing HTML5 canvas,\nvideo etc. elements until the user assents to their animation.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.043"
    },
    {
        "id": 3218080,
        "hacker": "barrkel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 320,
        "comment": "We all have brands; in public, we try to be consistent with an idea we have of\nourselves. Only some of us use that word thusly, but a rose by any other name\nwould smell as sweet.\n\nSo I ask you: is your objection to the use of the word, or to the notion of a\nconsistent self?\n\n(Every act of communication is an attempt to manipulate: to teach, to\nconvince, to humour, etc. Saying that is almost meaningless in this context,\nunless you have specific moral wrongs in mind.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.082"
    },
    {
        "id": 3494801,
        "hacker": "barrkel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 320,
        "comment": "Ireland never industrialized. Went from subsistence tenant farmers to post-\nindustrial, via famine, revolution, civil war, disillusion with church\ninstitutions and attracting foreign direct investment in the middle.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.008"
    },
    {
        "id": 9409004,
        "hacker": "barrkel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 320,
        "comment": "I'm fairly certain capitalism in its current form isn't sustainable (cf\nPiketty), and I don't think government is intrinsically sociopathic.\n\nThe open question is if government with checks and balances is stable in the\nlong term, or if it will fall apart and have one branch take over. Time will\ntell.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.041"
    },
    {
        "id": 10481527,
        "hacker": "barrkel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 320,
        "comment": "If we followed your advice, the differential between worst case and best case\nperformance would be large.\n\nThere are good reasons for preferring a less extreme difference in potential\nperformance for general computing with AOT compiled languages. In particular,\nwe should ensure the worst case performance isn't awful. We wouldn't want e.g.\nan occasional exception getting thrown to act like a DoS attack on a web\nserver.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.097"
    },
    {
        "id": 12385715,
        "hacker": "barrkel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 320,
        "comment": "Nationalism is exactly what lead to centuries of bloodshed in Europe.\nNationalism is the evil: this conceit that people from different nations with\ndifferent rulers are sufficiently different from one another that it's worth\ngoing to war with them.\n\nThe EU has its flaws too, of course. Because of its necessarily top-down\nnature, it tends towards grand aspirational things which it can't quite\nachieve very well because national governments retain too much power, so it\ninterferes in things where national governments care a little less, not always\nwisely. It should have more regionalism and subsidiarity.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.093"
    },
    {
        "id": 16019992,
        "hacker": "barrkel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 320,
        "comment": "Harassment isn't the problem. The formation of groups of like-minded people in\necho chambers is the issue that corrodes democracy.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19523830,
        "hacker": "barrkel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 320,
        "comment": "If security gets in the way of usability, everybody loses. It's always a\ntradeoff, not binary.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 9664729,
        "hacker": "pvaldes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 321,
        "comment": "Gosh, is not so funny when is legal ;-)\n\nhttp://icelandreview.com/news/2015/04/27/killing-basques-now...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.233"
    },
    {
        "id": 15999082,
        "hacker": "pvaldes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 321,
        "comment": "perl -e 'print \"yep, is porn\\n\" if $filename =~ /(Porn|Sex|XXX)/;'\n\nShould spot the 99% of cases.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18307738,
        "hacker": "pvaldes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 321,
        "comment": "silicose -> silicosis\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 21202216,
        "hacker": "pvaldes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 321,
        "comment": "Nature always in the middle of our way. Is so annoying that we can't turn\nAfrica in a huge cow field... (roll eyes).\n\nOn the other way, milk fortified with Antimony white, or even better the sweet\nwhite lead paint, would do surprising things to children health...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.089"
    },
    {
        "id": 10716652,
        "hacker": "pvaldes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 321,
        "comment": "Sorry, but Trump is not the president\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 10591005,
        "hacker": "pvaldes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 321,
        "comment": "Thanks Christina, seems a really interesting field.\n\nI wonder for example what happens with the doses. How do you protect\nyourselves from your biological organisms designed to make complex substances\nin, maybe, I'm just guessing, concentrated doses?. Substances that could lead\nto allergic reactions, like Artemisin does in some cases, for example.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 8280719,
        "hacker": "mythz",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 322,
        "comment": "> the entire source code for the .NET Framework is available.\n\nWhich means nothing as no-one else is legally allowed to use it. It's only\n\"Source Open\" (not \"Open Source\") so no-one is legally allowed to adopt,\nadapt, enhance, etc as can be done with true Open Source projects.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.128"
    },
    {
        "id": 4299047,
        "hacker": "mythz",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 322,
        "comment": "It's the worst company motto of all time!\n\nThey seemingly can't make any pro-company decision without being accused of\nconsorting with the Devil.\n\nIn contrast everyone knows Apple just cares about Apple. Whenever they do\nsomething evil, it just gets labelled as \"Oh, that's just Apple being Apple\".\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-1.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3085230,
        "hacker": "mythz",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 322,
        "comment": "My tribute of Steve Jobs' beautiful world:\nhttp://www.servicestack.net/thankyou_steve.png\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.850"
    },
    {
        "id": 11967748,
        "hacker": "ajuc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 323,
        "comment": "There's already unrest in the world. It all feels like 1930s since a few years\n:/\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.225"
    },
    {
        "id": 9921150,
        "hacker": "ajuc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 323,
        "comment": "> One paper published in 2010 found that absenteeism among German workers\n> would be 15-20% lower if they did not commute. If it were somehow possible\n> to scrap commuting altogether, the British economy would see a productivity\n> boost worth £12 billion a year, according to the Centre for Economics and\n> Business Research, a think-tank.\n\nAllowing occasional working from home has the same effects, and require no\ninvestment in infrastructure.\n\n> But it is not just housing markets that hold back productivity. According to\n> one study, employment in the Bay Area around San Francisco would be about\n> five times larger than it is but for tight regulation on construction of all\n> types.\n\nI'm not familiar with Bay Area, but in Poland people constantly complain about\noverregulation of construction, and we have much less restrictive construction\nlaw than in western Europe (and it shows - public space in Poland is awful\ncompared to Czech Republic or Germany).\n\nYou can have too loose construction law, and the result is a city centre were\nnobody lives - people just commute to work and back. This results in suburbia,\nand longer commute times - the direct opposite of the effect they wanted to\nachieve with the first point in that article.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.048"
    },
    {
        "id": 9684961,
        "hacker": "ajuc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 323,
        "comment": "You feel gratitude when you receive change from the shop clerk and say\n\"thanks, bye\"?\n\nI guess the word \"gratitude\" is routinely badly translated, too, in that case.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 1090793,
        "hacker": "ajuc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 323,
        "comment": "1\\. This assumes that judges (priests) are honest and neutral to the case, and\ndoesn't believe in the intervention of God themselves.\n\n2\\. This assumes people innocent in this case won't be afraid God won't help\nthem because of theirs other sins (and who is not a sinner?).\n\n3\\. I don't think people were that much religious then. I mean - sexually\nmedieval people wasn't more puritanical than we are, why should we assume they\nwere believing in God thah strong (to put hand in the fire etc).\n\n4\\. How do we know ordeals worked? It's obvious that priests were describing\ntheir work in superlatives. And they were the most literate class then.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.136"
    },
    {
        "id": 8707797,
        "hacker": "ajuc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 323,
        "comment": "Thank you.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18065269,
        "hacker": "ajuc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 323,
        "comment": "Induced demand is when more people drive, or they drive more often, or longer\nroutes because of added roads.\n\nThis is when the same amount of traffic is distributed less optimally because\nof adding new edges on the graph.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.194"
    },
    {
        "id": 17400392,
        "hacker": "ajuc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 323,
        "comment": "Pretty much everybody knows that in Poland? The late summer/early autumn is\ncalled \"Babie lato\" (old women's summer) because of thousands of such threads\nflying in the air and catching on trees etc.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.142"
    },
    {
        "id": 12355847,
        "hacker": "acangiano",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 324,
        "comment": "The implementation is actually quite simple. It checks that the function\nlength is more than 4 lines of code AND that you are not Robert Martin. If\nthat's the case, it prints \"Your function is too complex\".\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 5825381,
        "hacker": "acangiano",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 324,
        "comment": "Kickstarter is supposedly limited to US/UK companies and individuals. Are they\nsolely Canadian or do they have a US presence as well?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.071"
    },
    {
        "id": 1353068,
        "hacker": "acangiano",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 324,
        "comment": "$ curl -I www.reddit.com\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9452405,
        "hacker": "danbruc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 325,
        "comment": "Luckily at least some malware authors suck at cryptography, too. Generate a\nrandom symmetric key, encrypt all files with this key, encrypt the symmetric\nkey with an asymmetric public key included in the malware. Game over. At least\nuntil someone manages to obtain the private key.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.136"
    },
    {
        "id": 11670684,
        "hacker": "danbruc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 325,
        "comment": "Here is a Numberphile video [1] that explains - at the very end - why this\ndatabase was put together.\n\n[1] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTveQ1ndH1c\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 17160745,
        "hacker": "danbruc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 325,
        "comment": " _Even if there is something that could influence our choice but that is not\nthe state of the universe and that is not randomness, it would still be\nsomething, not yourself, pulling your strings, would it not?_\n\nIt could be, for example if it was a god that influenced your choices and\nassuming we would neither consider this god part of the universe nor part of\nyou. But that is also not necessarily the case, for example if your choices\nwould be influenced by your soul assuming we would not consider souls part of\nthe universe but still part of you.\n\nBut it is also not obvious that this is possible in a meaningful way. Whether\nsouls or gods, they must at least be able to affect you and your choices,\notherwise they may also not exist at all, at least if we are only thinking\nabout your lifetime in this universe, they could still of have consequences in\na life after death or whatever. One could also argue that you, meaning the\npart of you within the universe, must be able to influence your soul because\nin which sense would it be your soul if it were unaffected by everything you\nexperience and do? And similarly we usually think of a god as being influenced\nby us by observing what is going on in the universe.\n\nSo we have at least a one-way interaction between us and the universe in\ngeneral and souls or gods. And for many interesting things we want to get out\nof souls or gods we would even need two-way interactions. Which raises the\nquestion why we would not consider them parts of the universe? And this is the\ncase for all supernatural things, why would we not consider them part of the\nuniverse, after all they must at least be able to influence us at least by\nbeing observable. We could exclude them, for example ghosts, because we have\nno understanding of how they work, but that is a rather weak criterion not\nunlike yet undiscovered physics.\n\nOr we could try to exclude them because the usual laws of nature do not apply\nto them [1]. But in order to be able to move the curtains in the bed room or\nto tilt all the picture frames in the living room, a ghost must at least be\nable to interact with the stuff in our universe, otherwise it would remain\nunobservable, and therefore supernatural things can not be totally\ndisconnected from the normal universe and how it works. So it is not obvious\nto me that you even can separate things into a normal universe and another\nrealm of souls, gods, or ghosts that is however still interacting with the\nnormal universe without this distinction being rather arbitrary. Especially if\nyou think of the universe as all the things that can potentially interact with\neach other, possibly only in a one-way fashion [2], than the universe is\nclosed under this and everything outside the universe can not possibly affect\nanything in the universe by definition.\n\nTo return to the original topic, it may or may not be you that pulls the\nstrings if your choices are influenced by something outside of the universe,\nbut I think the hard part is actually finding something outside the universe\nthat could have an influence on your choices and that is outside of the\nuniverse in a meaningful way and not just due to an arbitrary definition like\nwell understood things are in the universe and things we do not yet understand\nare outside of it.\n\n[1] Just as in the case of the universe with its laws of nature and free will\none can ask what kind of rules can, could, or have to apply to souls and gods.\nWhat can affect their decisions, what can be affected by their decisions? Is a\ngod or soul subject to any laws of nature or at least logic or whatever? And\nif not, what determines its behavior, it probably should not be randomness.\nNote that this are very similar questions as compared to free will, just as if\nwe only pushed the hard parts of the question out of the universe but that of\ncourse does not answer them. Even if we conclude that our choices are\ninfluenced by our soul, that just means we now have to figure out how the soul\nworks and makes decisions leaving us essentially with the same questions as\nbefore.\n\n[2] Radioactive decay is an example, the decay certainly affects the universe\nbut you can not do anything to affect the decay of a nucleus. At least in the\nclassical picture of radioactivity, the quantum Zeno effect actually allows\ninfluencing decay rates.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.044"
    },
    {
        "id": 7329320,
        "hacker": "danbruc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 325,
        "comment": "I am not talking about the status quo - the status quo of this world is simply\nfucked up. Less fucked up than in the past but still fucked up. So for me and\nespecially for this discussion it is completely irrelevant who is doing what\nright now, I am interested in how it should be.\n\nAnd I see neither how something we decide in Germany may affect the UK to a\ndegree that justifies espionage, nor do I see how decision of the UK may\nimpact Germany to such a degree. Can you think of a good example?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.135"
    },
    {
        "id": 17382557,
        "hacker": "phyzome",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 326,
        "comment": "On the one hand, it's abysmally unprofessional, and can give you a bad\nreputation.\n\nOn the other hand... at least both sides are being equally unprofessional now?\n-.-\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.281"
    },
    {
        "id": 12669108,
        "hacker": "phyzome",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 326,
        "comment": "Ah, I missed that! Thanks for the correction.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 19956966,
        "hacker": "phyzome",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 326,
        "comment": "It took me a long time to understand why Maven uses version strings like\n4.2.1-SNAPSHOT but this is exactly why it's useful.\n\n(The standard practice is to strip the \"-SNAPSHOT\" off for the release commit,\nthen stick it back on for the next commit, but with a bumped minor version.\nBoth commits are then pushed at once, so stuff built locally always is marked\nas a SNAPSHOT.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.061"
    },
    {
        "id": 20003698,
        "hacker": "pault",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 327,
        "comment": "Are you saying that the quest has stupid games with terrible graphics? The\nones I've played are only slightly scaled down from the rift games I've\nplayed. Beat saber, space pirate trainer, super hot, etc are all on the quest\nand are just as amazing as ever. I don't think VR is the right format for\nhardcore PC gaming, if that's your complaint. The platform really shines with\nsimple games with clever emergent gameplay.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.045"
    },
    {
        "id": 15472344,
        "hacker": "pault",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 327,
        "comment": "> political corruption only arises when someone breaks the illusion of the\n> State being some kind of entity that seeks the well-being of every citizen.\n\nCorruption is when the state fails to enforce rule of law, which is its\npurpose.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 20002302,
        "hacker": "pault",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 327,
        "comment": "Is there any reason why you couldn't mirror your repo on github for the\ndonations platform?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7197000,
        "hacker": "Nux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 328,
        "comment": "I hope Tesla won't bundle crapware you can't uninstall.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7667608,
        "hacker": "Nux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 328,
        "comment": "I can confirm that this add-on brings back the \"status bar\" and WorldIP\nextension works with it nicely.\n\nhttps://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/the-addon-bar...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 14855270,
        "hacker": "Nux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 328,
        "comment": "Too bad it doesn't do youtube.\n\nAnyone knows of a cli app that can play local files as well as youtube?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.350"
    },
    {
        "id": 7697103,
        "hacker": "Nux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 328,
        "comment": "Well deserved, Linus is a revolutionary (along with the people that backed him\nup).\n\nLinux and git have radically changed the face of technology.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 5662442,
        "hacker": "Nux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 328,
        "comment": "BTW HN has been unusually slow these past days, got frequent nginx errors,\ntoo.\n\nTurned off SPDY in browser for the moment, let's see if I get any more nginx\nerrors.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.012"
    },
    {
        "id": 5755972,
        "hacker": "Nux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 328,
        "comment": "He's a humanist!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9393014,
        "hacker": "jakobegger",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 329,
        "comment": "There's a pretty neat vector graphics app for Linux called Inkscape. I used it\nfor some time when I worked on Linux and got used to it. Of course, I was\nhappy when I could go back to Adobe Illustrator, but for a free app Inkscape\nis pretty great (and it's the only usable graphics app on Linux)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.357"
    },
    {
        "id": 21144292,
        "hacker": "jakobegger",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 329,
        "comment": "You forgot to mention medical tourism for organ transplants taken from young,\nhealthy people that happen to follow the wrong ideology.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 12260742,
        "hacker": "jakobegger",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 329,
        "comment": "Because they sell you the game?\n\nIf you go to a store, buy a lamp, and it doesn't work, can they just say \"our\nsupplier said it works\"?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 14401994,
        "hacker": "upofadown",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 330,
        "comment": "Meh, we could use hydrogen if we really wanted to. If you separate the lift\nfrom the people/propulsion there is little chance of a strongly rising gas\nleak causing a fire. Heck, you can even do electronics in an explosive\nhydrogen atmosphere (I've personally done it). It just takes a lot of care and\nas a result is expensive to design.\n\nWhat you can't do is have random people inside the outer envelope that also\ncontains the gas bags. Anything that is going to be light enough to fly is\ngoing to leak a lot of hydrogen.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.072"
    },
    {
        "id": 20029291,
        "hacker": "upofadown",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 330,
        "comment": "From here:\n\n* https://chrony.tuxfamily.org/comparison.html\n\n\"Size of stripped daemon binary in default configuration on Linux x86-64\"\n\n    \n    \n        chrony:   210 KB\n        openntpd: 87 KB\n    \n\nI admit to feeling a little amusement at the complete horror expressed by\ntimekeeping geeks when they discover how openntpd handles leap seconds. It\ndoesn't and the developers don't care. The time just slews to the new time at\nno particular rate. Openntpd ends up being a political protest against the\ninsanity of leap seconds...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.007"
    },
    {
        "id": 17001484,
        "hacker": "upofadown",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 330,
        "comment": "I guess if you are going to go bad, hacking a lottery is not the most terrible\nthing you can do. Reducing public confidence in what is basically the numbers\nracket might even be considered a public good...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 9645906,
        "hacker": "celticninja",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 331,
        "comment": "try out cryptostorm.is i have ad zero issues with them and have been running\nit for the last few months (>3 <6)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 11026234,
        "hacker": "celticninja",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 331,
        "comment": "or you could install Vysor. This lets you control your phone from a computer.\nInterestingly using google play's install to device feature you can add it\nafter you break your screen, although I am not sure if it is possible to set\nit up and activate it from your computer, it seems like an easier and faster\nsolution to this problem.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.083"
    },
    {
        "id": 11084340,
        "hacker": "celticninja",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 331,
        "comment": "That sounds like a tractor beam to me.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9021893,
        "hacker": "drzaiusapelord",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 332,
        "comment": ">M4s at low ready pointed at us.\n\nI'm not following. If you're a soldier that's how you hold your weapon when\nits out:\n\nhttp://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/us-soldier-17920177.jpg\n\nThe low level guys guarding planes probably didn't have the autonomy to put\ntheir weapons away while guarding. This is SOP for a lot of military\nactivities. Your weapon is out and held at the ready. Any other position\ninvites liability as you can't get up to aim quickly enough in a firefight.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.022"
    },
    {
        "id": 2392238,
        "hacker": "drzaiusapelord",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 332,
        "comment": "Is fragmentation really the issue? I think the issue is quality. Every android\nphone I've used was very different from the last. My friends G1 isn't a lot\nlike my Vibrant and my Vibrant isn't a lot like my old EVO. Three different\nGUIs! Heck, Samsung decided to put in their own filesystem on the Vibrant and\nall Vibrant owners suffer from random lag.\n\nEach phone has a different camera app, different gallery, different\neverything. Its annoying. They're all more or less phoned in - if you pardon\nthe pun.\n\nWhat google really needs to do is address its ugly stock GUI and put some\nshiny on there. Put in a decent media player. Put in lots of Apple-quality\napps so that OEMs don't feel the need to completely redo everything because\nthe stock android looks like something a defense contractor would make.\n\nMaybe they can even make custom GUI enhancements run in userspace so that\nupdates don't require redoing them. There should be a skinnable layer on top\nof system widgets. Heck, once you have that then google can start pushing out\nits own updates to phones and OEMs won't need to wait 8 months to port them\nover.\n\nOne can dream, I guess. Or I can buy an iphone again or move to Win7. My\nlittle Android experiment isn't really going anywhere. Its just as locked down\nas an iphone in practice and I suffer with Samsung's or HTC's low quality\nenhancements.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.049"
    },
    {
        "id": 5171687,
        "hacker": "drzaiusapelord",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 332,
        "comment": ">it was ultimately Flash's poor reputation among techies that brought it down.\n\nSorry, but techie's opinions are overrated. iOS and mobile video brought Flash\ndown a few notches, not us.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.235"
    },
    {
        "id": 15491617,
        "hacker": "drzaiusapelord",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 332,
        "comment": "Well, that's the big issue isn't it? Pre-twitter, pre-out of control social\nmedia, etc a claim from a Jr level person like this would have been met with\nskepticism and gone through an academic filter that would has squashed it.\nNowadays its all over the world before there's a sane response to it. Sadly,\nmany who have memorized this little factoid will never see the rebuttal.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.069"
    },
    {
        "id": 9772874,
        "hacker": "drzaiusapelord",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 332,
        "comment": "Bloomberg didn't coin \"sharing economy.\" This is bay area/valley liberalism\nand \"share\" services dominate in more left-leaning urban areas. There seems to\nbe a big appeal of the \"Oh, I'm not renting my home out for the money, I'm\ndoing it to help poor travelers, meet new people, fight the 'evil' hotel\nindustry, etc\" ethos, which is pretty much bullshit.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.039"
    },
    {
        "id": 8467002,
        "hacker": "drzaiusapelord",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 332,
        "comment": "Wow, that's quite the downgrade. What's the logic here? To save energy to keep\nit fanless? Or is this cost-cutting?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 5325667,
        "hacker": "pwnna",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 333,
        "comment": "I find that firebug slows down the browser after a while of debugging. Memory\nleak? Make it faster :)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.172"
    },
    {
        "id": 6917780,
        "hacker": "pwnna",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 333,
        "comment": "Because these laws are made a very long time ago and it takes time for them to\ncatch up with reality.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.065"
    },
    {
        "id": 12728783,
        "hacker": "pwnna",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 333,
        "comment": "That article describes how the master encryption key stored on the hdd (your\npassword encrypts this key afaik) gets corrupted, which means the author was\nunable to recover the files on the computer even if nothing is wrong anywhere\nelse.\n\nNow I'm not familiar with the inner workings of OS X as I don't personally use\nthat system. However, with FDE (LUKS) on Linux, this is 100% avoidable if you\nbacked up the LUKS Header: https://calum.org/posts/backup-your-LUKS-header-\nand-LVM-conf....\n\nThis does not negate the need for a real backup tho. So you should backup your\ndata regardless, however you want to do that.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.123"
    },
    {
        "id": 6651506,
        "hacker": "secstate",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 334,
        "comment": "While i agree with the general folly of piping to a shell, have you ever\nactually tried to do a rm -rf / ? Most modern posix systems will catch you,\neven if you sudo it.\n\nAlso, barring that example I can't come up with many other horrible scenario.\nUnfortunate ones, sure. But not catastrophic. And as someone else said, adding\nrandom ppas would allow much worse things, and people do that all the time.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.070"
    },
    {
        "id": 6849820,
        "hacker": "secstate",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 334,
        "comment": "That's all well and good, but the whole point of a scale is that students fall\nsomewhere on it and it reflects work done in comparison to something. If not\nother students, then just patting ourselves on the back for a job well done.\n\nWould you need a some slacker half-following directions to earn an Average?\nNo, you'd need the Average of the students in the course to earn an Average.\nOtherwise the distinction is meaningless.\n\nThen again, I've just spent some time re-reading Covey's Seven Habits of\nHighly Effective people, and I've given up caring too much about grades per-\nse. They discourage cooperation and encourage competition amongst peers. And\nin doing that strongly bias their adherents to win-lose scenarios when we\nshould all strive for win-win scenarios.\n\nIf you think that's bunk, I encourage you to read Covey's book. Coming at it\nwith an open-mind can truly be life-changing in a positive way.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.106"
    },
    {
        "id": 14916640,
        "hacker": "secstate",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 334,
        "comment": "In all fairness, the corrupting influence of big money interests from\nfederalist countries does not help here. One can hardly argue that socialist\nreformers in Central America were the reason those governments failed.\nPolitical assassinations driven by the policies of capitalist nations caused\nthose instabilities.\n\nNot trying to argue that Chavez and now Maduro are not demagogues, but let's\nnot throw the baby out with the bath water here. No one ever said pure\nsocialism worked, just like pure capitalism is a pipe dream. The world catches\nit's breath when moderates of both sides of the spectrum are in power.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.052"
    },
    {
        "id": 18878419,
        "hacker": "potta_coffee",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 335,
        "comment": "Or we could stop arming our proxy armies who are out there killing civilians\non the daily.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19100815,
        "hacker": "potta_coffee",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 335,
        "comment": "I'm sure that some people can't afford to live and take these loans. I've also\npersonally known people who take them because they're terrible at managing\nmoney, and they make impulsive choices.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.091"
    },
    {
        "id": 18555193,
        "hacker": "potta_coffee",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 335,
        "comment": "What would you do if the codebase was actually 5 codebases absorbed from 5\ndifferent smaller companies? Assume that zero institutional knowledge about\nthe code / business have been passed on.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.075"
    },
    {
        "id": 17470128,
        "hacker": "est",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 336,
        "comment": "I think it's the re package's fault. It's badly designed.\n\nre.match should return a match object no matter what, and .group() should\nreturn strings, empty string if non were matched.\n\nWe don't even need anything remotely :=\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 4503526,
        "hacker": "est",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 336,
        "comment": "If you are working on a serious project you are likely to write some db\nspecific code, sqlite3 is only suitable for general ORM-only tasks.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.044"
    },
    {
        "id": 5101839,
        "hacker": "est",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 336,
        "comment": "Thousands of programmers on Weibo submitted their plea to miit.gov.cn website\nfor relieving github. Guess it worked.\n\nI call this new kind of ShangFang, it won't be long till this channel gets\nflooded.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.229"
    },
    {
        "id": 13019676,
        "hacker": "est",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 336,
        "comment": "The exact same thing happens within China many years ago. China is decades\nahead in information flow control.\n\nWebsites like Weibo/QQ/Wechat will display a banner text saying some tweets\n(or microblogging cards as you call it) contains a mis-information.\n\nAny mis-information with more than five hundred retweets will face criminal\nprosecution.\n\nThe result? Authorities fight mis-information with half-baked and premature\nrefutes. In practice refutes can be 100% arbitrary even fake. You can't refute\na refute because they are final, non-debatable and in-reversible. Remember the\nrefute mechanism is to stop the spread of \"mis-information\" so debate refutes\nare dangerous and would cause Streisand effect.\n\nThe best part, the process is 100% manual, so PR firms totally lobbied website\nadmins, officials in power, this corrupted industry is multi-million dollar\nbusiness today.\n\nSo who watches the watchmen? It's a twisted long path ahead.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.008"
    },
    {
        "id": 16817885,
        "hacker": "Izkata",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 337,
        "comment": "The April Fools trailer [0] makes me think you could. It'd be more along the\nlines of a basic Hero's Journey story, but that doesn't necessarily mean it\nwould be bad.\n\n[0] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBCzkz3gHb8\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.128"
    },
    {
        "id": 19340914,
        "hacker": "Izkata",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 337,
        "comment": "I like Stargate SG-1's solution to this: Evidence is all around us (both in\nmythology and ancient artifacts), we just don't recognize it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 17275869,
        "hacker": "Izkata",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 337,
        "comment": "> I’m pretty sure there was never a high growth phase where users were\n> actually interacting with the chatbots.\n\nThere was somewhere around 2003-2005, when a couple good ones started showing\nup on AIM. Since that was the IM of choice at the time, there was zero\nfriction to actually interacting with one.\n\nAnyone predicting it as a \"next big thing\" after around 2007 totally missed\nthe actual hype and was trying to build on something users had already\ndismissed as not actually the future.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.114"
    },
    {
        "id": 1255032,
        "hacker": "cubicle67",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 338,
        "comment": "except you can't add a usb port via a software update\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 1140587,
        "hacker": "cubicle67",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 338,
        "comment": "It's probably just because it's late here, and I'm over tired, but I'm having\na real hard time understanding your complaint. Are you able to provide some\nexamples please?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.188"
    },
    {
        "id": 3435992,
        "hacker": "cubicle67",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 338,
        "comment": "\n    \n    \n        if warrior.feel.empty?\n          warrior.walk! :forward\n        else\n          warrior.attack!\n        end\n    \n\nEdit: if you're new to ruby syntax, then it's probably worth pointing out that\nthe ? and ! on the end of the method names has no special function (they're\nboth valid characters for using in method names). By convention, methods that\nreturn a boolean end in ? and methods that modify the object end in !. For\nexample, Array has two sort methods - sort and sort!. some_array.sort will\nreturn a sorted copy of some_array but leave the original unsorted.\nsome_array.sort!, however, will sort aome_array\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.175"
    },
    {
        "id": 12573608,
        "hacker": "aikah",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 339,
        "comment": "Enough with that bullshit.\n\n> junior devs\n\nmostly don't make architectural decisions. It's a bit easy to keep on blaming\n\"junior devs\". Who keeps on hyping up and marketing useless stuffs ? that's\nnot \"junior devs\", that's big consultancies that want to sell their crappy\nservices, that's PAAS that want to sell more servers, that's vendors that want\nto sell more useless stuff. Enough with blaming \"junior devs\". Junior devs\ndon't lead teams and have very little say when it comes to architectural\nchoices, they don't contract this or that consultancy, they don't decide\nwhether a business will run on Amazon or Azure. Junior devs didn't invent\nNoSQL, Microservices, \"Serveless\" and all that bullshit. Well established\nplayers sell these services to others, and the people who drink the kool-aid\nare managers, not junior devs.\n\nDo you really think \"junior devs\" want to maintain 50 micro servers just\nbecause it's trendy? when they could get away with a single one?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.109"
    },
    {
        "id": 9320204,
        "hacker": "aikah",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 339,
        "comment": "Now if only someone could write \"Let's build a database\"...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11374987,
        "hacker": "aikah",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 339,
        "comment": "Not sure I understand the point of this article, especially in the context of\nC++ where encapsulation with classes helps avoiding things like memory leaks,\ndangling pointers and co. If you feel you need to code C style, use C, with\nall the problem it might incur.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 17853606,
        "hacker": "aikah",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 339,
        "comment": "All Hackintoshs violate MacOS license. You cannot run MacOS on anything else\nthan a Mac or it's just pirating the software.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14325727,
        "hacker": "losteric",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 340,
        "comment": "What do you mean by \"goals\"?\n\nI've met too many people hopelessly throwing themselves against a wall trying\nto \"achieve their dreams\"... they see themselves as a Hollywood-esque main\ncharacter, either aiming unrealistically high or shooting for mundane gimmes.\nWithout a broader vision, those that pick reasonably scoped goals may still\nend up depressed by their small wins that add up to nothing. Modern mss media\nand image culture certainly hasn't helped manage realistic expectations or\nself-perception.\n\nI think it's more important to have a strong life stance - a broader\n_collective_ vision that adds context to the individual - and a stoic\nunderstanding of limitations. That metaheuristic provides deeper meaning while\nfacilitating rational evaluation of our achievements/goals.\n\nDrawing an analogy to software projects, the life stance defines a person's\nmission and tenets while goals act as milestones or stories. Executing without\nthe broader vision simply doesn't work for humans... our limited and unknown\nbudget of time is constantly burning away.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.123"
    },
    {
        "id": 16778281,
        "hacker": "losteric",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 340,
        "comment": "Relevancy is a problem that firmly falls under Google's responsibility... and\nbusinesses must be punished for discriminating over incomplete background\nchecks.\n\nHowever, I don't think the false conviction should be hidden - what if they\nwere guilty and there's a crimes down the road? That information could be\nuseful for the public.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.160"
    },
    {
        "id": 15276731,
        "hacker": "losteric",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 340,
        "comment": "> Does the economy of scale factor in here?\n\nYes. Current pricing is based on the number of people paying for the provided\nservice. The marginal cost per subscriber is negligible so it's fair to assume\nthe price would go down if those services could attract more subscribers. It's\nalso fair to assume subscriptions would increase if customers got access to\nmore publications for the same price.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.321"
    },
    {
        "id": 16154724,
        "hacker": "losteric",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 340,
        "comment": "That's not a stable situation. The EU forced Microsoft / IE to unbundle -\nGoogle's day of reckoning approaches.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 19946729,
        "hacker": "eeZah7Ux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 341,
        "comment": "20-40ms with what language and implementation?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12959310,
        "hacker": "eeZah7Ux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 341,
        "comment": "> The people who write these articles just can't accept the idea that people\n> didn't vote for Trump unless they were tricked into it, or were fed lies.\n\nThis looks like a middle ground fallacy.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 17516107,
        "hacker": "eeZah7Ux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 341,
        "comment": "No.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18156542,
        "hacker": "eeZah7Ux",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 341,
        "comment": "In US car companies literally dictated road laws, pushed for car adoption,\nkilled the train system, even made it illegal to jaywalk (it's not illegal in\nmany other countries).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.015"
    },
    {
        "id": 8332044,
        "hacker": "Terretta",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 342,
        "comment": "iCab Mobile for iOS used to support ad filtering, e.g., http://www.icab-\nmobile.de/iCabMobileFilters.html?lang=en but not sure if v8 still does that.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 1358706,
        "hacker": "Terretta",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 342,
        "comment": "Did you ever make someone a mix tape off the radio?\n\nAnd why were record labels so anxious to stream for free over the airwaves\nthey got themselves in trouble?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.017"
    },
    {
        "id": 17460242,
        "hacker": "Terretta",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 342,
        "comment": "My guess — the kind of thought you need to “grok” that system (slow deep\nunderstanding) is unavailable to you when dealing with the kind of thought\ncaused by your situational stressors (fight or flight survival).\n\nDoesn’t mean you’re unable to learn new things. It means your cave-man brain\ndoesn’t think learning system docs is as important as slaying predators and\nfortifying your cave.\n\nIronic, since the way out of the stressors is doing the one thing your brain\ndoesn’t think will help. You have to get your subconscious to believe that.\nTell it to yourself constantly, Thoreau prayer and ‘this too shall pass’\nstyle, ‘meditate’ on the idea that you have a clear path to no stress because\nyou have a developer’s mind, and by using that developer’s mind, you will slay\nthe predators, fortify the cave, and protect your family.\n\nGive yourself the permission to let the urgent stress go, so your subconscious\ncan work on the important thoughts.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.095"
    },
    {
        "id": 3067270,
        "hacker": "Terretta",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 342,
        "comment": "Why is this (very slow to load) tall vertical scroll better than a tab group?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.055"
    },
    {
        "id": 3641222,
        "hacker": "Terretta",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 342,
        "comment": "On a desktop or a device, you can play the music \"from the cloud\" without the\nwhole song being on your computer. That's streaming enough.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 19340672,
        "hacker": "astura",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 343,
        "comment": "When we moralize about how \"expensive car = bad\" (no matter the context) we\ntake the \"personal\" out of \"personal finance.\"\n\nSome people are gearheads, just because you aren't doesn't mean you should\nmoralize the preference of others.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.302"
    },
    {
        "id": 16845044,
        "hacker": "astura",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 343,
        "comment": "No it's really not, over 90% of Americans will claim the standard deduction\nthis year: https://www.forbes.com/sites/ryanellis/2017/11/22/nine-in-te...\n\nMy deductions were usually only around ~$17,000 with pretty decent charitable\ncontributions, I don't even have to think about if I'm going to itemized this\nyear. I suspect I'm a pretty \"average\" itemizer.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.127"
    },
    {
        "id": 16947850,
        "hacker": "astura",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 343,
        "comment": "I use different workspaces for different projects because of differences\nbetween code formatting. One project uses 3 spaces and the other uses four\nspaces. One has curly braces on the same line and the other on their own line.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.058"
    },
    {
        "id": 17079300,
        "hacker": "astura",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 343,
        "comment": "\"Doing their job\" \\- they are data aggregators and brokers, if the data\ndoesn't exist because it was never reported to a third party, there's nothing\nthey can do.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 17202135,
        "hacker": "astura",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 343,
        "comment": "Block quotes are unreadable on mobile, so here's the unformatted text:\n\nHabalov reported the bug to Google and Mozilla engineers, who fixed the issue\nin Chrome 63 and Firefox 60.\n\n\"The bug was addressed by vectorizing the blend mode computations,\" Habalov\nsaid. Safari's implementation of CSS3 mix-blend-mode was not affected as the\nblend mode operations were already vectorized.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 13028585,
        "hacker": "groovy2shoes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 344,
        "comment": "Well, then open source is well above average, seeing as _90%_ of _everything_\nis crap.[0]\n\n[0]: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sturgeon%27s_law\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 7869475,
        "hacker": "groovy2shoes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 344,
        "comment": "Subtype polymorphism. Dynamic dispatch.\n\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subtype_polymorphism\n\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_dispatch\n\nPolymorphism is a feature of the type system, and thus inherently static.\nDynamic dispatch is something you often wind up with as a consequence of\nsubtyping, but neither requires the other, strictly speaking.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.094"
    },
    {
        "id": 12402199,
        "hacker": "groovy2shoes",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 344,
        "comment": "I _still_ think the Motif GUI is _OK_. It's ugly by modern standards, but it's\nfunctional, fast, and works wayyyy faster over the network than anything GTK-\nor Qt-based. Any toolkit that renders with X primitives tends to actually be\nfunctional over the network; anything that renders with pixmaps not so much.\nThat pretty much leaves Athena, Motif, Tk, and a handful of custom GUIs like\nthe one you find in xv. They're mostly all ugly, but there's really no reason\nan Xlib/XCB/Xt-based GUI _must_ be ugly -- it's just that at some point\neveryone decided to start rendering via pixmaps so the ones that don't are all\nold at this point. Personally, I'll deal with the ugliness if it means I have\na responsive UI! Bonus points for small binary, small memory footprint, and\nstable API.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.054"
    },
    {
        "id": 20229330,
        "hacker": "lern_too_spel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 345,
        "comment": "This valuation depends on the continued incompetence of Google and Microsoft,\nwho both offer Slack competitors as part of their productivity packages that\nmost of Slack's paying customers already subscribe to. Their offerings are so\nbad that people pay money to Slack _not_ to use them.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 8945855,
        "hacker": "lern_too_spel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 345,
        "comment": "Even Italy and Spain, having anticipated Pope Francis's sentiment three\ndecades in advance, have lower fertility rates than Japan.\n\nTwo solutions to your demographics problem are to reduce the cost of elder\ncare (http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2013/05/automation-el...) or to\nraise the retirement age (http://business.asiaone.com/news/raise-retirement-\nage-70-lim...).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 16228917,
        "hacker": "lern_too_spel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 345,
        "comment": "The issue that you're raising does not apply for randomized treatment.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18632831,
        "hacker": "lern_too_spel",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 345,
        "comment": "> Google is free to do this for my website too, but they don't.\n\nAs my GGGGGP post said, that is the entire point of AMP. It can be validated\nsafe to preload, which is not possible for HTML pages in general. So no,\nGoogle, Bing, Pinterest, Baidu, LinkedIn, and other sites that preload AMP\npages are not free to do this for your website unless it is written in AMP.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.089"
    },
    {
        "id": 16586612,
        "hacker": "Karunamon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 346,
        "comment": "[disregard this, not enough caffiene today apparently]\n\nSeparation of powers. The SEC is part of the executive branch. The judicial\nbranch is responsible for bringing suit.\n\nIf you want the why for that why, that's a philosophical discussion that\nprobably won't be well served by a HN comment thread.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.030"
    },
    {
        "id": 13458150,
        "hacker": "Karunamon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 346,
        "comment": "HTTPS is for the user's benefit, not the site owner's (barring legislation, of\ncourse). Also, HTTPS prevents hijacking, not just sniffing, of content by a\nMITM. That includes malware injection.\n\nThis has been coming for quite a long time. The time for excuses is over. If\nyou think the safety of your users is \"simply not worth it\", well, I'd like to\nknow what your websites are so I can block them at my firewall. I'm not saying\nthis to be a dick, I'm saying this because this is an attitude of callous\ndisregard on display, and it's downright odious given the modern security\nclimate.\n\nLE is not that hard to use, and I seriously question whether you can't make an\nAPI call once every 90 days per subdomain. The requirements have never been\nlower.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 8720872,
        "hacker": "Karunamon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 346,
        "comment": "Seriously, what the fuck it is with these assholes trying to pass laws that\nwere struck down elsewhere? It happened with video game violence laws, it\nhappened with marriage equality, and it's happening with this now.\n\nIt really should be a fineable/jailable/fireable offense to propose and pass\nlegislation that is _illegal on its face_.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.265"
    },
    {
        "id": 5611224,
        "hacker": "Karunamon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 346,
        "comment": "Mm, I agree with this just on principle, but the problem is that not every law\nthat needs to be passed will be popular.\n\n(The problem with having representatives just being direct, non-autonomous\nproxies of their constituents is that people will vote for things that benefit\nthem and then not vote to pay for it..)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.350"
    },
    {
        "id": 8425615,
        "hacker": "EpicEng",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 347,
        "comment": "Agreed. I hated the \"expired link\" issue. It constantly sent me back to the\nfront page. I would much rather see a newer version of page 2 than to be\nforced back to the beginning (after a backspace and a refresh).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 8164686,
        "hacker": "EpicEng",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 347,
        "comment": "Wow, same with my Mom, who is a lawyer.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 19291686,
        "hacker": "EpicEng",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 347,
        "comment": "Note the use of the comma operator in the C++ version. C# has no equivalent,\nhence the introduction of 'temp'. The first part is just adding to o.x, the\nbit after the comma is the result of the expression, which is what is passed\nto min. The += part would not evaluate to a value. It's ugly.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.225"
    },
    {
        "id": 21349860,
        "hacker": "EpicEng",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 347,
        "comment": "Wow, that was interesting. I'm shocked they make this sort of thing public.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 21521352,
        "hacker": "EpicEng",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 347,
        "comment": "I think it's more that they are DRM obsessed and don't give two flying ducks\nabout Linux. If Linux were important, their DRM would work on it. For one I\nblame them, for the other I don't.\n\nI have to admit I just don't care that much anymore. In the spectrum of things\nI have the time and energy to really care about, DRM has fallen off the list.\nI want to watch The Mandalorian, and damn; it was pretty great.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.216"
    },
    {
        "id": 8974051,
        "hacker": "EpicEng",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 347,
        "comment": "Why are you assuming that this is in fact a new discovery? We don't know what\nthe hell it is because the inventor won't tell us. Until someone can attempt\nto replicate the results it should be viewed as a scan.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.136"
    },
    {
        "id": 14315300,
        "hacker": "libeclipse",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 348,
        "comment": "Is there something like this available commercially, or at least a guide on\nmaking one with a Pi?\n\nI suppose reading the paper is one option.\n\nEDIT: Link to the paper seems to be broken. Here's the PDF:\nhttp://www.cs.vu.nl/~ast/Publications/Papers/lisa-2006.pdf\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 15425257,
        "hacker": "libeclipse",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 348,
        "comment": "Just waiting for the rust/lisp squad to come along and tell us that we\nwouldn't need all this if we just joined them.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12725842,
        "hacker": "libeclipse",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 348,
        "comment": "The UK green party has some very good policies overall, but one pitfall is\nthat they're heavily against nuclear fission.\n\nI was given the chance last year to question one of their MPs about their\nstance on nuclear fusion and the general gist of the response was that they\ndidn't think that it would succeed but they're \"not against research in the\nfield\".\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.093"
    },
    {
        "id": 15705593,
        "hacker": "arghwhat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 349,
        "comment": "> You seem to have found a few minor bugs, and that's cool\n\nI'm sorry, how are total miscompilations and memory corruptions \"minor bugs\"?\n\nI am arguing against the mentality of dismissing compiler bugs, with the idea\nthat \" _you_ will never hit one\". Hence my examples of when I hit them during\nsomething as high-level as web development. I am _not_ arguing that you'll hit\nsuch bug every day, or even every month.\n\nI only have myself and those around me as reference. I have been a software\ndeveloper for less than 10 years, but with the current total, I have been\nhitting a few \"lower layer\" (vm, stdlib, compiler, kernel, hardware) bugs a\nyear.\n\nMaybe I'm just \"unlucky\". If you want to find real numbers, take a look at\nGCC/LLVM/libstdc++/glibc/linux bug tracker statistics. I'm sure you will be\nsurprised.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.001"
    },
    {
        "id": 21571789,
        "hacker": "arghwhat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 349,
        "comment": "Different learning techniques have different applications. I do not believe\nthose techniques are applicable to the hypothetical use-cases of this dataset.\n\nPerhaps semi-supervised could be utilized, which reduces the required\nannotation by some factor _k_ , but still leaves it as a function of the\ndataset.\n\nSelf-supervised basically replaces human annotation with machine annotation,\nmaking it only applicable to a small subset of tasks in which this is possible\n(e.g. you could train \"guess time from picture\" using EXIF timestamp).\n\nUnsupervised is only applicable to very specific tasks.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.031"
    },
    {
        "id": 17204490,
        "hacker": "arghwhat",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 349,
        "comment": "PCIe 3.0 does not have a very high transaction cost. The encoding overhead is\njust 1.5%, and the protocol is quite simple for the primary communication\n(there's a bunch of \"extras\" like retransmits and stuff, but that's not\nimportant here).\n\nI can say that the PCIe x16 cards we develop at work have no problem reaching\nthe theoretical maximum, transmitting around 15GB/s worth of payload data\n(e.g. our 2x100Gb/s NIC with one port pushing 100Gb/s in both directions, and\nanother a few tens of Gb/s in both directions). We don't make cards smaller\nthan x8, so I can't give _measured_ numbers there, but Intel should have no\nproblem transmitting ~4GB/s on that x4.\n\nNVMe surely has an overhead, but this overhead is far from interesting, unless\nyou are implying that the overhead eats a whopping 35% of the available\nbandwidth. Likewise, if Intel had hit a PCIe/NVMe bottle-neck, going to up x8\nwould not not have been difficult in any way (x16 is more annoying, though).\n\nThe performance has either been restricted by the flash itself, or by the\ncontroller—not by the interface. The numbers are also small enough that the\nsoftware side shouldn't be a problem yet. Attaching to the memory bus\nminimizes penalties that are unlikely to be a bottle-neck.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 5926749,
        "hacker": "joelrunyon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 350,
        "comment": "You could have just left this at 'american media'\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6571813,
        "hacker": "joelrunyon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 350,
        "comment": "> They originally optimized for what most Googlers like (who are generally the\n> 1%) and have since learned that you can't run a business just pleasing the\n> elite and whiny ones.\n\nWell you can - you just can't offer the service for free.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.331"
    },
    {
        "id": 3989295,
        "hacker": "joelrunyon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 350,
        "comment": "Why are you so intent on something bad happening to him? In the large scale of\nthings - he got screwed when it came to Facebook.\n\nSure you might not like the guy, but when you're hoping bad things happen to\nhim just because he's about to make a lot of money makes it look like you're\nawfully jealous of the guy.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.337"
    },
    {
        "id": 19589245,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "Extensive discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19587478\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11242690,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=11239674\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11816200,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=11814512\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11816240,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=11814512\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12669830,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "Extensive discussion of an earlier article:\n\nhttps://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=12661187\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13379831,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "Recent submissions:\n\nhttps://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=12235789\n\nhttps://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=12251162\n\nPlus a few others.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 5014608,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "Results may be correlated with effort if you consider a single person.\nHowever, in real life, you're usually competing with someone else.\n\nLet's say we're comparing two employees: X works hard 80 hours a week; Y works\nonly 40 hours a week and takes long lunches. But somehow, Y still ends up\nproducing more results of a better quality. A rational manager should pay Y\nmore than X, since it's only the end results that are of value to the company.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.104"
    },
    {
        "id": 5624296,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": " _But there was more. Much more. As soon as the Op-Ed article appeared,\nunhappy Wikipedia editors pounced on my Wikipedia page and started making\nalterations to it, erasing as much as they possibly could without (I assume)\ntechnically breaking the rules. They removed the links to outside sources,\nlike interviews of me and reviews of my novels. Not surprisingly, they also\nremoved the link to the Op-Ed article. At the same time, they put up a banner\nat the top of my page saying the page needed “additional citations for\nverifications.” Too bad they’d just taken out the useful sources._\n\nChildish behavior like this is much more damaging to Wikipedia's reputation\nthan any critical article in the media. And as long as the editors of\nWikipedia act this way, Wikipedia will never get a single cent from me, no\nmatter how many banner ads they slap over the top of the page pleading for\ndonations.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.080"
    },
    {
        "id": 6742990,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "Also, having to hire a lawyer to defend themselves against criminal fraud\ncharges will cost them a lot more than $3500.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 8679569,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "This is the same story that was on the front page a couple of days ago:\n\nhttps://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8670544\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 8848088,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "This is just a shallow summary of Marco Arment's original article, which was\non the front page yesterday:\n\nhttps://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8836734\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.021"
    },
    {
        "id": 9828023,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "Dup of https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=9826131\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9888740,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "Last post was only 6 months ago: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8861118\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10089785,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "Previously: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=10043792\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 10263411,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "Previous discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=10260311\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 10375361,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "Previously: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=10372465\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 16605620,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "> _\" It takes me way too long to absorb information, and requires reading the\n> same topic from multiple sources before things click.\"_\n\nThat's usually how it is with new or difficult concepts. There are things I\nunderstand really well today that I had to read about many times before I\nunderstood them, like recursion.\n\nReading multiple sources about the same topic is a good thing. It means you\ncare enough to really want to understand it. Not all sources are equally good\nat explaining things, and different people understand different explanations\nmore readily.\n\nWith programming related stuff, playing around with code and trying out\ndifferent things to see how they work can also be helpful.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.117"
    },
    {
        "id": 17113405,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=17108376\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19188656,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "Even if Amazon paid no corporate income tax at all, their 25,000 employees\nwould still be paying many millions of dollars a year in state and local\nincome taxes, real estate taxes and sales taxes. And both Amazon and its\nemployees would be buying lots of goods and services from local businesses,\ngenerating even more taxable economic activity.\n\nSome of these employees might even eventually leave Amazon and found new\nstartups in NYC.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.192"
    },
    {
        "id": 13516535,
        "hacker": "greenyoda",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 351,
        "comment": "https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=13510054\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 8257058,
        "hacker": "troels",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 352,
        "comment": " _After one month of insanity and abuse I was called to a Friday afternoon\nmeeting with the founders. They told me that they felt that we had a\ndifference in style and that they didn 't want me to work there anymore. Just\nlike that, no further explanation._\n\nA bit curd perhaps, but following the rest of the story I suppose it makes\nsense? This sounds very much like a culture misfit to me.\n\n(To be clear: I am not passing any judgement on the handling of the matter\nhere. Or on who to blame on the misfitting)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.090"
    },
    {
        "id": 2000341,
        "hacker": "troels",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 352,
        "comment": "I weren't proposing any form of value with my statement. Just pointing out\nthat on the scale of {run-time..compile-time} object model, Ruby is closer to\nthe run time end.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 1507459,
        "hacker": "troels",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 352,
        "comment": "Is military funded on a per-state basis in US? I would expect that to be a\nfederal matter?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 760510,
        "hacker": "troels",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 352,
        "comment": "> It can be quite unpleasant to debug C programs though.\n\nYes, but if you can do that, you can debug anything. Literally - Most high\nlevel languages are implemented in C, so debugging them eventually means\ndebugging C code.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.003"
    },
    {
        "id": 10701822,
        "hacker": "Bjartr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 353,
        "comment": "Hmm, could you use an ultrasonic piezo to aerosolize the liquid without\nexposing it to high heat and so get the flavor effects minus the damaging\ncompounds?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.030"
    },
    {
        "id": 3848450,
        "hacker": "Bjartr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 353,
        "comment": "It's tough to compete, unless there's a product people are willing to buy\nwhich they simply can't buy from the big guys.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.035"
    },
    {
        "id": 21030811,
        "hacker": "Bjartr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 353,
        "comment": "I don't see an obvious connection between those charts and why wind can't get\nmuch bigger. It just shows that wind is currently producing ~26% of the power\ndemand. Would you mind spelling it out since it is not self-evident to me?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3065470,
        "hacker": "MostAwesomeDude",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 354,
        "comment": "I'm going to defer to exarkun on how Twisted does this:\nhttp://twistedmatrix.com/documents/current/web/howto/web-in-... Note that his\nexample doesn't bother to chew CPU, but you could chew CPU if you like, as\nlong as you do it in a thread, and still best Node.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 5674195,
        "hacker": "MostAwesomeDude",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 354,
        "comment": "Did you consider that one of my commitments might be \"Come into the office on\ntime and spend eight hours at work?\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3080155,
        "hacker": "MostAwesomeDude",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 354,
        "comment": "These are pitfalls and usability concerns. Languages that make you actively\nwork against the nature of the language are not good; programming languages\nshould be making this stuff easy.\n\nOne-based indices stop being a \"minor detail\" as soon as you realize that out-\nof-bounds indexing doesn't fail, but returns nil. Time to re-examine all of\nyour code. Combine this with the natural mathematical awkwardness of one-based\nindices and it can get really frustrating, really fast.\n\nI had to do Lua for some game design stuff a few years ago, and these were the\ntwo things which stuck out at me almost immediately and bothered me during the\nentire ordeal. Maybe I've been spoiled by Python, Perl, Java, C++, C, and\nother languages, but it's deeply frustrating how wrong Lua is about this.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.155"
    },
    {
        "id": 6156399,
        "hacker": "alan_cx",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 355,
        "comment": "Fair enough. Your choice.\n\nCant say I have ever found it hard or time consuming to let email\nautomatically archive. It just does it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.136"
    },
    {
        "id": 6994301,
        "hacker": "alan_cx",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 355,
        "comment": "I reckon a way of getting through this, if you are up to no good (well, I say\nno good, I mean no good in their terms, so like Snowden), is to look a bit\nlike a perv, and have a few iffy pics and vids on the laptop. Maybe a bit of\nperv browsing history and what not. That way, you look shify, they pull you\nin, search, find the pics, reaslise why you look shifty, also realise the pics\nare actually legal, and send you on your way. Humans being human are likely to\nstop searching as soon as they find the smut, and miss what you might be\nreally hiding.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.129"
    },
    {
        "id": 6531101,
        "hacker": "alan_cx",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 355,
        "comment": "So, using it is marketing. Now they have their market, and exposure. So, that\npart of their marketing, using that marketing vehicle is over. So, even more\nit seems to make sense to ditch it and perhaps move on to something else. You\ndont have to keep doing the same thing the same way.\n\nAlso, to that end, it seems to have failed. They want people on their site,\nand Flipboard apparently isn't doing that. All it does is use the content to\nkeep people on their site.\n\nTaking the article at face value, I'd say ditch it and market in a different\nway.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.008"
    },
    {
        "id": 6391281,
        "hacker": "alan_cx",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 355,
        "comment": "I have always said comedians should run the place. So many are incredibly\nbright, keen observers of life and manage to cut through the PR and political\ncrap that needlessly muddies the waters. Russel is one of these.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.020"
    },
    {
        "id": 9758729,
        "hacker": "eli_gottlieb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 356,
        "comment": ">Not to mention, there is no standardized grading system in the US. GPAs are\nnominally out of 4.0, but some schools pump those numbers by tacking .5 onto\nhonors classes and 1.0 onto AP. At other schools its 1.0 and 2.0. Other\nschools don't have APs at all, or don't offer a bump for high-level courses.\nWho is the \"better student?\" The one who has a 4.43 at a school where there\nare no APs and honors is a .5 bump, or the student with a 5.28 at a school\nthat offers 19 APs and gives a 2.0 bump? It's ludicrous.\n\nOr, of course, the student who has a 4.0 at a school that doesn't give bumps\nat all, but took no actual AP classes because that would ruin his/her GPA?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.070"
    },
    {
        "id": 8734471,
        "hacker": "eli_gottlieb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 356,
        "comment": ">People who say failure and hardship are good have never experienced them. It\nteaches you all the wrong things-- be conservative, be suspicious, be jaded,\ndon't dream, assume the worst about people, ...\n\nWow! Can I quote you on that?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.232"
    },
    {
        "id": 8167639,
        "hacker": "eli_gottlieb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 356,
        "comment": "This looks especially stupid to those of us living abroad, where a car-\ncentered, spread-out city might _still_ have twice the population density of\nSan Francisco.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-1.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 8046371,
        "hacker": "eli_gottlieb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 356,
        "comment": "Kindles are great for books I'll read sequentially, in which I'll never need\nto consult a specific section, and in which I'll never have to page back-and-\nforth. So, all fiction and most nonfiction I enjoy having in Kindle format.\nTextbooks and references I want to own in dead-tree format.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.460"
    },
    {
        "id": 7709015,
        "hacker": "eli_gottlieb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 356,
        "comment": ">I'm really sorry about about the death of you're mother. Death however, is\npart of life. People die, and people close to you will continue to die at an\nincreasing rate until it is finally your turn.\n\nThat's a pretty lousy thing to say, considering his mother died of _cancer_\nrather than old age.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.130"
    },
    {
        "id": 3835531,
        "hacker": "eli_gottlieb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 356,
        "comment": "All right then. I might try it out.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.286"
    },
    {
        "id": 18878062,
        "hacker": "eli_gottlieb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 356,
        "comment": ">If you don't go to school, you will not die in a gutter.\n\nMy younger brother wasn't so hot on school. Damned smart (for comparison,\nmultiple people in our family have doctoral degrees ;-)), but not very\nenthusiastic for academic or white-collar matters.\n\nIf we hadn't been helping him through his 20s, he'd be dead in a gutter by\nnow.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.035"
    },
    {
        "id": 14856716,
        "hacker": "eli_gottlieb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 356,
        "comment": "Ok, but what _functional_ knowledge did we gain? Not \"run this neural net, and\nan interesting thing happens\". _How_ are those 300 neurons implementing\ninteresting motor behavior? _What_ behavior are they really implementing?\nWhat's the algorithm, what's its goal?\n\nThe connectome model only addresses the third and lowest levels of Marr's\nanalysis of a cognitive/biological system.\n\n1\\. Computational: What does the system aim to do? What problem does it solve?\n\n2\\. Algorithmic: How does the system solve or approximately solve that\nproblem? How does it accomplish its purpose as a part of the organism?\n\n3\\. Implementation: How are cells and/or organs put together to implement that\nsolution?\n\nYou can have a very accurate picture of (3), and still lack any solid\nknowledge about (2) or (1). You can also sometimes have a clear picture of (2)\nand (3), but overgeneralize and wind up with a near-tautological theory for\n(1) -- that's the accusation being thrown at certain parts of theoretical\nneuroscience today.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.164"
    },
    {
        "id": 11693828,
        "hacker": "eli_gottlieb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 356,
        "comment": "IQ is not a linearly meaningful variable. Once you go over 160, IQ deltas stop\nmeaning much of anything.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.350"
    },
    {
        "id": 21192481,
        "hacker": "eli_gottlieb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 356,
        "comment": "Yes, but there's still a pretty hard distinction between material privileges\nand actual constitutional rights. For instance, we don't criticize racialized\npolice brutality because it's some maldistribution of police attention, but\nbecause it violates rights that are supposed to be inviolate.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.014"
    },
    {
        "id": 2613664,
        "hacker": "jarek",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 357,
        "comment": "And with all these businesses they've been consistently losing money. Personal\nrelationship management is not something that gets cheaper with scale, so size\nof potential market doesn't really help as far as I can see.\n\nI haven't seen any particular mention of amount of businesses retained as\nrepeat customers, either.\n\nFuture products? Maybe they'll sell lucky moose.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.131"
    },
    {
        "id": 2341230,
        "hacker": "jarek",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 357,
        "comment": "That's not going to be useful for identifying that obscure song at the bar, is\nit?\n\nThe original post is pretty unspecific. Did the professor claim that creating\na general system with a large database is impossible? That it's impossible as\na term project? That creating a proof of concept system with 3 GB of music\nfrom your personal collection is impossible? That simply identifying a song\ngiven a part of it and the source file is impossible?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.134"
    },
    {
        "id": 1309800,
        "hacker": "jarek",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 357,
        "comment": "Downvotes noted. The truth, it burns.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11965636,
        "hacker": "zepto",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 358,
        "comment": "Because no sane leader has been produced by the political system.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10973791,
        "hacker": "zepto",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 358,
        "comment": "So your reasoning is simply broken here. The word dangerous is indeed not tied\nto a specific danger, however it is not simply a binary label that is either\ntrue or not true about a specific noun. Dangers do in fact vary in type and in\nrelative degree. That is how the word is used in English. Words draw their\nmeanings from their context as well as their definition.\n\nIt seems you're upset about something I said that you disagree with and are\nusing hostility instead of reason.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.092"
    },
    {
        "id": 21193081,
        "hacker": "zepto",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 358,
        "comment": "If you prefer to take the risk, then you are free to buy an android phone. For\nthose who don’t, they can choose an iPhone. That is the current situation, and\nit is good. Taking that choice away by force is not.\n\nYou are proposing to have the government start mandating software features,\nwhich is absurd given your claim not to want the government controlling your\nphone.\n\nI already answered your question about your MacBook but you chose to ignore\nit. The answer is that they _are_ locking down the MacBook to protect users.\n\nAs for the ‘hire a UI designer’ argument. That has been proven not to work,\nbut again you are pretending not to see this.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.089"
    },
    {
        "id": 10194997,
        "hacker": "MagnumOpus",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 359,
        "comment": "Of course they didn't. That never prevented Steve from claiming they did...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19898641,
        "hacker": "MagnumOpus",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 359,
        "comment": "> temperatures were 9C-14C higher\n\nIn such an environment, mankind might survive, but our current farming set-up\nwon't. It might only kill 7 billion people our of 7.5, no big deal. (When\nlooked at from a few million years in the future.)\n\n> CO2 levels were 1000-2000\n\nIndoor CO2 levels are usually double the outdoor levels. H Humans become\ndumb/sluggish at concentrations over 1500ppm, and nauseous at over 2000. Life\nwill thrive, human life won't.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.006"
    },
    {
        "id": 14290144,
        "hacker": "MagnumOpus",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 359,
        "comment": "> elections in lot of developed countries often decided by thin margins from\n> very predictable geographical locations\n\nActually only in the US and UK. Most other developed countries have evolved\nbeyond the \"first past the post\" system.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.009"
    },
    {
        "id": 10544387,
        "hacker": "LukeShu",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 360,
        "comment": "Thanks for the reply! I've got several responses, that are mostly unrelated to\neachother.\n\n1\\. \"interesting definitions\": As you note, \"OpenBSD chose some 'interesting'\ndefinitions for their privileges\". This was the core of my original thesis:\nbecause of the whole-system approach, they were free to choose \"interesting\"\ndefinitions that closely matched their current-implementation-specific usage\npatterns, making the whole thing more convenient, but less general. That's all\nmy original post was trying to say.\n\n2\\. code size: I see that conceptually these 2 code samples work similarly,\nbut one has 5x more LOC.\n\n3\\. dropping and picking up isn't really dropping: If I drop privileges, but\ncan pick them back up, then if I decide to misbehave, picking them back up is\njust something I do first. Dropping them with the possibility of picking them\nup is security theater, not actual security.\n\n4\\. sandboxing is addressed in other presentations: Earlier presentations\nexplain why having tools to restrict the privileges of programs without source\nmodification is inadequate; a common pattern for programs is that they require\nsome privileges during start up, but then don't need them for the rest of\nexecution; a source-unaware mechanism would have to allow the start-up\nprivileges for the entire execution. Otherwise, it's not too different than\nexisting priv-sep tools.\n\n5\\. pledge() isn't about administrative privileges, it's about code\nvulnerability mitigation. Security tools around administrative boundaries are\nimportant, sure. But that is fundamentally not the problem that pledge() is\ntrying to solve; pledge is /mitigating/ against vulnerabilities in the\n/implementation/ of the program. It's saying \"for the remainder of my\nexecution, I should only do these types of operations; if I try to do anything\nelse, I have cracked & compromised.\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.193"
    },
    {
        "id": 16538828,
        "hacker": "LukeShu",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 360,
        "comment": "From the article:\n\n> _Update: it was [an accident][1], which Linus responded to in his usual\n> fashion._\n\n> _[1]:http://lkml.iu.edu/hypermail/linux/kernel/1603.2/01926.html _\n\nThose who only know Linus from his rants might be surprised that here \"his\nusual fashion\" means:\n\n\\- Acknowledging that the root cause was Github's documentation being\nmisleading.\n\n\\- Not blaming the contributor for being mislead by Github: \"I can see why\nthat documentation would make you think it's the right thing to do.\"\n\n\\- Admit that the ease with which the accident happened is a deficiency in\nGit's UI.\n\n\\- CC the Git maintainer to discuss improving Git to make it harder to do this\nby accident. (Which eventually lead to the --allow-unrelated-histories flag\nbeing needed to do this kind of merge.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.055"
    },
    {
        "id": 5308487,
        "hacker": "LukeShu",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 360,
        "comment": "For the lazy: http://arxiv.org/abs/1301.6628\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 9160724,
        "hacker": "beachstartup",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 361,
        "comment": "ah yes, standard issue anti-male shaming tactic #7. if they don't agree with\nyou, call them immature! it's so easy! you don't even have to respond to what\nthey say! or even read what they say!\n\nalso, try these handy dandy variants, always just a mouse click away:\n\n* call them virgins\n\n* call them bitter\n\n* call them angry\n\n* call them cowards\n\n* call them jealous\n\n* call them gay\n\n* call them crazy\n\n* call them selfish\n\n* call them ugly (ouch!)\n\nand of course, everyone's favorite:\n\n* call them creepy! there's _literally no_ recourse for that one! super effective!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.007"
    },
    {
        "id": 6777933,
        "hacker": "beachstartup",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 361,
        "comment": "ah yes, the ol' condescending \"you'll find someone someday\" line.\n\ndid you ever consider that some (many, actually) people are not optimizing for\nlong term mating strategy, and are rather playing the game to maximize short-\nterm sexual rewards?\n\nor does that simply not exist as a valid goal in your worldview, because you\nrefuse to acknowledge its legitimacy?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.079"
    },
    {
        "id": 8111819,
        "hacker": "beachstartup",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 361,
        "comment": "in a walking vs. driving lifestyle, you don't just double your walking, you\nmore than likely 10X your walking. 20X on an exceptionally busy day.\n\ni live in LA but my 'moves' app tells me that when traveling to walking\ncities, on a busy day i burn 600+ calories walking. at home it's around 100.\nsometimes less. this is quantified via GPS and an understanding of human\nbiology. if you choose not to believe this, you're picking another fight\nentirely.\n\na delta of 500 calories a day combined with eating just a little less, or of\nhealthier foods is rapid weight loss. it's why people can easily lose weight\non a vacation to europe or asia.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.062"
    },
    {
        "id": 13615550,
        "hacker": "beachstartup",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 361,
        "comment": "i started out in tech as a teenager doing data entry and software installs. if\nyou haven't done a similar job yet for at least a year or two, re-evaluate\nyour expectations.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 12082401,
        "hacker": "sytse",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 362,
        "comment": "I'm sorry to hear that. Consider emailing support@gitlab.com if you keep\nhaving problems with email not being delivered.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 17382779,
        "hacker": "sytse",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 362,
        "comment": "Thanks for linking the issue. I'll discuss it with our product leaders.\n\nRegarding the documentation we see many people switching to static websites\ngenerated with GitLab pages. This allows you to separate the change from the\napproval. Is this an option for you?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 11488126,
        "hacker": "sytse",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 362,
        "comment": "Voting at GitLab is mostly thumbs up for good code and leave line comments for\nbad code. We don't vote bad code down, downvoting is mostly for issues with\nfeature requests that are controversial.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.099"
    },
    {
        "id": 12818359,
        "hacker": "nickbauman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 363,
        "comment": "I was going to say \"amateurish\" but I think your \"dilettantism\" is spot-on.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 15969574,
        "hacker": "nickbauman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 363,
        "comment": "You're right, and now I cannot edit it!\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.357"
    },
    {
        "id": 13025634,
        "hacker": "nickbauman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 363,
        "comment": "In MN optical voting processors are OK because the paper ballot is always\nthere to back up the electronic version. Not perfect but a decent compromise.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.042"
    },
    {
        "id": 15413176,
        "hacker": "nickbauman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 363,
        "comment": "> Our media and our government lied to generate a case for war\n\nRemember Vietnam? Same thing happened. GoT Incident was a joke.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_of_Tonkin_incident\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7630317,
        "hacker": "argonaut",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 364,
        "comment": "In the tech world, the YC signal > H/M/S signal.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13332452,
        "hacker": "argonaut",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 364,
        "comment": "You can publish. Those are called stories. People can follow you on Snapchat\n(by username).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10937037,
        "hacker": "argonaut",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 364,
        "comment": "The actual article: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-facebook-oculus-rift-\nrulin....\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7594169,
        "hacker": "niutech",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 365,
        "comment": "LGTM: https://filippo.io/Heartbleed/#mint.com\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11726904,
        "hacker": "niutech",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 365,
        "comment": "Sirius (http://sirius.clarity-lab.org/) is open source and self-hosted.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9446876,
        "hacker": "niutech",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 365,
        "comment": "Here is the comparison between Flywheel, Opera Turbo and Mozilla Janus:\nhttp://browsingthenet.blogspot.com/2014/09/chrome-data-compr...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9763197,
        "hacker": "JupiterMoon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 366,
        "comment": "Netflix are at least on record as saying that they want content to be global.\nHowever, they are also on record as saying that in principle using a vpn to\naccess US Netflix is piracy (but that they don't think it is important). I am\nhowever curious what happens when some copyright troll decides to subpoena\nthem for their records on who might be connecting from known vpns.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12033367,
        "hacker": "JupiterMoon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 366,
        "comment": "Maybe she doesn't want her non outlook using friends to have to wonder what AW\nmeans?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10377056,
        "hacker": "JupiterMoon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 366,
        "comment": "There are solar powered solutions for air conditioning.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9874074,
        "hacker": "JupiterMoon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 366,
        "comment": "Apply for a job with a shipping company?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12012456,
        "hacker": "mhartl",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 367,
        "comment": "The book itself is here:\n\nhttp://railstutorial.org/book\n\nThe links in the announcement include a 20% launch discount, expiring tonight\nat midnight PDT.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6809835,
        "hacker": "mhartl",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 367,
        "comment": "The downvoter of the parent comment probably didn't notice that it's an\nanagram for \"I see what you did there\".\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 167259,
        "hacker": "mhartl",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 367,
        "comment": "I like classical while programming. Check out Otto's Baroque Musick:\nhttp://www.shoutcast.com/directory/index.phtml?sgenre=Classi...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 21440690,
        "hacker": "swiley",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 368,
        "comment": "Having an argument for why rather than just being handed a formula helps me. I\ndon’t see why people think this would make it harder.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 13298983,
        "hacker": "swiley",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 368,
        "comment": "Every STEM student at my university learns enough to do this as a freshman, I\ndon't think most are ever actually asked to though.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 16819655,
        "hacker": "swiley",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 368,
        "comment": "The problem with the ubuntu phone is that they built a special phone UI. None\nof the GUI desktop software ran and neither did software from any other OS. On\ntop of that the battery life was awful.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.067"
    },
    {
        "id": 9588474,
        "hacker": "username3",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 369,
        "comment": "Recruiters on OkCupid?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4392701,
        "hacker": "username3",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 369,
        "comment": "Square should automatically wave fees after collecting $275 per month.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4287007,
        "hacker": "username3",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 369,
        "comment": "Government cover up. The government wouldn't play AC/DC, so it must be someone\nelse.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14807322,
        "hacker": "Navarr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 370,
        "comment": "I think they're just using their internal entropy generator. They use the lava\nlamps as part of that, and the internal generator for all sorts of stuff.\n\nhttps://twitter.com/grittygrease/status/727587915090403328\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6763980,
        "hacker": "Navarr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 370,
        "comment": "I play my WiiU. I'm going to assume that counts.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4121370,
        "hacker": "Navarr",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 370,
        "comment": "I understand, but I believe as others have pointed out that ICANN would deny\nsaid applications.\n\nAnd if the spammers/scammers have enough money to afford the infrastructure\nnecessary for a TLD, I think we may have a bigger problem.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18336350,
        "hacker": "kryptiskt",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 371,
        "comment": "Cloud companies can use GPL code without contributing back as they're not\ndistributing it.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 7457893,
        "hacker": "kryptiskt",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 371,
        "comment": "ACPI isn't going away on PCs, ditching it means ditching PCs as a target.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 8543814,
        "hacker": "kryptiskt",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 371,
        "comment": "It doesn't help that the scientific team refuses to share images from their\nhigh-res instrument: http://cumbriansky.wordpress.com/2014/10/08/an-open-\nletter-t...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12779949,
        "hacker": "mort96",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 372,
        "comment": "This. I personally agree with everyone saying const > let, but I just don't\nfind myself caring enough about it to add the inconvenience of typing 5\ncharacters instead of 3 every time I need to create a variable.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14706415,
        "hacker": "mort96",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 372,
        "comment": "How are you supposed to make data structures which work with any type without\nvoid pointers in C?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 17464112,
        "hacker": "mort96",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 372,
        "comment": "No.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 21252633,
        "hacker": "neonate",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 373,
        "comment": "https://web.archive.org/web/20191012004755/https://www.bloom...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18742164,
        "hacker": "neonate",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 373,
        "comment": "Why don't you share some with the employees?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20513363,
        "hacker": "neonate",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 373,
        "comment": "http://archive.is/N7blH\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18415704,
        "hacker": "ukyrgf",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 374,
        "comment": "I just signed up, and this is what you see after you create an account:\nhttps://i.imgur.com/uHponvi.png\n\nVerify online, verify by mail, or... skip. When I hit skip it just sent me to\na dashboard that says I'm not enrolled because I'm not verified. I'm gonna let\nthis sit for a few days and see if I start getting the emails.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 13496299,
        "hacker": "ukyrgf",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 374,
        "comment": "I always preferred StaxRip. It ties all the tools together like Handbrake but\ngave you all the power of the CLI. It looks like the author is trying to\ncompletely re-work it in x64 now: https://github.com/stax76/staxrip\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 14271418,
        "hacker": "ukyrgf",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 374,
        "comment": "That font-weight/color is nearly unreadable on my Windows 10 machine.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 8675074,
        "hacker": "bigbugbag",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 375,
        "comment": "That's what I came to the comments for.\n\nwikicreole webmaster, please do configure your DNS thoughtfully, and OP please\ncheck your links before posting.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 15690527,
        "hacker": "bigbugbag",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 375,
        "comment": "and yandex.\n\nhttps://duck.co/help/results/sources\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10945099,
        "hacker": "bigbugbag",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 375,
        "comment": "Isn't that a known fact that US police train their k-9 to false alert to get\nprobable cause for a search ?\n\nThere's this video by Ex narcotic police officer Barry Cooper that features a\nsegment on k9 false alerts:\nhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-mU77Pie44&t=23m30s\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 19303438,
        "hacker": "Aloha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 376,
        "comment": "I'd agree with you.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 6810284,
        "hacker": "Aloha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 376,
        "comment": "Unemployment does work as insurance - the difference it, the beneficiary is\nnot the one paying for it - their employer does - and I, the employee takes\nsome of that thru lower wages.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4644107,
        "hacker": "Aloha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 376,
        "comment": "This does not surprise me at all - the telecom network is unbelievably\nfragile.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18233943,
        "hacker": "jstanley",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 377,
        "comment": "Yes\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18308453,
        "hacker": "jstanley",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 377,
        "comment": "He was there to be an independent observer, but he is appointed by the\nclaimant, see the link posted elsewhere in this thread:\nhttps://www.inbrief.co.uk/civil-court/search-orders/\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 12862913,
        "hacker": "jstanley",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 377,
        "comment": "Letting parliament vote on something after _everybody_ has already had the\nchance to vote on it is not democracy, it's letting the political elite\noverrule the decision of the people.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10648394,
        "hacker": "robzyb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 378,
        "comment": "The Raspberry Pi runs on a fixed 5 volts. At a fixed voltage power will scale\nlinearly with current.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.067"
    },
    {
        "id": 9440740,
        "hacker": "robzyb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 378,
        "comment": "It might not be insider trading in a legal sense, but in a moral sense it\nkinda is.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.100"
    },
    {
        "id": 7193392,
        "hacker": "robzyb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 378,
        "comment": "> If you seriously think regulators care about money laundering\n\nI think that _WE_ should care about money laundering.\n\nI think that _WE_ should care about the HSBC situation.\n\nAnd consequently I think that everyone should care about the potential for\nBitcoin to be used for money laundering.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 10689163,
        "hacker": "akerro",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 379,
        "comment": "Windows 10 lets you share your WiFi password with your Facebook friends.\nThat's technically a shared WiFi isn't it?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15843263,
        "hacker": "akerro",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 379,
        "comment": "What's that?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11914904,
        "hacker": "akerro",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 379,
        "comment": "On mobile I installed AdAway.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9977778,
        "hacker": "T-A",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 380,
        "comment": "A C# FOSS project which could use some help is http://opensimulator.org\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 9926489,
        "hacker": "T-A",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 380,
        "comment": "After the official launch on July 29 they will probably reopen the Windows\nInsider program for signups, so keep an eye on https://insider.windows.com/\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19012098,
        "hacker": "T-A",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 380,
        "comment": "I don't think final figures for 2018 are out yet. For 2017:\n\nhttps://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&u=https...\n\nhttps://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&u=https...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 17191020,
        "hacker": "duality",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 381,
        "comment": "Sounds related to but subtly different from a\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giffen_good.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 16456597,
        "hacker": "duality",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 381,
        "comment": "In what sense does string theory predict any aspect of Lorentzian symmetry?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18776931,
        "hacker": "duality",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 381,
        "comment": "Wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BGP_hijacking\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19783915,
        "hacker": "jayess",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 382,
        "comment": "I presume that's just one direction?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18460269,
        "hacker": "jayess",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 382,
        "comment": "Sorta how 1 + 1 = 2 is oversimplified for laymen.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 16403304,
        "hacker": "jayess",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 382,
        "comment": "Well, if Tolstoy says so, then there is no arguing...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10027560,
        "hacker": "jayess",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 382,
        "comment": "tl;dr: Wah wah, Socialist magazine hates Amazon.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19696305,
        "hacker": "jayess",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 382,
        "comment": "Is the Netherlands sinking though?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4737303,
        "hacker": "kiba",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 383,
        "comment": "Nice hypothesis, but where's the lab result?\n\nI highly encourage people to think skeptically and scientific as well using\nthe self quantitative approach to self improvement, even when they're certain\nwhen their theory is right.\n\nFor example, I am measuring blood pressure, steps count, weight, blood sugar\nlevel, awake and sleep time everyday. I also just recently concluded that\nwalking 10K steps have almost no effect on my weight or very subtle one.\n\nhttp://kibabase.com/articles/self-quantification#interventio...\n\nIn the future, when I finish my analysis, other people might decide to\nreplicate my experiment or comes up with their own conclusion based on the\ndata I gathered.\n\nAlthough how one could test the idea proposed in the blog is unclear to me. I\nlike the idea of having a clean desk or clean environment though. The ugly\nenvironment in my house doesn't appears to deter me from getting things done,\nthough.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.045"
    },
    {
        "id": 2386050,
        "hacker": "kiba",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 383,
        "comment": "Would anybody be interested in one-time multibillion dollars profit-making\nopportunities?\n\nWhat prevent such formation of profit-making opportunities?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.125"
    },
    {
        "id": 1796219,
        "hacker": "kiba",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 383,
        "comment": "Resorting to _let me google that for you_ to construct your reply mean you\naren't taking me seriously.\n\nI am told that deflation is a bad thing actually assume many things to be\ntrue.\n\n1\\. Deflation is the result of collapsing monetary base. However, the bitcoin\neconomy isn't experiencing anything remotely similar to what you think is\ngoing to happen. The Bitcoin economy is experiencing growth deflation.\n\n2\\. Assumption that retention of cash is not investment. To the holder of\ncash, it is an investment. The economy, on the other hand, see money retention\nas a forecast of time preference.\n\nMoverover, an inflationary regime favor investors and producers. A hard money\nregime like bitcoins favor the average joe who are consumer and savior of\nmoney.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.169"
    },
    {
        "id": 12814749,
        "hacker": "kiba",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 383,
        "comment": "Elon Musk made himself into an expert.\n\nI would consider him an authority on rocketry.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4173390,
        "hacker": "wavephorm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 384,
        "comment": "\n    \n    \n      still use Apple's WebKit-based engine required by the App Store developer guidelines\n    \n\nThis is pretty retarded, and should really be looked at by the DoJ. To hobble\nall web browsers like this is something that even Microsoft, at the height of\ntheir dominance, didn't even attempt.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.117"
    },
    {
        "id": 2954028,
        "hacker": "wavephorm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 384,
        "comment": "But if they are so busy building a movie notification system, how will they\nhave time to create a programming language for a new computing platform?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.118"
    },
    {
        "id": 3062143,
        "hacker": "wavephorm",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 384,
        "comment": "Why is this language continually hyped to no end on HN?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 5107220,
        "hacker": "anthonyb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 385,
        "comment": "No, Linus is often gratuitously rude.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 2335649,
        "hacker": "anthonyb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 385,
        "comment": "OpenBTS is already here: http://www.networkworld.com/news/2010/083010-open-\nsource-voi...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 1251616,
        "hacker": "anthonyb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 385,
        "comment": "English is a very hard language to learn, so don't feel bad. There aren't many\nsimple, clear rules, and it's all weird edge cases and homonyms and you have\nto figure out which is which from context. Everyone has to figure it out\nthrough trial and error - including native English speakers.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.122"
    },
    {
        "id": 5359867,
        "hacker": "anthonyb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 385,
        "comment": "Insulin spikes are completely relevant, since insulin signals your fat cells\nto take up energy from your blood stream. Now you have no energy and feel\nhungry again.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 4528055,
        "hacker": "anthonyb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 385,
        "comment": "Early education and intervention saves a ton of money in the long term.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 4870245,
        "hacker": "anthonyb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 385,
        "comment": "kwestin, you've been hellbanned - no idea why, looks like a mistake to me.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10668979,
        "hacker": "Peaker",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 386,
        "comment": "I agree with everything you said :)\n\nI also think Lisp is not truly \"better\" in the sense \"worse-is-better\" is\nascribing. But if we suspend disbelief - then the Go vs. Rust story matches\nthe one described in \"Worse is better\".\n\nPerhaps Rust will win out in the end and \"worse is better\" won't prevail.\nDespite liking the idea of Rust very much, I don't think it will.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.282"
    },
    {
        "id": 7309121,
        "hacker": "Peaker",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 386,
        "comment": "OTOH, bugs in auto-generated code are much less common.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.233"
    },
    {
        "id": 5732845,
        "hacker": "Peaker",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 386,
        "comment": "If you have:\n\n    \n    \n      foo (Just a) = bar a\n    \n\nIt is typically followed, on the next line by:\n\n    \n    \n      foo Nothing = ...\n    \n\nAnd if it isn't, and you use -Wall (you really should!) you will get a warning\nfor writing a partial function (which is sometimes warranted, but is a smell).\n\nThe function \"fromJust\" which is equivalent to \"getValue\" is very rarely\nuseful, and considered a smell: making that one of the primary ways to use\nyour Maybe value is a very bad idea.\n\n    \n    \n      if (isNothing (m))\n      { .. }\n      else \n      { .. m.getValue() .. }\n    \n\nIs much less safe than:\n\n    \n    \n      case m of\n        Nothing -> { .. }\n        Just val -> .. val ..\n    \n\nAnd has no useful advantage...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.004"
    },
    {
        "id": 2358844,
        "hacker": "Peaker",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 386,
        "comment": "Can you link to the context of that statement?\n\nI think maybe he was trying to say something else, but said it in a\nmisleading/funny way?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11516425,
        "hacker": "Peaker",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 386,
        "comment": "> PFP and typing are quite orthogonal\n\nThey are orthogonal in 1 technical sense. But the benefits are reaped from the\ncombination.\n\n> the PFP abstraction has so far failed to yield results commensurate with its\n> cost.\n\nYou say this based on what? Me and other Haskell users believe that the costs\nare very minimal and the benefits are quite huge.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.042"
    },
    {
        "id": 10147745,
        "hacker": "munchbunny",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 387,
        "comment": "I wouldn't call it \"no appreciation of good music\". The minutiae of a specific\ngenre/era of music is a niche interest even among musicians. Doesn't mean it's\nnot interesting, but it's definitely a niche.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.027"
    },
    {
        "id": 19627942,
        "hacker": "munchbunny",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 387,
        "comment": "Is this based on a hardware security module in the phone? I don't see this\nwritten anywhere in the blog post.\n\nFor something like this, especially with your phone, putting the private keys\nout of reach of the CPU/memory and hardened against side channel attacks is\ntable stakes.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18899362,
        "hacker": "munchbunny",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 387,
        "comment": "Or the system should allow \"TBD\" as a grade, or we should fix whatever reason\nthe teacher was forced to put in a placeholder grade in the first place.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.025"
    },
    {
        "id": 9139202,
        "hacker": "deathanatos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 388,
        "comment": "> Wait until you see a badly managed git server that serves a central\n> repository. You'll quickly change your mind if pushes start failing\n> randomly.\n\nBut I can't code a better sysadmin into either git or Perforce. A badly\nmanaged Perforce server will have the same issues. (Unless, of course, you\nhave an argument that Perforce under bad management somehow performs better\nthan git under similar conditions.)\n\nWith git, however, I can still commit, and I can still push and pull changes\nfrom other people using side channels such as email. I can, for the most part,\nkeep working. Is it more difficult? Of course. But in the particular scenario,\ngit outperforms Perforce, in my opinion. (But this is not the primary reason I\nuse git; at work, we use GitHub and git in very much a centralized manner.\nGitHub has its outages, and they're annoying. But not work-ending.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.046"
    },
    {
        "id": 7403022,
        "hacker": "deathanatos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 388,
        "comment": "It's _hard_ to write a portable shell script. My dotfiles need to be portable,\nand they involve a lot of shell. Every time I introduce a new OS, I have to\nmake changes. Various oddities get you. These, for example, look really\ninnocent but aren't portable:\n\n    \n    \n      find -iname 'foo*'  # [1]\n      ... | sed -e 's/ab\\+c//'  # [2]\n      ... | sed -i -e 's/abc//'  # [3]\n      tar -xf some-archive.tar.gz  # [4]\n      python -c 'anything'  # [5]\n    \n\nThings like messing around with /proc are more obvious, but things like curl\n(is curl installed? what do we do if it isn't? try wget?) can be hard too.\n\n[1]: find doesn't assume CWD on all POSIX OSs [2]: \"+\" isn't POSIX. You have\nto \\\\{1,\\\\} that. [3]: -i requires an argument on some OSs. [4]: This is\nstretching the definition of portable a bit; I've worked on machines where you\n_had_ to specify -z to tar, given a compressed archive. (tar has been able to\nfigure out compression on extraction for well over a decade now, so -z is\nusually optional, but some places are _really_ slow to upgrade.) [5]: Unless\nanything is a Python 2/3 polyglot, you'd better hope that you guess correctly\nthat Python 2 was installed. (And it's really hard here: python is either\npython 2 or 3 on some systems, depending on age & configuration, with python2\nand python3 pointing to that exact version, but on some machines, python2\ndoesn't exist even if Python is installed, despite PEP-394.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.074"
    },
    {
        "id": 15761540,
        "hacker": "deathanatos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 388,
        "comment": "> _my domain credentials are used to log into the VPN, and TFS, and Octopus.\n> Compromising just that one set of credentials could effectively \"own\" our\n> company._\n\nThis is why 2FA is important! I worked for a company that had a very similar\nsetup: I essentially had a single \"LDAP\" password. But: everything web-browser\nwent through a single sign-on site, and it required 2FA (and so, you were\n_never_ entering your password into even random internal applications: there\nwas exactly one page where you should log in). Terminal stuff had a similar\nflow that _also_ required 2FA (e.g., for SSH). As a user, the experience was\nnot painful at all.\n\nIt does seem like, however, from an operations standpoint, getting such a\nsetup in the first place is _not_ trivial.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.101"
    },
    {
        "id": 17562639,
        "hacker": "deathanatos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 388,
        "comment": "I've had a doctors office tell me that it was literally impossible for them to\nestimate, let alone quote me, a price for how much my visit would cost.\n\n(My finger was infected. I needed a week of antibiotics. That was it.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.233"
    },
    {
        "id": 14471202,
        "hacker": "deathanatos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 388,
        "comment": "> _Why do programmers feel the need to convince other programmers to switch to\n> a different language?_\n\nBecause they themselves derived some benefit from it, and believe the other\nparty would too, if only they would try it.\n\nSometimes, I don't think it's just benefits, but certain languages offer\ndifferent ways of doing things that other languages really could benefit from.\nOur older languages teach us things as we use them, like that nullable\npointers as our only reference type were a bad idea. Encouraging others to use\nlanguages that adopt different ideals would seem to be to just be people\ntrying to get people to see the merits of those ideals.\n\n> _Why get into religious wars?_\n\nBecause we're still using languages with nullable pointers. More seriously,\nbecause people care about the quality of their work, and you don't always get\nto pick the tool for the job. And it can very well be that there _isn 't_ a\ngood tool for the job, but only and okay tool for the job: while I use Python\nextensively at my job, and while its speed of development definitely benefits\nmy team, I would kill for some static typing. (I've been looking into mypy for\nthis reason, but being on Python 3 would help…)\n\nAnd people don't always use the right tool for the job, or I'd be done trying\nto explain why they should not be using raw bytestrings for text. They didn't\npick the wrong tool for the job — they simply don't understand that actual\nstring types exist, or why they should use them. (It doesn't help when the\nlanguage/library's obvious choice is the _wrong_ choice.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.022"
    },
    {
        "id": 12168617,
        "hacker": "deathanatos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 388,
        "comment": "And it works out of the box? Doesn't Teredo necessitate using a relay (someone\nto translate to native IPv6) – does MS just have one set up somewhere, and\npreconfigured?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19949955,
        "hacker": "deathanatos",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 388,
        "comment": "For the most part, when you do I/O to some external system, if it's text, you\nencode/decode at the border to that system. Interally, all text data is `str`\n(or `unicode` in 2) and all binary data is `bytes` (in both).\n\nIn some cases of common OS-induced pain, I'd say \"do whatever 3 does\" in 2,\nsince that'll make migration easier in the long run. (But I understand that\ncan be hard, and I think my responses to your examples below even demonstrate\nthat to be hard.)\n\nTo your specific pain points:\n\n> _Unicode stdio?_\n\nMostly, `io` should handle this in both 3/2\\. You might need to help it get\nthe right encoding in 2.\n\n> _Unicode file paths_\n\nThis is going to be a mess in _any_ language, because file paths really aren't\ntext. On _nix, they 're byte strings that don't have nuls in them. _Hopefully*\nthey're encoded according to LANG, and _hopefully_ LANG is a UTF-8 variant,\nbut it isn't required, and it isn't required that two users on the same system\nuse compatible LANGs, so you get a Tower of Babel. I _really_ wish OSs would\njust start enforcing a. Unicode filenames, and b. no newlines in filenames;\nthose two alone would make life so much easier.\n\nHopefully you've seen os.fsencode / fsdecode, but alas those aren't in 2, so\nI'm not sure they really help you. Often one is not really munging paths that\nmuch, and can just pass through whatever value/type you get, but it does\nhappen, of course. (E.g., adding or removing extensions)\n\n> _Unicode sys.argv_\n\nThis is also a pain point, since again, the underlying type in _nix is a byte\nstring without nuls. I 'd hope it decodes w/ the LANG encoding, but since the\nuser could easily tab-complete a filename, fsencode/decode might be more\nappropriate. I think I'd say \"do whatever 3 does\".\n\n1 Jan 2020 is nearly here. Forget about 2 / assume UTF-8 in 2 and don't\nsupport anything else?\n\n> _I feel like Python 3 completely wrecked strings instead of making them\n> better.*\n\nA clear separation of text and binary is needed in the long run, and makes\nother operations much clearer and saner. The pain you're feeling is introduced\nfrom the OS not having the same clarity.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.090"
    },
    {
        "id": 5042467,
        "hacker": "dangrossman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 389,
        "comment": "http://www.improvely.com, http://www.w3counter.com, and two dozen other sites\nover the years. Revenue in the millions over the past 8 years I've been self-\nemployed, and I'm not taking a pay cut versus what I'd earn in industry if I\nhad gone that route instead.\n\nI've run into many limitations that have prevented me from offering products,\nservice plans and sales strategies that would've been profitable but required\nmore employees. I could hire, but I enjoy what I do, and switching from what I\ndo to hiring and managing sales/support/ops teams is a totally different job I\nwouldn't enjoy so much.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.203"
    },
    {
        "id": 1870909,
        "hacker": "dangrossman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 389,
        "comment": "It's not about support. This only matters to you if you use MySQL as an\nembedded database in software you distribute, as that's the _only_ use MySQL\nClassic Edition is licensed for.\n\nYou buy support contracts completely separately, on their support page, not\ntheir product (binary licensing) page.\n\nThe FUD today on HN regarding MySQL is just confusing people.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.007"
    },
    {
        "id": 3538089,
        "hacker": "dangrossman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 389,
        "comment": "It's not the registrar but the registry (Verisign) they go to. Lots of people\nswitched from GoDaddy to Gandi last month, a French registrar, but that won't\nhelp against this .. problem.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 5562888,
        "hacker": "dangrossman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 389,
        "comment": "Statistically, things do not often go wrong with PayPal. The number of \"horror\nstories\" is extremely _low_ for a payment service with hundreds of millions of\naccounts and $145 billion in payment volume. Regardless, the idea here is to\nbe quick and dirty to accept occasional payments. There's no risk there since\nyou can immediately withdraw the payment. If your account gets closed, who\ncares. You don't need a Stripe account, a Heroku app, and devops knowledge\nwhen copying and pasting a PayPal button or telling someone to send money to\nyour e-mail would suffice.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.144"
    },
    {
        "id": 7066336,
        "hacker": "dangrossman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 389,
        "comment": "So do lots of people that get ticketed anyway.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 10932151,
        "hacker": "dangrossman",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 389,
        "comment": "The showroom inventory is an actual sales channel. It's not some back channel\ninsider process.\n\nIt's behind the \"Buy Pre-Owned Today\" link on Tesla's public website.\n\nhttps://www.teslamotors.com/models/preowned\n\nThe site has one top-level menu where you can choose new, pre-owned or custom\nto start your order. Everyone's in the same system.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.044"
    },
    {
        "id": 18714787,
        "hacker": "mjg59",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 390,
        "comment": "Peak headtimes on BART are a train every 2-3 minutes, with trains carrying up\nto 1400 people (let's call it 1000 for the sake of argument). So at the low\nend, that's around 20,000 people an hour. If you had cars with a headway of 5\nseconds then that's 1200 cars an hour, so you'd need an average occupancy of\nover 16 people per car. That's unrealistic, so yes, a subway tunnel has more\ncapacity.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.038"
    },
    {
        "id": 5787390,
        "hacker": "mjg59",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 390,
        "comment": "The spec says that the feature should be disabled if any UEFI boot entry other\nthan \"Windows Boot Manager\" is chosen. Whether that's actually implemented, I\ndon't know.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.108"
    },
    {
        "id": 11512664,
        "hacker": "mjg59",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 390,
        "comment": "We know how the platforms work in general, but 386-era is when SMM appears for\nthe first time and so it's unlikely that anybody has full knowledge of the\nentirety of a specific system.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.030"
    },
    {
        "id": 13402922,
        "hacker": "mjg59",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 390,
        "comment": "Even when written, the study made inaccurate claims about rkt (the SELinux\nsupport in rkt is identical to that in Docker, because rkt uses the same code\nfrom libcontainer - there is literally no difference there). It certainly\nwasn't an accurate depiction of rkt's state of security as of August.\n\n(Disclaimer: I implemented some, but definitely not all, of those security\nfeatures in rkt, and I currently work at CoreOS)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.123"
    },
    {
        "id": 413280,
        "hacker": "whacked_new",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 391,
        "comment": "\"In some ways, this is a restatement of the Dip. Being the best in the world\nbrings extraordinary benefits, but it's not easy to get there.\"\n\nNot The Dip... ... the devil's in the details, which The Dip has nothing to do\nwith. If you cast a wide and fuzzy net you can claim you said a lot by saying\na little.\n\n/I read that book and am not entirely unabashed about it. If anybody wants\nthat book, just to find out why, let me know. Geographic constraints apply.\nBut don't shell out howevermany dollars it is at the bookstore. _-_-_\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.129"
    },
    {
        "id": 593305,
        "hacker": "whacked_new",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 391,
        "comment": "There is some brilliance going on here:\n\nhttp://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/redmond/groups/cue/bc...\n\nresearch.microsoft.com/otherplaces as well. Corporate-backed R&D, plain and\nsimple. The only unfortunate thing is they are mostly hidden from the public\neye, and the consumer market.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.147"
    },
    {
        "id": 499707,
        "hacker": "whacked_new",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 391,
        "comment": "Lycos maybe? Excite? Go.com? (hit or miss)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 21388,
        "hacker": "whacked_new",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 391,
        "comment": "you are right; point taken.\n\nthe thing is, well, as a casual observer, i have noticed that in USA, take tv\nads for example, you would hear the company name repeated over and over.\nOverstock.com Bigredo.com hotels.com... blah blah. In Japan, I recall a higher\nfrequency of ads, static and TV alike, go \"search for blah.\"\n\nbut yeah, i have zero research behind that claim.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.027"
    },
    {
        "id": 15064,
        "hacker": "whacked_new",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 391,
        "comment": "i don't like the smell of this...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11039173,
        "hacker": "prawn",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 392,
        "comment": "I noted that they look to repoint your brick work also.\n\nAlso, I have a cleaner but prefer them to leave some of the spiders in my\nhouse. Those spiders hopefully deter the more dangerous ones (redbacks, white-\ntailed, etc) and their webs hopefully frustrate mosquitoes.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.033"
    },
    {
        "id": 891067,
        "hacker": "prawn",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 392,
        "comment": "(Not your target market, but I'm sure with some work your site could be\ninteresting to some.)\n\n1\\. As someone has already said, feature the photos more strongly in your\nlayout. Otherwise what you've put up is a little too like Twitter Lists,\nright?\n\n2\\. Maybe make their name and photo larger (even if it means using a stronger\nphoto that isn't their current avatar).\n\n3\\. Upgrade the design - it's pretty bland and not very \"celeb\". Needs to be\nbrighter and bolder.\n\n4\\. You'll want to have more countries represented before plugging it to the\npublic - I'm sure you could do a country per evening for a couple of weeks,\njust find a list of movie and sports stars, track them down online and get\nthem into your database.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.191"
    },
    {
        "id": 7395916,
        "hacker": "prawn",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 392,
        "comment": "I have thought about this before and came to the same conclusion. If you want\na serious debate site, then you have to dig deeper to resolve the finer points\nthat make up a broader issue.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.167"
    },
    {
        "id": 12006479,
        "hacker": "prawn",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 392,
        "comment": "For anyone yet to read the article who is initially confused (as I was),\nbesides the Kiva you might know from microlending, there's also a Kiva who\nmake industrial robots for warehouses. As per the article, Amazon bought the\nlatter Kiva and forced competitors to turn to alternatives that were yet to be\ndeveloped.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 10139675,
        "hacker": "prawn",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 392,
        "comment": "Lower prices for on-demand vehicles will mean that car ownership declines.\nMost people don't care too much about the brand of taxi or plane they take\nalready. Once the price/efficiency mix is right, I will quickly ditch my\nsecond car.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.168"
    },
    {
        "id": 19308945,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "And I haven't had a power supply break yet. I still do not understand how\npeople manage to ruin these things, unless they're yanking them from the cord\nitself or twisting it around. It seems like they stay together if you put just\na bit of care into keeping them intact?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 14973123,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "File a Radar and someone will get around to fixing it:\nhttp://bugreport.apple.com/\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15288303,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "> Unfortunately a lot of developpers will not be able to update their app with\n> the new Apple Guideline released this Year.\n\nWhich part of the guidelines, specifically?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.045"
    },
    {
        "id": 16088294,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "I've been looking for something like <() for a long time. Thanks for sharing\nit!\n\nRegarding :h, is it any different than just using dirname?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.067"
    },
    {
        "id": 16161683,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "I'm pretty sure that this mixup is intended. This website trying to look like\nan official Sketch product so that they can capitalize on Sketch's successes.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.375"
    },
    {
        "id": 17740618,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "I don’t understand how you think this should be implemented. Many classes\ninformally conform to protocols or in some cases the conformance can only be\nchecked at runtime with a respondsToSelector: check. So any generics at\ncompile time stricter than what we currently have will just not work or be\nuseful.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 17832911,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "I'm sure most large, old tech companies have at least one IRC server that\nsomeone's forgotten to shut down. And my employer also uses Jabber, but I'm\npretty sure it's just because it allows them to have complete control over the\nrelay and client.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.190"
    },
    {
        "id": 18008463,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "iOS 12 will likely not be iPhone SE's last update, since iPhone 5S got the\nupdate this year. And iOS 12 specifically focuses on performance for older\ndevices.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.056"
    },
    {
        "id": 18086173,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "Can't both things be bad?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.700"
    },
    {
        "id": 18110973,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "It is hardware linked.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 18530552,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "There are different kinds of safety, though. There's sandboxing, which means\nthat applications running in WebAssembly should not have access to resources\nthey are not privileged to access. And there's memory safety, which means the\nWebAssembly application itself shouldn't try to break guarantees about memory.\nThese are two separate things, and only the first can do things outside of\nbreaking the website you're on.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.062"
    },
    {
        "id": 18627084,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "Huh, interesting. I'm left wondering whether China has a Planetary Protection\nOfficer, though of course the Moon is barren so it doesn't really matter…\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.233"
    },
    {
        "id": 18775707,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "> Anyway, these types of operations come up all the time when working with\n> strings, and these operations are really really incovenient in Swift.\n\nAgain, what are these operations? I think most of the issues people have with\nString is due to hard to discover APIs rather than design issues with String.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.071"
    },
    {
        "id": 19024757,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "> I can tell you with 100% confidence that any of these logic bugs are created\n> by unecessary abstraction.\n\nThat's a lot of confidence…\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19109838,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "The problem with analytics data is that it can look harmless, but it's easy to\nto convert seemingly trivial data into tracking points. For example, consider\nthis: UUID 1234 always watches video between 16:00 and 17:00 UTC, and then\nagain after 02:00. This gives you a pretty good idea where UUID 1234 lives, as\nwell as their daily schedule (perhaps they have a job during that period?\nMaybe the fact they don't watch video at 21:00 means they went out to eat that\nday?)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.346"
    },
    {
        "id": 19466455,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "Yeah, no. 2 GB of RAM is plenty for browsing the web; this isn’t Android where\neverything less than some absurd number of gigabytes (4? 6?) is useless.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.389"
    },
    {
        "id": 19667024,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "> It can always speed up because it's massless\n\nI'd suggest clarifying this statement because it certainly gave me the wrong\nimpression…\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.143"
    },
    {
        "id": 19781123,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "> Could this serve as an incentive for less crime?\n\nWas this sarcasm, or are you actually suggesting that criminals should fear\nextrajudicial \"justice\" of having crimes committed against them and being\nunable to report them?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.222"
    },
    {
        "id": 19836829,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "> Always use fork+exec to spawn the child processes\n\nWhy not posix_spawn?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 19854990,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "Their foray into the services business might make the last part of your\nargument no longer true in the future…\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.175"
    },
    {
        "id": 20072866,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "For antitrust? I’d say it did quite a bit, given that it lead to other\ncompanies being able to enter the market and take over market share from\nMicrosoft.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.188"
    },
    {
        "id": 20086345,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "This sounds like a way to get your app rejected for abusing APIs.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20750342,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "It's out of date; I no longer work at either company.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 20803433,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "I didn't draw that sort of conclusion at all from that email: isn't it just\nsaying that the filesystem has a CRC (for reliability, presumably, not because\nthey are trying to deter fuzzers) and they're frustrated that they keep\ngetting fuzzer reports for things that don't pass that check (and don't matter\nbecause they're caught by the CRC)? They have a specific suite of CRC-aware\nfuzzers that they're still using.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.350"
    },
    {
        "id": 20825850,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "Exploiting undefined behavior is something compilers can and will do; that's\nnot a bug. (Specifically, if a compiler can choose to omit code where it can\nprove that going down that branch would lead to undefined behavior. That's not\nwhat happened here.)\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.156"
    },
    {
        "id": 21383286,
        "hacker": "saagarjha",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 393,
        "comment": "We can’t observe things before recombination, a couple hundred thousand years\nafter the Big Bang, when electrons bound to nuclei and photons stopped being\nconstantly scattered.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 11601991,
        "hacker": "pyre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 394,
        "comment": "> Yes. It is irrational, because the likelihood of rape from a random stranger\n> is actually extremely low.\n\nThis is when averaged across the entire population. A 14 year old girl walking\nthrough a \"bad neighbourhood\" alone at night doesn't necessary carry the same\nrisk of rape that a 6-foot tall, bulky body builder does.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.157"
    },
    {
        "id": 12767574,
        "hacker": "pyre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 394,
        "comment": "Looks like that author has continued down the path of that line of though\nthough, if you look at the books listed on his Wikipedia page:\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clifford_Stoll#Books\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.156"
    },
    {
        "id": 821318,
        "hacker": "pyre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 394,
        "comment": "Depends on the activist. There are people that just think that the livestock\nindustry mistreats the animals (sometimes the animals that are supposed to be\nknocked out make it down the 'assembly line' and are torn apart for meat while\nthey are still alive; though one could argue they may be in shock and not\nfeeling anything).\n\nIn the same way, there are many reasons that people do things like eat\n'organic' meat:\n\n* I don't want the animal to suffer\n\n* I don't want the animal to be 'hopped up' on antibiotics (i.e. having all their food 'laced' with antibiotics)\n\n* I don't want the animal to be 'bio-engineered.' (i.e. farms that 'engineer' their cattle to grow to maturity _very_ \\-- unnaturally -- rapidly in order to increase profits)\n\n* I want the animal to have a 'good life.' (i.e. to spend 99% of their time from birth to death in a cage so small that they can't even turn around)\n\n[ Unfortunately terms like 'organic' don't always mean what people think that\nthey mean. At least in Canada (and I think the US), if an animal on an\n'organic' farm gets sick and needs antibiotics, they have to go to a non-\norganic farm after being treated because all 'organic' livestock can't have\n_any_ antibiotics in them. In general, I don't think that this is what people\nmean when they think about 'organic' farming practices, but sometimes it can\nbe beneficial to humans -- e.g. someone that is allergic to any trace of\ncommon animal antibiotics in the meat that they eat. ]\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.107"
    },
    {
        "id": 827221,
        "hacker": "pyre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 394,
        "comment": "I didn't see much of a complaint about iCal and AddressBook being separate\napps. I saw the major complaints being lack of features in the separated apps.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.119"
    },
    {
        "id": 1078739,
        "hacker": "pyre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 394,
        "comment": "Nothing has been 'taken away' from you. Someone lent you $X to buy something\nthat you thought was worth $X. The value of what you bought has gone down,\nit's now worth $(X-Y). The bank didn't do this. They lent you $X and you're\npaying them back for that $X at the interest rate that you both agreed on.\n\nCars notoriously devalue over time. Are you saying that the bank is stealing\nmoney from you because you new car dropped 10% in value the moment that you\ndrove it off the lot, but you are still paying the bank for a loan of 100% of\nthe original value of the car?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.159"
    },
    {
        "id": 1213713,
        "hacker": "pyre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 394,
        "comment": "How is that different from flat white on black with no syntax highlighting?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.048"
    },
    {
        "id": 1378935,
        "hacker": "pyre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 394,
        "comment": "Now that you mention it, I remember that quirk. I had an issue with _not_\nbeing able to disable that quirk when running a scheduled process. launchd\nwould stop scheduling a process that was scheduled to run every 5 minutes if\none of the runs took less than 60 seconds. It really irked me because this\n60-second-rule only makes sense when you are talking about re-spawning a\nconstantly running process, and should _not_ affect the behaviour of processes\nrunning on a schedule.\n\n> _At first I was kind of upset that this condition was there, but in\n> retrospect it might have been a very wise design choice to stop runaway\n> triggers._\n\nIt doesn't _really_ stop runaway triggers if all of the scripts have a 'sleep\n60' at the end of them. And if you are concerned about runaway triggers you\ncould always make the rule something like \"bail if the process dies after <60s\nmore than once in a 2-minute period\" or similar since there _are_ legitimate\nprocesses out there that take less than 60 seconds to run.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.236"
    },
    {
        "id": 1520083,
        "hacker": "pyre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 394,
        "comment": "\n    \n    \n      > It's built on GTK+ but doesn't depend on GNOME.\n    \n\nIIRC, it still uses gnome-screensaver, gnome-power-manager, etc. Lots of the\nGNOME background processes are in use, unless they've recently weaned\nthemselves...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 1952223,
        "hacker": "pyre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 394,
        "comment": "They win in the long-term if no one calls their bluff (or only minor players\ncall their bluff).\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 2211050,
        "hacker": "pyre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 394,
        "comment": "Based on that assessment, all of Einstein's theories were created using the\n'pillage and plunder' method since he didn't invent the mathematics and/or\nphysics that he based his work on. Please don't try to 'smear' the public\ndomain just because you have a twisted view of the way that IP law should\nwork.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 2630950,
        "hacker": "pyre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 394,
        "comment": "True. If a 'member' of Anonymous was convicted and sentenced to death for\nvandalizing a website, I can see a lot of public outcry. Especially if it is a\nteenager.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.117"
    },
    {
        "id": 2795333,
        "hacker": "pyre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 394,
        "comment": "The only thing that virtualenv does is isolate a set of libraries to use with\nthe default system python. If you have Python 2.6 installed, but want to use\nPython 2.7, you're responsible for setting it up yourself.\n\nOn the other hand, perlbrew allows you to manage completely separate builds of\nperl, and the associated tools like cpan/cpanminus will install to whatever\nthe currently selected Perl is.\n\nFor example, my perlbrew at work looks like this:\n\n    \n    \n      % tree -L 2 ~/perl5/perlbrew\n      ~/perl5/perlbrew/\n      |-- Conf.pm\n      |-- bin\n      |   |-- cpanm\n      |   `-- perlbrew\n      |-- build\n      |   |-- perl-5.12.3\n      |   `-- perl-5.14.1\n      |-- build.log\n      |-- dists\n      |   |-- perl-5.12.3.tar.gz\n      |   `-- perl-5.14.1.tar.gz\n      |-- etc\n      |   |-- bashrc\n      |   `-- cshrc\n      `-- perls\n          |-- current -> perl-5.12.3\n          |-- perl-5.12.3\n          `-- perl-5.14.1\n    \n\nYou source the appropriate ~/perl5/perlbrew/etc/{bash,csh}rc for your shell,\nwhich creates a shell function called perlbrew.\n\n    \n    \n      % type perlbrew\n      perlbrew is a shell function\n      % perlbrew       \n      Usage:\n              perlbrew <command> [options] [arguments]\n      \n              Commonly used commands:\n                  init           Initialize perlbrew environment.\n                  install        Install perl\n                  list           List installed perls\n                  use            Use the specified perl in current shell\n                  switch         Permanently use the specified perl as default\n                  mirror         Pick a preferred mirror site\n                  off            Permanently turn off perlbrew\n                  version        Display version\n                  help           Read more detailed instructions\n      \n              Examples:\n                  perlbrew install perl-5.12.3\n                  perlbrew install perl-5.13.6\n      \n                  perlbrew list\n      \n                  perlbrew use perl-5.13.6\n                  perlbrew switch perl-5.12.3\n      \n                  perlbrew switch /path/to/special/perl\n                  perlbrew switch /path/to/special/perl special-perl\n                  # later\n      % perlbrew list                                                                                                              \n      * perl-5.12.3\n        perl-5.14.1\n        /usr/local/bin/perl (5.8.8)\n        /usr/bin/perl (5.8.8)\n      % perlbrew version\n      ~/perl5/perlbrew/bin/perlbrew  - App::perlbrew/0.19\n      % perlbrew available\n        perl-5.15.1\n      i perl-5.14.1\n        perl-5.12.4\n        perl-5.10.1\n        perl-5.8.9\n        perl-5.6.2\n        perl5.005_04\n        perl5.004_05\n        perl5.003_07\n      % perlbrew install perl-5.10.1\n      Attempting to load conf from ~/perl5/perlbrew/Conf.pm\n      Fetching perl-5.10.1 as ~/perl5/perlbrew/dists/perl-5.10.1.tar.gz\n      Installing perl-5.10.1 into ~/perl5/perlbrew/perls/perl-5.10.1\n      This could take a while. You can run the following command on another shell\n      to track the status:\n      \n        tail -f ~/perl5/perlbrew/build.log\n      \n      (cd ~/perl5/perlbrew/build; tar xzf ~/perl5/perlbrew/dists/perl-5.10.1.tar.gz;\n        cd ~/perl5/perlbrew/build/perl-5.10.1;rm -f config.sh Policy.sh;patchperl;\n        sh Configure -de '-Dprefix=~/perl5/perlbrew/perls/perl-5.10.1';make ;make\n        test_harness && make install) >> '~/perl5/perlbrew/build.log' 2>&1\n      Installed perl-5.10.1 as perl-5.10.1 successfully. Run the following command\n      to switch to it.\n      \n        perlbrew switch perl-5.10.1\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.152"
    },
    {
        "id": 5859105,
        "hacker": "pyre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 394,
        "comment": "CIA does not imply field agent. If you worked for the CIA behind a desk for\nyears, does that give you 'secret agent' skills?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 7032202,
        "hacker": "pyre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 394,
        "comment": "> I'm not making a mountain out of a molehill\n\nI'm not saying that _you_ are, just that these arguments/discussions generally\nare making a mountain out of a mole hill when people go on at length about how\nmuch they hate Python (though they've never used it) because of its semantic\nwhite space.\n\n> I don't understand why the python crowd refuse to acknowledge that having\n> significant whitespace does cause some issues and the benefits are\n> completely subjective.\n\nAll language decisions are trade-offs that come with _some_ downside. I wrote\nPerl for 4 years, and I would still get tripped up by its break/continue\nsyntax (next/last) on occasion since I learned to program in C/C++.\n\nI currently am working heavily in both JavaScript and Python, and I don't have\nany indentation issues swapping between the two languages (probably the issue\nI come across the most of switching between under_scores and camelCase for\nnames). I could probably count on one hand the number of times I've had an\nindentation error in Python.\n\n> Sure unit tests will catch the error but in most other languages the error\n> wouldn't have been introduced in the first place.\n\nBut this is essentially the same argument for static-typing over dynamic-\ntyping, but that doesn't get the same amount of flack as white space in\nPython.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.075"
    },
    {
        "id": 8187594,
        "hacker": "pyre",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 394,
        "comment": "I feel like we need more details to start passing judgement. For all we know\nVSL is trying to claim that their patent gives them a monopoly over an entire\nproblem domain rather than just a specific implementation.\n\nIf Google had decided in the middle of talks that they would just roll their\nown solution, it makes sense to tell their engineers not to touch the details\nof VSL's system, lest it influence their own implementation/solution.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.283"
    },
    {
        "id": 21460872,
        "hacker": "wheelerwj",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 395,
        "comment": "open ended questions are just better in general.\n\nDescribe your next steps...\n\nPlease create a step by step project plan in {tool name}...\n\nAnother issue is waiting two weeks. Never, ever, wait two weeks. With any\noutsourced team you need much more frequent check-ins otherwise you run the\nrisk of being blind-sided by huge project delays.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.221"
    },
    {
        "id": 13796532,
        "hacker": "wheelerwj",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 395,
        "comment": "subscription billing, its definitely one of those big, ugly, nasty hard to\nsolve problems that no one really wants to talk about or address. Definitely\nfalls into the category of \"if its not broke don't fix it.\"\n\nBut payments in general are just totally effed and can't seem to move forward\nwithout some sort of fix. as a consumer its both amazing and incredibly\nfrustrating. as a merchant it's essential. Imagine how much money netflix\nwould lose if you had to auth payments every 30 days.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.103"
    },
    {
        "id": 13416798,
        "hacker": "wheelerwj",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 395,
        "comment": "> I just automatically downvote that.\n\nWe can both agree that one of us needs to change.\n\nThe guidelines are fine, the part you should change is automatically\ndownvoting anything. Just jumping on a bandwagon makes for pretty boring\nreading too.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.111"
    },
    {
        "id": 2845523,
        "hacker": "Steko",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 396,
        "comment": "I think you're prolly selling Android short and leaving money on the table in\nthe process. All reports are that most code is fairly quick to port and the\nsheer number of phones is hard to ignore, even if many of them aren't app\nshoppers, there's still many many many that are and the app store will iterate\nquickly. Chrome sucked too at 1.0.\n\nIf you don't want to deal with the backend on Android there are solutions that\nshouldn't be all that different from Apple's 30% cut.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.261"
    },
    {
        "id": 4955053,
        "hacker": "Steko",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 396,
        "comment": "My bad, looks like this is the case. TFA linked to [1] which seemed to only\nindicate that VZW wasn't allowing it as a default app. But [2] and elsewhere\nindicated VZW had also asked Google to not allow the app on Verizon devices.\n\n[1] http://www.dslreports.com/shownews/Verizon-Were-Blocking-Goo...\n\n[2] http://www.droid-life.com/2012/12/10/verizon-responds-to-fcc...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.350"
    },
    {
        "id": 2795641,
        "hacker": "Steko",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 396,
        "comment": "It's a solid post but this is batting practice by Gruber. Anyone following\nApple would bet the farm on Gruber's shortlist and the only serious candidate\nI'd entertain besides Cook would be Ive. Notably, Gruber missed a chance to\nlink back to the Apple University effort which is another huge giveaway that a\nsuccessor will almost certainly come from within.\n\nGlancing over the archive, imho Gruber's best posts in the last few months\nhave been his iPad 2 review (custom benchmarks!); taking All Things D,\nEngadget, et al. to task for weak attribution; and taking non-Apple tablet\nreviews to task for grading on a curve.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.096"
    },
    {
        "id": 8706589,
        "hacker": "ap22213",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 397,
        "comment": "The US needs another cold war to get it motivated. Maybe if China steps it\nup...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.600"
    },
    {
        "id": 8943110,
        "hacker": "ap22213",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 397,
        "comment": "Two thoughts.\n\nFirst, I'm currently in the process of remodeling my basement. And, it's quite\nexpensive. What I'm spending on remodeling 1500 square feet is approximately\nthe cost of 5 inexpensive cars. Although some of these costs have come from\nthe building supplies, most of the costs have come from labor. Labor in\nexpensive areas is more expensive.\n\nBut, then the cost of land is expensive. There are network effects. Upper-\nmiddle income people want to live around people like them. Educated people\nwant to live around other educated people. Educated people want to live in\nnice climates, in places where they can go out into nature, where they can\nhave ready access to nice shops, art galleries, clean cafes, etc. There are\nnot enough of these types of areas to meet the demand.\n\nAlternatively, one can buy an old house in a rust belt city for $25,000.\nPeople don't want to move there. It's cold, the people are less educated,\nthere aren't fancy shops around, no good coffee, no hiking, no pleasant\nstrolls around the neighborhood. There are fewer high-paying jobs.\n\nIn a rust belt city, you can build a brand new house for less than $90 a sq-\nft. Sure, it won't have the nicest fixtures, but you can.\n\nIn rural areas, outside of the rust belt, you can buy an acre of land for\n$1000. You can build a nice place for under $100,000. But, do educated, upper-\nmiddle income people want to live there?\n\nSome possible solutions: 1) reduce the costs of building. Services should pop\nup that import labor from less expensive areas. The rise of more modular\nhousing, 3D printing of houses, etc. should lessen the costs. 2) create more\nareas where upper-middle income, educated people want to live. This is harder,\nbecause there needs to be jobs, first. It's a chicken/egg problem. How do you\nget employers to set up shop where there aren't any educated workers?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.032"
    },
    {
        "id": 2676142,
        "hacker": "ap22213",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 397,
        "comment": "I agree with you, and I can't argue with the numbers and data. But, still I\nwonder what is classified as 'productive' work and 'productivity', because I\n(and many others I talk to) don't see it. My thoughts are indeed anecdotes,\nand being a data person, I won't tell someone to take it as it is.\n\nHowever, I need to better understand what this data means. I know how to\naggregate data points in ways to create the results that I want to create.\nWhat else is hidden in that data?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.278"
    },
    {
        "id": 10329878,
        "hacker": "ap22213",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 397,
        "comment": "Could part of the problem be that programming languages hijacked ASCII\ncharacters which partially hijacked typewriter functionality?\n\nPascal was always my least favorite language, because it never felt practical.\nFor instance, its assignment requires two shifted keystrokes. Whereas the\nequal symbol requires one non-shifted keystroke.\n\nIn my ideal world, ISO would just standardize programming symbols. Then,\nlanguages could build around those common symbols, and then better input\ndevices could be designed.\n\nIt amazes me that for as much money we spend on software (How many millions of\nprogrammers are there in the world?), we're still using a modified typewriter\nas our primary input device. Look at all the nicely designed specialized input\ndevices we have for video games; surely we can come up with something better\nfor programming.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 10683309,
        "hacker": "mamon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 398,
        "comment": "Sodium batteries are irrelevant, as they have no advantages over lithium\nbatteries (except maybe a slight cost decrease). At the same time Japanese\nengineers prototyped magnesium-ion batteries, which will double capacity of\nLi-Ion:\n\nhttp://www.japantoday.com/category/technology/view/japanese-...\n\nCan't wait to see them entering mass production.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.133"
    },
    {
        "id": 20271209,
        "hacker": "mamon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 398,
        "comment": "What deforestation? At least in my country there's more forrest planted each\nyear than cut out for all the purposes, including paper production. And given\nthat, the rest of paper production process is pretty environment-friendly\ncompared to producing a laptop.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 20226143,
        "hacker": "mamon",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 398,
        "comment": "But not every job has to provide it. Teenager working part time at McDonalds\ndoes not have to earn $100k, they just need to earn enough to buy them new\npair of jeans, or few beers for Saturday night party. It is up to them to\neventually move from such low skill, low pay jobs to an actual career.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.009"
    },
    {
        "id": 3723196,
        "hacker": "nodata",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 399,
        "comment": "Oddly enough, this is similar to publishing social data.\n\nIf I upload my address book to Google, they can see who I know. Often who I\nknow is also who knows me. Without the people in my address book's consent, I\nand my friends have collectively published the information for people who have\nopted out.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.011"
    },
    {
        "id": 6856553,
        "hacker": "nodata",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 399,
        "comment": "Save to Google Drive please.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4073137,
        "hacker": "nodata",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 399,
        "comment": "Not going to work: is that an L (Lima), an I (India) or a 1 (one)?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 3820731,
        "hacker": "nodata",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 399,
        "comment": "ICS == \"industrial control systems\"\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 4809298,
        "hacker": "jfb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 400,
        "comment": "This is largely nonsensical. Apple has trouble with \"The Cloud\", so it should\nbuy a company that doesn't solve any of its problems, as a signaling device to\npotential future hires? What? And I take second place to no man in my disdain\nfor WebObjects, but I know for a fact that a) Apple has very good engineers\nworking on tooling and b) it really doesn't matter to the problems as stated,\nwhich are much more about executive attention.\n\nThe cloud stuff doesn't _make money_. Apple is (or was, when I was there last)\nan extremely profit conscious organization. The reason that the various\nprevious internet initiatives were failures is not because Apple can't hire\ngood engineers, or uses yesterday's technology, but rather because no\nexecutive was going to make it to VP by spending a bunch of money and more\nimportantly engineer time on something that _by design_ loses money, and has\nonly the vaguest connection to driving adoption of hardware.\n\nThis latter has certainly changed -- if the OP has noticed that Android \"Just\nWorks\" in ways that iOS doesn't, rest assured that Apple knows.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.147"
    },
    {
        "id": 4430599,
        "hacker": "jfb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 400,
        "comment": "I've been kicking around a business idea related to patent licensing for small\ncompanies -- acting as a market maker for companies to offer their patents for\nlicense for a fixed price and term. I'm no great fan of the way the IP laws\nwork in the US, but I don't perceive much real noise for change from the\npeople who have the ability to do so, so might as well provide a sane service\nto minimize the chances of some poor dumb bastard getting sued out of her\nshorts for unknowingly infringing on some dumb-ass software patent. This\ndecision is mostly just ammo for the pro- side of my brain.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.069"
    },
    {
        "id": 10711861,
        "hacker": "jfb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 400,
        "comment": " _How do you write an oracle for something that complex?_\n\nYou start with a much smaller problem and incrementally build up.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.150"
    },
    {
        "id": 6830456,
        "hacker": "jfb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 400,
        "comment": "There's some price discrimination going on here, yes, but keep in mind that a)\nthe PQ on that Seiki will be horrible; 2) at 39\" it's way too large; and iii)\nas you note, it does not have a useful way to get a signal into it.\n\nThe win with a ~200dpi 24\" 4k will be OS X-style Retina upscaling, not simply\nscreen real estate.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.086"
    },
    {
        "id": 5856563,
        "hacker": "jfb",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 400,
        "comment": "It's been done [1].\n\n[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_Macintosh_G3_(Blue_%26_W...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 8668347,
        "hacker": "eknkc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 401,
        "comment": "And burn down your backend servers. Assuming you are not swithing to another\nCDN that fast.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.022"
    },
    {
        "id": 18429029,
        "hacker": "eknkc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 401,
        "comment": "This might be an unpopular opinion but,\n\nGoing multi region on AWS should be safe enough.\n\nIf a multi region, multi service meltdown happens on AWS, it will feel like\nmost of the internet has gone down to a lot of users. Being such a\ncatastrophic failure, I bet the service will be restored pretty fast, not in 3\ndays.\n\nYou could go multi cloud though. But when half of the internet struggles to\nwork correctly, I’d not feel too bad about my small business’ downtime.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.013"
    },
    {
        "id": 7147934,
        "hacker": "eknkc",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 401,
        "comment": "Generators actually solve the callback issue:\nhttps://github.com/visionmedia/co\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 15022171,
        "hacker": "humanrebar",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 402,
        "comment": "> ...is not scientific process.\n\nOf course it isn't. When establishing narratives and complex causalities, you\ndon't use scientific (inductive) reasoning, you use abductive reasoning. You\nuse inductive and deductive reasoning to fill in points, but you have to use\nabductive reasoning to reach a broader conclusion.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abductive_reasoning\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.300"
    },
    {
        "id": 5678558,
        "hacker": "humanrebar",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 402,
        "comment": "You cannot pay insurance premiums from an HSA. HSAs have annual caps. Small\nbusiness owners still have to pay some taxes on HSA contributions. The poor\nhave no use for tax deductions because they don't pay income taxes. HSAs are a\npartial answer at best.\n\nAll that being said, I think my original point about employer-provided\ninsurance incentives distorting the healthcare market stands empirically. It\njust costs more if you buy your own health insurance. If taxes aren't the\nreason, what is? And what should be done about that, if anything?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.228"
    },
    {
        "id": 7144672,
        "hacker": "humanrebar",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 402,
        "comment": "For good companies, laundry lists of skills are more like wish lists than\nrequirements, especially with niche technologies. Use the job description to\nfigure out what general kind of developer they're looking for (low level?\ndatabase? UI? enterprise? team lead?) and apply if you're interested.\n\nRegarding the idea in your edit, huge companies like Facebook and Google do\nhave coding puzzles and competitions. People who excel in those surely gain\nconfidence to apply to all sorts of job openings.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.333"
    },
    {
        "id": 15464413,
        "hacker": "humanrebar",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 402,
        "comment": "That could happen. But if your technical leaders are rejecting patches for ego\nreasons, you need to correct that regardless of how you organize your code.\nWorst case, some people aren't cut out for technical leadership.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.333"
    },
    {
        "id": 16930429,
        "hacker": "humanrebar",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 402,
        "comment": "> Has anyone been refused service because they had sex before (or outside)\n> marriage?\n\nHistorically, landlords reserved the right to refuse tenancy to sex workers\nand roommates of different genders. I'm sure laws against these things are on\nthe books. I'm not sure whether they'd stand up in court.\n\nBut you're mostly proving that Christians generally agree that it's not\nsomething to legislate. But that doesn't mean they've changed their values. It\njust means they have a vision of \"sexually kosher\" that they'd like to\npractice and teach to each other without fear of hate or legal repercussion.\nIs it hateful to teach that the Bible is against open marriages? If so, is the\nBible hateful? If so, is it hate speech?\n\nCalifornia passed a law that is in front of the Supreme Court mandating that\npro-life groups educate their clients on how to get abortions. They are also\nconsidering a bill that would outlaw certain kinds of speech about sexual\nmorality and sexual orientation. Already, similar rules exist in corporate\nsettings, teaching that religious belief is inappropriate in work settings but\nthat it's insensitive to assume a man with a wedding ring has a wife and not a\nhusband. And people _do_ get fired for being unorthodox these days. See: Eich,\nDamore, and Williamson. I wouldn't say any of them committed actual crimes or\nin any way violated anyone. Each was let go for speech outside their actual\nday-to-day work.\n\nFinally, you say you're a Christian, but it doesn't sound like you talk to\nmany Evangelical Christian Trump voters [1]. Maybe because most of them\nunderstand the tremendous personal backlash for even sharing how they voted\n(see Shania Twain and Kanye West in the news). There are a few vocal people\nwith blind \"team\" loyalty on facebook, but by in large, Trump voters in the\ngeneral election were against Clinton (and against another liberal judge on\nthe Supreme Court) than they were for Trump. Keep in mind that Trump only\nreally won a plurality in the Republican primary. Most of them would have been\n_much_ happier voting for Rubio. But I suspect that we wouldn't be happy and\nforgiving evangelicals even if in an alternate dimension, Rubio got the\nnomination over Trump.\n\nAnd there are a _lot_ of \"Never Trump\" pundits out there, for example Kevin\nWilliamson. Anti-Trump conservatives are perhaps the majority of commentators\nin the National Review, The Weekly Standard, The Federalist, etc. I don't know\nwhy you'd assume none of them qualify as evangelical. Do you have to have\ntacky suits and claim the blood of Christ on bank accounts to represent\nevangelical views?\n\n> Anyone reacting differently to this should inform you whether they hold\n> Christian values at anything closer than arms length, when it's favorable.\n\nI want to point out that these are instructions on how to judge Christians as\ngood or bad. It's not the job of anybody [2] to judge Christians as good or\nbad, just like it's not the job of a Christian to judge atheists as good or\nbad parents or voters.\n\n _Everyone_ should instead be learning how to be good neighbors. And they\nshould be having real discussions about real issues, perhaps finding\nirreconcilable differences, but they should make detentes and compromises, not\nmore political enemies. I don't see why a same sex couple in San Fransisco and\na large Mormon family in Utah need to be enemies. On the contrary, it seems\nlikely that they can leave each other alone, be colleagues, or even be\nfriends.\n\n[1] Apparently I need this disclaimer everywhere, which is part of my point,\nbut _I_ didn't vote for Trump because he thrives by feeding the divisive\nculture I'm arguing against. Though that was true of Clinton as well (basket\nof deplorables, etc.), so I didn't vote for her either.\n\n[2] Well, it's God's job. And it's the job of a local church to correct sin in\nits congregation.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.088"
    },
    {
        "id": 17143703,
        "hacker": "emodendroket",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 403,
        "comment": "I guess people find them interesting.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.500"
    },
    {
        "id": 12461899,
        "hacker": "emodendroket",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 403,
        "comment": "I don't know, but if you don't have other qualifications to go on, surely the\nfact that they were able to hack it at other companies for a long time is the\nstrongest signal you have.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.140"
    },
    {
        "id": 13491483,
        "hacker": "emodendroket",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 403,
        "comment": "Besides the fact a US company probably cooperates with US intelligence, there\nare plenty of examples of companies outright breaking the law.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.000"
    },
    {
        "id": 13727430,
        "hacker": "emodendroket",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 403,
        "comment": "Makes the MLM guys sound like amateurs.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.400"
    },
    {
        "id": 15654693,
        "hacker": "emodendroket",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 403,
        "comment": "But if you read the article it describes a lot of businesses which are\nprofitable and could plod along, except they're saddled with tons of debt from\nleveraged buyouts.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.200"
    },
    {
        "id": 14520433,
        "hacker": "emodendroket",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 403,
        "comment": "Yeah, but it's become clear that the PC isn't going anywhere at this point,\nand why should it, given the miserable experience of trying to do real work on\na tablet?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.233"
    },
    {
        "id": 14421548,
        "hacker": "emodendroket",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 403,
        "comment": "I feel like _somebody_ is making money from crazy expensive OEM parts.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.550"
    },
    {
        "id": 11814211,
        "hacker": "emodendroket",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 403,
        "comment": "I guess I use Word in a different way than most? I used to be a major user of\nadvanced features like the VBA editor, style editor, etc., and having that all\nwork totally differently bothered me.\n\nIf you just want .doc files lots of programs will do it cheaper.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.193"
    },
    {
        "id": 10135393,
        "hacker": "emodendroket",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 403,
        "comment": "How far afield have you gone? I can't imagine that cutting it for an Asia-US\ntrip.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.250"
    },
    {
        "id": 9190886,
        "hacker": "emodendroket",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 403,
        "comment": "Yeah but it's an ever-rotating parade of amateurs and since the road to\nadvancement is gone they don't stick around to build up the expertise. When I\nwas young you'd walk into a place selling hi-fi stereo equipment and the guy\nthere had worked in the field for decades and had some appreciable knowledge\nof it. Does the guy at Best Buy do that?\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.283"
    },
    {
        "id": 12877734,
        "hacker": "emodendroket",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 403,
        "comment": "Generally tech ageism runs in the other direction.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.037"
    },
    {
        "id": 12743879,
        "hacker": "emodendroket",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 403,
        "comment": "If they're \"inferior\" then it's hard to see them as a fortress for the wealthy\nto hole themselves up in so I think your argument is self-contradictory.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.104"
    },
    {
        "id": 13024105,
        "hacker": "emodendroket",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 403,
        "comment": "If you're at the level where you want to use \"the hard way\" stuff to learn to\nprogram he might have a point.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.292"
    },
    {
        "id": 12543078,
        "hacker": "emodendroket",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 403,
        "comment": "I'm not sure the average native app is better than the average Web app.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.013"
    },
    {
        "id": 16662891,
        "hacker": "DoreenMichele",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 404,
        "comment": "Too bad this isn't some tongue in cheek variation of Buy Me A Coffee. That\nmight be cool. As is: Lame.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "-0.283"
    },
    {
        "id": 16674812,
        "hacker": "DoreenMichele",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 404,
        "comment": "I've had multiple conversations with people, though, granted, it hasn't gotten\nany specific concrete result yet. But I'm not expecting overnight results.\n\nExperience is going to vary.\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.050"
    },
    {
        "id": 21379144,
        "hacker": "DoreenMichele",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 404,
        "comment": "No, homelessness is not (just) a mental health problem. Your own source\nindicates less than half of homeless people have a mental health issue and\nlists depression, anxiety and substance abuse as some of the mental health\nissues suffered by homeless individuals. All three of those can be caused or\nworsened by being homeless.\n\nThere are many factors that contribute to homelessness. Physical ailments can\nhelp lead to homelessness, but so can the high cost of housing:\n\n _Research by Zillow Group Inc. last year found that a 5 percent increase in\nrents in L.A. translates into about 2,000 more homeless people, among the\nhighest correlations in the U.S. The median rent for a one-bedroom in the city\nwas $2,371 in September, up 43 percent from 2010. Similarly, consultant\nMcKinsey & Co. recently concluded that the runup in housing costs was 96\npercent correlated with Seattle’s soaring homeless population. Even skeptics\nhave come around to accepting the relationship. “I argued for a long time that\nthe homelessness issue wasn’t due to rents,” says Joel Singer, chief executive\nofficer of the California Association of Realtors. “I can’t argue that\nanymore.”_\n\nhttps://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-11-20/the-homel...\n\n",
        "comment_saltiness_score": "0.063"
    },
    {
        "id": 20785077,
        "hacker": "DoreenMichele",
        "hacker_salt_ranking": 404,
        "comment": "Lack of adequate housing supply is a contributing factor to homelessness. If\nyou are just throwing people in jail and not addressing issues of that ilk, it\nrapidly becomes un